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View Full Version : If you could live anywhere in the mid-south east coast...



Fenika
03-06-2010, 10:12 PM
Where would you live and why? After I graduate I have a little flexibility in where I get a job and I figured I should look into some towns now.

For climate I'm looking at areas south of Delaware but north of Georgia. Preferably a coastal state, so that narrows the list down a bit ;)

But I don't know much about the area other than Durham was nice when I visited in HS.

Ideally looking for something rural but within an hour or so of a nice city. Low crime, good equestrian community, relaxed (so no tourist traps!).

So where should I be looking? What's it like? How are the people? Paint me a picture please :)

And I can't move back to my home state of Delaware (not that I want to really) because in my field of work that would mean staring at chickens all day long x.x

Of course, if you want to convince me to move somewhere else, I'll listen as long as it's not the middle of nowhere, cold, and rainy. Someone told me Oregon is nice...

Chris P
03-06-2010, 10:14 PM
You seem to be describing North Carolina. If you like mountains then Asheville would be your bet. It's a big enough town on its own (certainly bigger than here!) and not too far from Grenville/Spartanburg SC. Not too sure how far it is from Raleigh, I've only gone there from the west.

Fenika
03-06-2010, 10:38 PM
Wow, Asheville looks nice, and they certainly do a good job promoting organic and natural foods which is a perk.

I grew up in a very flat area, so I'm not used to mountains but don't dislike them.

Lavern08
03-06-2010, 10:42 PM
Check out Charlottesville, Virginia (beautiful *horse country*)

Asheville, NC is very nice too. ;)

cscarlet
03-06-2010, 10:50 PM
I live in Hampton Roads, and the Suffolk, VA area or Williamsburg, VA area are both actually quite nice as far as rural-but-close goes. They're both within a short drive to Virginia Beach and the city of Norfolk and have plenty of land/equestrian farms.

I like living in Hampton Roads because the traffic is not nearly as bad as other more populated areas, it's nice to be within a short drive to both Virginia Beach and the Outer Banks during the summer, and not too far away from the mountains during the winter. It's also nice to be within driving distance (3.5 hrs) to Washington DC.

And if you ever have to fly out of Norfolk, it's the easiest airport ever as far as security lines and such.

Fenika
03-07-2010, 01:24 AM
All that sounds loffly. And good airports are a perk.

MaryMumsy
03-07-2010, 01:58 AM
Check out Charlottesville, Virginia (beautiful *horse country*)

C'ville is also an extremely expensive place to live. Food isn't too bad, but shelter, utilities etc are horrid. I have a good friend who lives there. If she could save enough money to get out she would. The town is nice, you have the U of VA, surrounding countryside is lovely. She can hardly make ends meet on $43,000 a year, and she does not live 'high on the hog'. There are also few decent paying jobs other than connected to the university.

MM

NeuroFizz
03-07-2010, 01:58 AM
If you want nice beaches, coastal North Carolina is good, particularly if you don't want the big hotels all over the beaches. The mountainous part of the state is still within a day's drive. I'm in Wilmington, which is small for a city but big for a town. Yet it has an amazingly vigorous arts community and, thanks to the university, all of the perks of a college town. And the beaches are amazing with 85 degree water in the Summer (thanks Gulf Stream). Downside - hurricanes and the strange mindsets that come with living in a beach community (body image issues, tourist migrations, mix of everything from wealthy seasonal home owners to rural single-wide residents sometimes along the same road).

Fenika
03-07-2010, 02:30 AM
I will put C'ville on my list of places not to live too close to. The beautiful horse country is a tempting factor ;)

Neuro- You're making me drool. Aside from those downsides, ofc x.x

I'm well familiar with hurricanes, though I'm aware that Delaware's worse is the southern coast's medium.

But 85F water? Sounds peachy.

Perks
03-07-2010, 02:35 AM
Wow, Asheville looks nice, and they certainly do a good job promoting organic and natural foods which is a perk.

I grew up in a very flat area, so I'm not used to mountains but don't dislike them.I live in Asheville. It's wonderful. We've been here five years and, weather and scenery-wise, it's the nicest place I've ever lived.

bettielee
03-07-2010, 03:12 AM
**cross Asheville off list**

HA HA HA HA HA!

J/K Perks.

Fenika
03-07-2010, 03:25 AM
*Adds Asheville for the Perks*

Ya win some, you lose some... ;)

More seriously, what else can you tell me about Asheville?

Perks
03-07-2010, 04:35 AM
It's beautiful. Here's some pics from the city's website (http://www.exploreasheville.com/videos-podcasts-pictures/index.aspx).

It's a very artsy community. Lots of music and galleries and festivals. The climate is very nice - winters usually don't stray for long below 45 degrees, summers hover mostly in the 80s with moderate humidity. (Of course, it vaults these norms for a few days each year and it's snowed about forty times this winter, but you know how it is.)

Traffic is mild and there's lots of hiking, camping, rafting close by. There's lots of tattoos and dredlocks. It's a very interesting blend of the edge of the Bible belt cheek to jowl with neo-Pagans, Eastern religions, Unitarians, and I even met someone who worshipped Thor. No lie.

Asheville is full of utterly amazing food.

On the downside, it's a bit tatty in places. Old, you know. There are lots of places that still have above ground powerlines and a lack of zoning will make a odd mix of residential and commercial areas, but I got used to that pretty quickly.

