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blueleaf
04-09-2010, 10:04 PM
Open to queries for completed works.

Fiction should have some type of shapeshifter, vampire, zombie, and/or similar element (but no ghosts or "general" paranormal).

Genres: Science fiction, fantasy, spec-fic. With or without romance.
(Preferred) Length: 35,000 to 65,000 words.

New for 2012: Illustrated, graphic, manga & light novels also considered.

For more information: http://blueleafpub.com/submissions.html
& also read the FAQs: http://blueleafpub.com/faqs.html


* * * Pay rate as of 12/2012 * * *

EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS, 2-YEAR TERM
ROYALTIES: 30% OF NET EBOOKS
20% OF NET PRINT BOOKS
Small advance often offered.

(Note that the standard royalty rates above will apply to most, but for
an established author or some graphic works, we are open to discussion.)

fireandicewriter
08-09-2010, 09:24 PM
What is the latest acceptance time? I am working on a novel that will hopefully reach a desired word amount with the main character a strong female. It is a fantasy, and a romance, sort of. Please give me the submission date!

Maryn
08-09-2010, 10:05 PM
Hi. Thanks for sharing the opportunity. One problem, though. (Don’t worry, it’s an easy fix.)

We ask that pay rates be included in the subject line of all Paying Markets posts. (See the RULES OF THE PAYING MARKETS FORUM: PLEASE READ BEFORE POSTING A NEW THREAD/COMMENTING (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11828) thread.) Your post doesn’t include the pay rate at all, much less in the subject line.

Why do we need this? We've had repeated problems with our members being critical of pay rates. By putting what you're paying for how many words right in the subject line, AW’s writers need never even open posts for paying markets whose pay rate they consider unacceptable for themselves. Problem solved--but only if everyone posting complies with our rules.

Experience says that expecting AW members to contact you privately about pay rate, or to get the information from a website you’ve linked, won’t do it. In fact, we’ve found it fairly common for the linked guidelines to have no mention of pay rate.

It will help us a lot if you edit your post to include the pay rates shown on your submissions page at the website. Contact the board moderator to add the information to your subject line.

Maryn, thanking you in advance

fireandicewriter
08-09-2010, 10:07 PM
Thanks for the addition! I new something was missing, but I could't target it... Thanks! and I love your profile pic!

PortableHal
08-09-2010, 10:13 PM
Hi Blue Leaf,

Welcome to the boards! I enjoyed looking over your website but a couple of questions did come to mind.

You do PoD via Amazon but, on your FAQ, you write:
Do titles you publish get a Library of Congress Number? Not at this time.

I'm surprised by this response. I'm not certain that Amazon will publish without issuing an ISBN (and, if you don't give them one, they'll issue their own...and list themselves as the publisher). Am I understanding you correctly?

Like a lot of small publishers, you ask for a marketing plan. You also allow writers to provide their own cover art. Presumably, you provide editing (a huge plus if the editor is a good 'un), but is there any other reason to go with Blue Leaf over self-pub?

MartinD
08-10-2010, 11:23 PM
New publisher, no ISBN, and 30% on e-books, which seems low. Is this really the outfit to use?

veinglory
08-10-2010, 11:33 PM
30% in itself wouldn't be terribly low, but it seems to be on net.

jennontheisland
08-10-2010, 11:34 PM
Editors are apparently also paid a percentage of net.

thothguard51
08-11-2010, 01:40 AM
PortableHal,

Do titles you publish get a Library of Congress Number? Not at this time.

If I am not mistaken, the ISBN number has nothing to do with if a publisher list with the Library of Congress. That is a whole different system for cataloging, if I am not mistaken...

PortableHal
08-11-2010, 05:07 AM
Thothguard, you're right. The Library of Congress number thing is new to me (I think we're talking an LCCN but definitely not an ISBN) and confuses me.

I'm still hoping blueleaf will return to share more info about their company.

Nuklear1
09-02-2010, 06:26 AM
Like a lot of small publishers, you ask for a marketing plan. You also allow writers to provide their own cover art. Presumably, you provide editing (a huge plus if the editor is a good 'un), but is there any other reason to go with Blue Leaf over self-pub?






