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LOG
03-02-2010, 09:19 AM
Is he not capable of some disgusting stuff? I just read his 'A young beautiful nymph goes to bed (http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Texts/nymphbed.html),' I thought it would be some cutesy piece, boy was I in for a shock...

Poem's gotta be in my top fifty of most disgusting pieces of literature I've ever read.

Medievalist
03-02-2010, 09:48 AM
You need to keep reading. Swift is primarily writing satire; the point of satire is to rail about something that needs correction.

maxmordon
03-02-2010, 09:58 AM
I read Gulliver's Travels a while ago and I must say Medievalist is right. Also, it's a great satire about human institutions and the comparisions between countries with different levels of developing.

ad_lucem
03-02-2010, 10:04 AM
Is he not capable of some disgusting stuff? I just read his 'A young beautiful nymph goes to bed (http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Texts/nymphbed.html),' I thought it would be some cutesy piece, boy was I in for a shock...

Poem's gotta be in my top fifty of most disgusting pieces of literature I've ever read.

I take it you've yet to come across A Modest Proposal.

I love Swift :)

ad_lucem
03-02-2010, 10:10 AM
I read Gulliver's Travels a while ago and I must say Medievalist is right. Also, it's a great satire about human institutions and the comparisions between countries with different levels of developing.

I like to picture Swift, Twain, Vonnegut, Douglas Adams, and Voltaire gazing at all of us unlucky-still-living-souls from some atheists' version of Elysium and having a good, long, perhaps eternal laugh at our expense.

LOG
03-02-2010, 06:26 PM
I know it's satirical, but that doesn't make it any less disgusting for me.

maxmordon
03-02-2010, 06:47 PM
I like to picture Swift, Twain, Vonnegut, Douglas Adams, and Voltaire gazing at all of us unlucky-still-living-souls from some atheists' version of Elysium and having a good, long, perhaps eternal laugh at our expense.

Borges imagined that heaven would be some kind of library, I like to think that way too but a library of people where one can have fascinating endless conversations with the great and not so great minds of humanity.


But away, I am a dreamweaver, but I am not the only one...

LOG
03-02-2010, 07:06 PM
I like to imagine I can ask or otherwise somehow come back to life where and whenever I want, with my memories intact.

Millicent M'Lady
03-02-2010, 07:10 PM
I recently read a whole piece called A Modest Proposal (http://art-bin.com/art/omodest.html) by Swift which advocated eating babies to curtail the number of begging children. I think somebody linked to it here on AW. It was a fantastic piece of satire, more so because of the gruesomeness.

ad_lucem
03-02-2010, 08:15 PM
Borges imagined that heaven would be some kind of library, I like to think that way too but a library of people where one can have fascinating endless conversations with the great and not so great minds of humanity.


But away, I am a dreamweaver, but I am not the only one...

That's a fine idea, so long as the library catalogs the politicians, TV preachers, celebrities a la Lohan et al, pundits, and other undesirables in such a way that the rest of us 1) know where they are 2) are not in close proximity to them 3) can avoid them for all eternity.

Medievalist
03-02-2010, 09:57 PM
I recently read a whole piece called A Modest Proposal (http://art-bin.com/art/omodest.html) by Swift which advocated eating babies to curtail the number of begging children. I think somebody linked to it here on AW. It was a fantastic piece of satire, more so because of the gruesomeness.

That's one of the keys to satire, especially in terms of English literature from the eighteenth century and the classical models that inspired it.

The idea is to so gross out, offend, shock or horrify the reader that they get up off their arses and do something about it. Swift's A Modest Proposal actually helped get monies to Ireland where children and adults were starving to death--in part because much of the food was shipped to England.

Way back in the early 1990s I used "A Modest Proposal" as a text in an undergraduate English intro to Lit class (it's a really really common text in such classes).

Two students instead of coming to class on the day assigned to discuss the work, complained to the dean that I was "anti-Irish" for assigning the text. They missed the entire point, and took it quite literally.

ad_lucem
03-02-2010, 10:03 PM
Two students instead of coming to class on the day assigned to discuss the work, complained to the dean that I was "anti-Irish" for assigning the text. They missed the entire point, and took it quite literally.

:roll:You filthy, baby-killing cannibal, you.

maxmordon
03-02-2010, 10:39 PM
That's a fine idea, so long as the library catalogs the politicians, TV preachers, celebrities a la Lohan et al, pundits, and other undesirables in such a way that the rest of us 1) know where they are 2) are not in close proximity to them 3) can avoid them for all eternity.

I heard a certain signore Alighieri wrote a fanfic that seems a rather splendid idea where to put such type of individuals.

LOG
03-02-2010, 11:39 PM
Two students instead of coming to class on the day assigned to discuss the work, complained to the dean that I was "anti-Irish" for assigning the text. They missed the entire point, and took it quite literally.
I have to ask, how did the dean take it?