Your GPS will be useless. Be prepared to be lost. A lot. Asheville is the only place I've ever been that you can be driving East, North, and South all at the same time.

Fenika
03-07-2010, 04:41 AM
Ohhhh, I'm liking this. And hey, there's actual ski fields south of the Poconos. Who knew? :)

Another downside: The beach is a tad far, but not horribly so.

Since my GPS is useless at times anyways, I'll try not to hold it against Asheville...

Perks
03-07-2010, 04:47 AM
Ah yes. The beach is a long way away, but as I can only stand sand in my crevices for, at most, three days running, it doesn't bother me. I'm definitely more a mountains kinda girl.

Perks
03-07-2010, 04:49 AM
Plus, we have the coolest thunderstorms. I guess anyone who lives in the mountains has experienced this, but I'm from Washington, DC, so I was impressed.

When thunder rolls, is bounces off the hills, back and forth, and a peal of thunder can last for half a minute. If it hits right, you can actually feel the shockwave. It's wild.

CheekyWench
03-07-2010, 05:01 AM
Plus, we have the coolest thunderstorms. I guess anyone who lives in the mountains has experienced this, but I'm from Washington, DC, so I was impressed.

When thunder rolls, is bounces off the hills, back and forth, and a peal of thunder can last for half a minute. If it hits right, you can actually feel the shockwave. It's wild.


I lived about an hour away from Asheville for a while and miss it terribly.

Rowan
03-07-2010, 06:34 AM
Middleburg and Upperville, Virginia are great for horse enthusiasts but are expensive areas. Bluemont is nice (Actor Robert Duvall lives in Philomont area not far away). :)

There are some less expensive areas around Middleburg too---Haymarket, Aldie, etc. not to mention Leesburg, VA (home to Morvern Park--location of many horse shows/events).

Loudoun County (VA) in general is nice---I live here and I love it. :)


http://www.middleburg.org/
http://www.middleburgclassic.com/
http://www.upperville.com/
http://www.visitloudoun.org/ **Check out the "Horse Country" video!

Fenika
03-07-2010, 06:29 PM
This is going to be the move to Asheville thread if more peeps don't chime in :D

Rowan- those towns sound loffly. One can never have enough horsie folks around.

Cranky
03-07-2010, 06:33 PM
I've lived in both VA Beach and a little town southeast of Raleigh. My vote goes to NC, if it matters. :)

Fenika
03-07-2010, 06:36 PM
It does, unless you are meeting me there in your current avatar :D

So why NC over VA? What's the difference between the states? I have a vague feel for what VA is like, but not so much NC (other than Duke's campus, lol)

Cranky
03-07-2010, 06:49 PM
It does, unless you are meeting me there in your current avatar :D

So why NC over VA? What's the difference between the states? I have a vague feel for what VA is like, but not so much NC (other than Duke's campus, lol)


Hmmm. I may be a bit biased, but VA was very tourist heavy (from my POV), and NC far less so. Where I lived in NC was a reasonable drive to the coast, too, so I could still get to the beaches. I also liked the surrounding countryside better, too. VA had lots of beautiful trees and is *gorgeous* during the late spring/early summer, but I thought NC was beautiful year-round. I also like living in a smaller town, but with access to larger cities. That may just be me, though. I might feel differently if I had lived in Raleigh or Fayetteville, or some such. :)

Rowan
03-07-2010, 09:37 PM
And in VA you have to deal with the characters from DC... ;)

pdknz
03-08-2010, 02:22 AM
Of course, if you want to convince me to move somewhere else, I'll listen as long as it's not the middle of nowhere, cold, and rainy. Someone told me Oregon is nice...

Well, it isn't rainy. I like Alaska, and we ended up in the middle of nowhere by most standards. It gets cold, the road only goes about 6 miles out to the dump, and the nearest road with a stoplight is about 400 miles away.

If I want to buy a McDonald's hamburger, the plane ticket would cost about $400, and UPS doesn't even pretend to deliver here. But when I drive or walk through town, everybody waves, and I don't lock my house or my car, and I know everyone on our street by name. And their kids, parents, dogs, cars, and who lived there before they moved in. I don't carry ID or money most days, and my car doesn't have a license plate, and the speed limit on our dead end road is about as fast as a kid can peddle his tricycle.

But, hey, somebody has to live in the cities. Just glad it's not me.

CheekyWench
03-08-2010, 03:02 AM
Well, it isn't rainy. I like Alaska, and we ended up in the middle of nowhere by most standards. It gets cold, the road only goes about 6 miles out to the dump, and the nearest road with a stoplight is about 400 miles away.

If I want to buy a McDonald's hamburger, the plane ticket would cost about $400, and UPS doesn't even pretend to deliver here. But when I drive or walk through town, everybody waves, and I don't lock my house or my car, and I know everyone on our street by name. And their kids, parents, dogs, cars, and who lived there before they moved in. I don't carry ID or money most days, and my car doesn't have a license plate, and the speed limit on our dead end road is about as fast as a kid can peddle his tricycle.

But, hey, somebody has to live in the cities. Just glad it's not me.

That sounds dreamy.

Fenika
03-08-2010, 03:26 AM
If that were Hawaii I'd so be there ;)

Rowan
03-08-2010, 03:50 AM
I lived on Oahu when I was in the 'Corps! I loved it...but so expensive. Beautiful place though. The sunsets *sigh*.... :)

Fenika
03-08-2010, 05:11 PM
I'd move to New Zealand right now if I could, but I'd prefer some job security and such...