That sounds like what I was told by Black Rose.

blueleaf
11-08-2010, 03:09 AM
Updated submissions guidelines: http://blueleafpub.com/submissions.htm

More info posted here: http://www.blueleafpub.blogspot.com/

waylander
11-08-2010, 03:17 AM
35-65k is very short for full novels

jennontheisland
11-08-2010, 03:27 AM
Annually? For ebooks? On net? Srsly?

How do you pay royalties?

Royalties are paid on an annual basis. Royalties are calculated as 30% of the net amount received for electronic formats and 15% of the net amount received for print formats for each sale. This rate is non-negotiable.


Looks like no distribution for print, and buyers sent off site for ebooks that aren't pdf (likely resulting in loss of royalties due to third party sales charges):

Who sells your books? Do you sell direct?

Printed books are usually sold through Amazon.com however titles that reach a specific sales benchmark may be optioned to have wider availability through Ingram and libraries as well. Because sellers can change their policies at any time, there is no guarantee that any work will be sold through any specific venue. Presently, we only sell .pdf versions of our ebooks direct; for other formats, buyers are directed to our distributors/online vendors.

blueleaf
12-14-2012, 09:57 PM
Posted updated submission info at top of page.

eternalised
12-16-2012, 12:45 PM
Royalties only once a year? That's strange. And why do you accept such small works? 35-65k is hardly the standard word count for general fiction novels. Could you please explain why you've made these choices, Blueleaf?

I also get the feeling from your FAQ the author will have to do a lot of the promotion themselves. What can you offer that's better than self-pubbing?

blueleaf
12-17-2012, 02:52 AM
>> Royalties only once a year? That's strange.

It may be for some, however, it works for us and while we do realize it may not suit everyone’s taste, it is how we established our system.

(On a side note, this is one reason we offer a nominal advance.)


>> And why do you accept such small works?
>> 35-65k is hardly the standard word count
>> for general fiction novels.

35-65K is our ‘preferred’ word count as we are aiming for a certain price point in order to keep the finished product competitive in the market (and not just the online market as we do try to get shelf placement).

Longer works for fiction and less for illustrated works are considered too, but it will depend on the potential of story/work itself.


>> I also get the feeling from your FAQ the author
>> will have to do a lot of the promotion themselves.

While we ask that author promote their work, it is not a requirement as we do not feel it is fair to ask an author to step too far out of their own comfort zone and do anything more than what they feel like they want to do.

And it’s also our policy to advise that whatever promotion they do be as cost-effective as possible (as free can be a good thing).

However, one thing we do ask for from a querying author is to submit an idea of what they *might* want to do to promote.

Why? Because it’s good to think beyond the publication of the work, regardless of whether one chooses to go the agent, publisher, vanity, or self-pubbing route.


>> What can you offer that's better than self-pubbing?

It’s not so much a matter of ‘better than’ as it is about what the author wants.

Yes, there is potential and profit in self-publishing and a lot of authors do succeed with it.

Yes, when the basic elements are compared--things like: editorial; design, layout, misc pre-press production; obtaining reviews, endorsements; creating marketing materials; establishing relations with printers, distributors, ebook vendors, etc.--agreed, all of that can be done on an independent basis as well.

However, while it can be done independently, there are still some authors who want a more ‘hands-off’ approach for they want (or prefer) the “writing” side of the industry more than the “business” side.

They don’t want to have to think about the technical stuff, much less the investment ($$) that may be necessary to get the book from draft to final product.

There may even be a few out there who may have even tried the self-pubbing route and discovered they aren’t all that crazy about it.

So, for reasons like this, going with a publisher might be the right choice for them.

But to get back to the question, “What can you offer that's better than self-publishing?”

Well, let’s try: Being associated with someone who believes enough in an author’s work that they are willing to take on the risk of doing what is necessary to get that work from manuscript to market with the intention of (hopefully) making that work not only something the author can be proud of, but also something that can be considered a success.*

[*Said with the caveat that, no matter how many “good intentions” and solid efforts are put into a work, the reality is that there is no guarantee any work will be a success, regardless of what method of publication is used.]