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tutter
03-26-2010, 09:45 PM
Hey there all!

I recently got a request from an agent to revise and resubmit. Do these situations happen often? I would love to hear your stories. :-)

Brandy
03-26-2010, 10:30 PM
They happen fairly often, and it's encouraging. If you agree with the revisions and your excited about the agent go for it. Otherwise you just keep querying.

sheadakota
03-26-2010, 10:55 PM
This is a very good thing!

skippingstone
03-26-2010, 11:42 PM
Two agents have told me that they'll look at my ms again if I revise it. I don't know that that's necessarily "asking" me to revise -- just that they'd give me another look if I did. I haven't done so because I'm still waiting to hear back from other agents who have my ms. When I hear back from all and sundry, I'll figure out what to do next, especially if the feedback is similar. But I'm hopeful another agent will like the ms as is, obviously.

Also, I'd be more inclined to make revisions for an agent who I feel is a good match for me, so that's something to take into account as well. If I'm gonna have to change, I want to change for someone who likes me and whose opinion I respect. :)

tutter
03-26-2010, 11:46 PM
SkippingStone--that's a very good point! I did some revisions for this current agent because I understood what she was saying, but honestly, I hope that the "original" version with other agents right now is what really wins them over.

kellion92
03-26-2010, 11:48 PM
I think this is becoming more common for agents and editors -- things are tough, and they don't necessarily want to take chances on a writer who may not be ABLE to revise.

Only revise if you think the revisions would make your book better. Then you have a better book to query whether the agent accepts you as a client or not. If you don't agree, look for someone who shares your vision or you'll run into trouble down the line.

skippingstone
03-27-2010, 12:02 AM
Kellion makes another good point. A lot of writers resist making changes because they don't know how to make changes.

You have to be able to spin that novel around on its axis if need be. Change POV. Rewrite it backwards in Swahili. Whatever. It gives you confidence when you know you COULD change, it's just a matter of deciding if you want to. There should be no fear in writing just as there should be no crying in baseball.

What's the quote I've seen here at AW several times? It's not writing that gets you published, it's rewriting.

dgrintalis
03-27-2010, 12:08 AM
I am in this same boat, except the agent called me to talk about the revisions. Like Kellion, I think it's due to the state of the industry right now. Mr. Agent flat out told me there are some writers who refuse to do any revisions. Even after our phone conversation, we had a long string of emails back and forth regarding the ending of my manuscript. His suggestions ended up being spot-on. He loved the new ending, then asked me to revise a few other small things, and now I'm waiting to hear back from him. I don't know if my case is typical with the phone call and follow-up communication, but there you have it. He's going to get back to me by this coming Monday, so I'm in a holding pattern of bundled nerves right now. Based on his personality on the phone and his responsiveness with a potential client, I have my fingers and toes crossed.

tutter
03-27-2010, 12:17 AM
dgrintalis--that's fantastic news! I haven't had any phone conversations with aforementioned agent, but I suppose that any sort of investment in our work post-R is a good thing. I mean, why would they put in the time if they weren't at least more than a little interested, right? :-)

dgrintalis
03-27-2010, 12:28 AM
Thank you, Tutter. Yes, he's indicated as such, but although I'm hopeful, I'm not counting my chickens before the eggs have hatched. That way lies madness, or at the very least, heavy disappointment. :)

tutter
03-27-2010, 12:30 AM
True that.

Jamesaritchie
03-27-2010, 11:21 PM
They happen fairly often. IF you love the suggestions, if they come across as things you should have thought of yourself, do the revision. If not, move on to the next agent. Most agents know next to nothing about writing, and agent requests for recreates screw up at least as many books as they help, so trust your own judgement.

The next agent may want things just a sthey are, or may ask for changes that are completely opposite of what this agents wants.

mairi
09-16-2010, 09:51 AM
hi. im kinda in the same boat...anyone here has some links to share that help with r&r?

the only ones ive found so far was the post by kristin miller on ya highway and the next part by her agent susan townsend.

blacbird
09-16-2010, 11:36 AM
The next agent may want things just a sthey are, or may ask for changes that are completely opposite of what this agents wants.

Or there may be no "next agent", nothing but a continuous and endless sequence of form-rejections or no-responses.

