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Calliopenjo
03-19-2010, 02:56 AM
Hi there,

Dogs have the uncanny ability to sneeze backwards. Is there a technical name for it?

WriteKnight
03-19-2010, 03:10 AM
Uh, 'farting'?

Captcha
03-19-2010, 03:38 AM
Wikipedia says 'reverse sneezing' or 'inspiratory paroxysmal respiration'.

sheadakota
03-19-2010, 04:02 AM
Hi there,

Dogs have the uncanny ability to sneeze backwards. Is there a technical name for it?
actually not all dogs can do this- only those that are bracheocephalic- the ones with smooshed in faces like pugs and bull dogs-

SWest
03-19-2010, 04:31 AM
Any dog may experience the Reverse Sneeze phenomenon. It is poorly understood physiologically since it is not of any medical significance (i.e., it is not dangerous or life-threatening).

During my 15 years as a full time veterinary technician, I have seen it happen to just about every size and shape of dog. Those with an elongated soft palate being more susceptible (Beagles do it sooooo much).

Affected dogs get stuck sucking air IN, and cannot exhale while the spasm is active. Dogs can learn to relieve their paroxysms more quickly by licking the nose. I have taught many dogs to do this on command ("swallow").

Nasal mites should be suspected in endemic areas.

Read up to date info here: Veterinary Information Network (http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=2335).

Calliopenjo
03-19-2010, 05:39 AM
Thanks guys. :Hug2:

sheadakota
03-19-2010, 05:49 AM
Any dog may experience the Reverse Sneeze phenomenon. It is poorly understood physiologically since it is not of any medical significance (i.e., it is not dangerous or life-threatening).

During my 15 years as a full time veterinary technician, I have seen it happen to just about every size and shape of dog. Those with an elongated soft palate being more susceptible (Beagles do it sooooo much).

Affected dogs get stuck sucking air IN, and cannot exhale while the spasm is active. Dogs can learn to relieve their paroxysms more quickly by licking the nose. I have taught many dogs to do this on command ("swallow").

Nasal mites should be suspected in endemic areas.

Read up to date info here: Veterinary Information Network (http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=2335).
ahh- did not know this- stupid animal planet-lol! thanks for the info!

SWest
03-19-2010, 06:38 AM
"animal planet" :eek: ~shudder~

Fiction writers do better research! :D

GeorgeK
03-19-2010, 09:17 AM
so it's a hiccup? a snort?

One of our great pyranees will sound like she's hocking a loogie with spastic inspirations from time to time. Typically after eating, or maybe that's just when I'm around. It doesn't seem to bother her. The vet always seems to change the subject when we bring it up. Mainly it sounds frightening to us. It is LOUD.

shaldna
03-19-2010, 01:18 PM
I've never seen a dog do this. But horses do something similar.

SWest
03-19-2010, 03:42 PM
so it's a hiccup? a snort?

One of our great pyranees will sound like she's hocking a loogie with spastic inspirations from time to time. Typically after eating, or maybe that's just when I'm around. It doesn't seem to bother her. The vet always seems to change the subject when we bring it up. Mainly it sounds frightening to us. It is LOUD.

Dogs that eat fast often get bits of food lodged in their throat...this is enough to set of the Reverse Sneeze spasm, and the most common reason that large breeds do it. If you wanted to, you could feed her with a Kong toy or similar "food puzzle" to make her go more slowly. Not very practical for this size of pooch. ;)

Hiccups originate in the diaphragm (the giant muscle below the lungs), but Reverse Sneeze happens in the very back of the throat.

Most dogs sound like this: "Snork-snork-SNNNOooork."

The closest thing that people experience is the Sneeze response to respiratory irritants. Completely different from a willful snort or "hawk". If you've ever had a "Sneezing Fit"--this is the nearest equivalent. You can lose your breath temporarily, but once it stops, you feel fine.

I'm sorry that your vet is so casual about your concerns--this is distressing to see and hear when you have no idea what is happening!

As long as it stops and she is not fazed, there is nothing to worry about. Dogs who are attended by very anxious owners can be delayed getting back to normal, so just try to stay as calm as you can.

YAwriter72
03-19-2010, 03:57 PM
My 18 year old corgie mix does it. We call it snorking. She sounds almost like a pig sometimes. The vet said there is a reason behind it (No I wasn't paying much attention at that point, she's 18, we were marveling over her age!) and if it got too bad she could go on meds.

StephanieFox
03-19-2010, 09:04 PM
Bulldog people call this a 'reverse sneeze.' The bulldog message boards get a lot of panicky new owners posting questions about this, but it's harmless. It's like the dog clearing it's throat. Most of the dogs I've had do this, but pushed-faced breeds do it more often. My bulldog can do this any time and it's not from eating too fast. My dog actually chews her food.

Your vet was probably a little blazeŽ because he probably gets this question a lot and he knows how benign it is (kind of like the time I took my bulldog puppy to the vet because I found a lump on her. It turned out to be a mosquito bite.)