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gwendy85
03-04-2010, 01:27 PM
Hi guys!

I'm just bordering a bit on the desperate side here. If anyone here knows how to speak Japanese, I'd really love a romaji translation of this line from my novel:

"I wish you would love me...even a little..."

Appreciate it! Arigato gozaimasu!

kaitie
03-04-2010, 02:02 PM
Yay, finally somewhere I can put my skills to the test! :D

watashi no koto wo aishite kurereba iindakedo. sukoshi demo.

私のことを愛してくれればいいんだけど。 少しでも。

That should do it. I left out the subject for "you" because I figured it was implied. Hope this helps. Now to see if someone comes along and corrects me haha. ;) Feeling pretty sure on this though. I made it sorta casual, too. Figured that was the feeling you were going for.

gwendy85
03-04-2010, 02:42 PM
Oh my God! Thank you so much kaitie! This particular line has been in the works for almost three years!

Unfortunately, I can't read kanji or katakana (and neither can my computer, LOL!) and...nihongo ga sukoshi wakarimasu. (I don't know if I even said that one right, haha!)

I was wondering though...if the way it's being said, the mood I mean, can alter the words used? Because the setting's kind of serious. Actually, the guy who says the line "I wish you would love me...even a little..." is mumbling while the woman helps him to bed. He is between the throes of sleep and awake but the way he says it...it's you know, from the heart. And it's set during World War II, by the way, so I'm not really sure how they speak at the time, haha. You think 'ore' would be more appropriate as opposed to 'watashi'? The guy's a Japanese soldier.

Again, THANK YOU SO MUCH!!! *bows deeply*

Tocotin
03-05-2010, 05:52 AM
And it's set during World War II, by the way, so I'm not really sure how they speak at the time, haha. You think 'ore' would be more appropriate as opposed to 'watashi'? The guy's a Japanese soldier.


Yes ore or boku would be better.

Hi Kaitie, ;) it is okay, but I think you left out one れ as it's kurereba くれれば. Sorry!

My 2 cents, not to undermine what Kaitie said. I'm not sure about 愛する ai suru in this context, it sounds very err bookish? I'd say おれのことを少しでも思ってくれれば、ore-no koto-o sukoshi demo omotte kurereba. I know that Western readers are very familiar with aisuru though, it's just that the Japanese almost never use it.

gwendy85
03-05-2010, 02:51 PM
Thanks much Katie and Tocotin!

By the way, like I said, my computer can't understand Kanji either LOL, so it's ore no koto o sukoshi demo omotte kurereba ? No ai suru?

Ugawa
03-05-2010, 03:45 PM
and...nihongo ga sukoshi wakarimasu. (I don't know if I even said that one right, haha!)




Ha. Watashi mo. I think you said it right.

RedStringSoul
03-07-2010, 12:16 AM
Yes ore or boku would be better.

Hi Kaitie, ;) it is okay, but I think you left out one れ as it's kurereba くれれば. Sorry!

My 2 cents, not to undermine what Kaitie said. I'm not sure about 愛する ai suru in this context, it sounds very err bookish? I'd say おれのことを少しでも思ってくれれば、ore-no koto-o sukoshi demo omotte kurereba. I know that Western readers are very familiar with aisuru though, it's just that the Japanese almost never use it.

I also agree with this. Westerners are more accustomed to seeing the word LOVE (tm) but for Japanese, it is more heavily inferred via context rather than outright said.

kdnxdr
03-07-2010, 12:25 AM
CDSinex, over in poetry, is an expert in Japanese but he is out of town this week.

cheers!

kid

kaitie
03-07-2010, 08:30 AM
Eek, I did leave off a re. Sorry about that! Editing it momentarily. ;) That's what happens when I'm in a hurry haha.

I actually assumed the speaker was a woman, hence "watashi." Ore is kinda...not a good thing to say. Very few people actually use it as it's a little gruff and rude. Boku works better for a guy. People where I live (both sexes) use "uchi" all the time, but that apparently sounds a little hick, from what I've been told. Inaka-poi lol.

I deliberated on the "ai suru" as well. I originally used "suki," because it's more common to use "suki" for "love." Then I decided to pull out a dictionary that has full phrases and see some examples, and from the examples given it seemed like sentences with this particular sentiment were always using "ai" as opposed to "suki." They also use "ai" in movies and television often, so it's not exactly uncommon. I think the difference is that "ai" implies more of a passionate love, which is why I ended up going with it instead. Everything basically depends on the feeling trying to be conveyed, so I basically inferred haha.

I believe I have been out-Japanesed. ;)

Tocotin
03-08-2010, 06:25 AM
Ore is kinda...not a good thing to say. Very few people actually use it as it's a little gruff and rude. Boku works better for a guy.

Yes, ore is definitely not polite, but given the situation, because the guy is a soldier of the invading army and it's quite a long time ago, ore would be my first choice. Unless he is sensitive/well mannered/from a good family, he wouldn't use boku, which is rather on the boyish and cute side.


I deliberated on the "ai suru" as well. I originally used "suki," because it's more common to use "suki" for "love." Then I decided to pull out a dictionary that has full phrases and see some examples, and from the examples given it seemed like sentences with this particular sentiment were always using "ai" as opposed to "suki." They also use "ai" in movies and television often, so it's not exactly uncommon. I think the difference is that "ai" implies more of a passionate love, which is why I ended up going with it instead. Everything basically depends on the feeling trying to be conveyed, so I basically inferred haha.

I believe I have been out-Japanesed. ;)

Not at all :)

The problem with aisuru in this usage is that for Gwendy's character it would be a relatively new, pompous, and literary word.

Ai came into use only in the late 19th century, as a direct translation of love. In the Meiji era the Japanese were made to believe that they didn't have an exact equivalent for the Western term "love" (the concept which still lingers and contributes to the image of Japan as "totally different"). Writers and other intellectuals of the time believed that words like omou 思う, or koisuru 恋する, or shitau 慕う, or nasake 情け, are either too old-fashioned, or inappropriate to convey the more sublime meanings and shades of the word "love". Hence the usage of ai in the phrases for parental love, love of one's country, love of humanity, God's love, love of things or nature, or platonic love. Actually, this is the basic definition of ai - a wide word for love which is not (only) sexual.

That's why I wouldn't use it, not in this context. I'd use omou, which to the character would be old, shy and familiar ;)

kaitie
03-08-2010, 06:29 PM
You know, I didn't even think of the historical context there. I also haven't heard nasake. That's really interesting. It's also funny the way impressions of a character based on a single line differ among people. Even for an old gruff soldier, the line itself is pretty...girly? Not quite the word I'm looking for. A sensitive lovey-dovey line, the way I was seeing it. Good points, and I wouldn't have thought of most of that. I learned something! Love is one of those really difficult words to translate into Japanese most of the time just because there are so many ways of expressing it. It's very straightforward in English...but then again, not much is straightforward in Japanese, is it!

Thanks for the clarification. :)