Calla Lily
09-16-2010, 05:20 PM
Popping in here and making like Susie Sunshine because there's just too much negativity in the world. :D :Sun:

I had 2 R&Rs on 2 different mss. One was spot-on, and I made notes, but started the R&R on ms. 2 because I thought it had more commercial potential. I saved the original and started the revisions. In the meantime, I had an R that was the polar opposite of the agent requesting the R&R. The first liked it and wanted certain tweaks to put different slants on things. I decided this The second said (almost literally) that my characters were as boring as watching paint dry. :roll: Because the second was so opposite of all my other feedback, I ignored it.

In the meantime, another agent called to request the full, called 3 days later to discuss--and specifically ask if I was open to revision. 2 days later, he offered. The tweaks he suggested were similar to the R&R agent's tweaks.

My opinionated opinion #1:

Agents know what the market wants and know how to suggest tweaks to your book to make it more marketable. Just vet an agent before signing with them (I didn't the first time; don't go there. It's a bad place).

My opinionated opinion #2:

If you're getting requests (this includes R&Rs) then you are the definition of "almost there". You will get other requests. I have never seen this pattern broken in the 5 years I've been working toward publication. Once you've mastered the craft to the "getting requests" point, then it is a matter of time, synchronicity, and the agent who will fall in love with your book.

Erin
09-16-2010, 07:19 PM
I received an R&R request last year and I thought the ideas were good, so I made them and it made my novel much better. The agent liked them, but ended up rejecting me for another reason (which she didn't indicate when she asked for the R&R). I really didn't know what to make of that, but I moved on.

I recently got an R&R request from another agent on just the partial of the book I'm currently querying (which required changes thru the full MS). Again, the proposed changes were spot on. I'm still waiting to hear back from the agent. But I tweaked my query to encompass the change, and I've since gotten 3 full and 1 partial request on this new version!

I say do the revisions if you agree with them. You may just love the book even more when you're done.

Karen Duvall
09-17-2010, 07:31 AM
Popping in here and making like Susie Sunshine because there's just too much negativity in the world. :D :Sun:

I had 2 R&Rs on 2 different mss. One was spot-on, and I made notes, but started the R&R on ms. 2 because I thought it had more commercial potential. I saved the original and started the revisions. In the meantime, I had an R that was the polar opposite of the agent requesting the R&R. The first liked it and wanted certain tweaks to put different slants on things. I decided this The second said (almost literally) that my characters were as boring as watching paint dry. :roll: Because the second was so opposite of all my other feedback, I ignored it.

In the meantime, another agent called to request the full, called 3 days later to discuss--and specifically ask if I was open to revision. 2 days later, he offered. The tweaks he suggested were similar to the R&R agent's tweaks.

My opinionated opinion #1:

Agents know what the market wants and know how to suggest tweaks to your book to make it more marketable. Just vet an agent before signing with them (I didn't the first time; don't go there. It's a bad place).

My opinionated opinion #2:

If you're getting requests (this includes R&Rs) then you are the definition of "almost there". You will get other requests. I have never seen this pattern broken in the 5 years I've been working toward publication. Once you've mastered the craft to the "getting requests" point, then it is a matter of time, synchronicity, and the agent who will fall in love with your book.

Brilliant, Lily! And so so so very true. :) IOW, I agree. :Hug2:

abctriplets
09-22-2010, 07:42 AM
Great advice. Any idea as to the best method of replying to a R&R?
I think I'm leaning towards:

"You haven't heard the last from me. BWA-HA-HA-HAA!"

Or maybe I'll skip the maniacal laugh, and go with something more professional...

Calla Lily
09-22-2010, 03:24 PM
*snort* Um, I'd stick with: "Thank you for your invitation to revise and resubmit. I will forward the updated ms. soon."

Cloud Eight
09-22-2010, 08:13 PM
Tutter, I did several revisions for an agent before signing, and a brush-up afterward. Even if all that work hadn't resulted in representation, the suggested revisions were spot-on and my book is the better for it.

Callalily, your story is simply amazing. Major congrats.

CaroGirl
09-22-2010, 08:19 PM
How about do the revisions requested (that you agree with) but keep the original, in case the agent still doesn't want it? That sounds win-win to me.

Good luck.

A.P.M.
09-28-2010, 07:29 PM
I agree with Carogirl-do the revisions, but keep the original copy if you're not sure. I've had two instances of being asked to do a revise and resubmit (I'm on three now-sigh) and both times they were ultimately rejected.