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ricketybridge
02-19-2010, 04:09 AM
Hi everyone,

For any artists or anyone who's studied art: what's the worst advice on fine art painting you ever got??? Abstract or otherwise, technique, composition, color, whatever. Ideally something that you actually thought was true at first, but then realized was making your painting worse.

Thanks!

-rickety

Canotila
02-19-2010, 05:49 AM
I'm still not sure if it was bad advice or not, but I had a painting teacher who forbade us from using phthalo blue. According to her, it "contaminated" paintings. She loathed it with a passion, and we were told that if we used it we wouldn't get credit for that painting.

I was almost in deep doo doo for one assignment. We had to pick a famous painting and try to reproduce it. I picked one by Mort Kunstler, which was heavy in bluish green. Since I couldn't use phthalo blue I mixed prussian blue and cadmium yellow. I will never forget the look on her face when she walked by my canvas. I had to sit down with her, my paints, and show her exactly how I managed to get that hue without using phthalo.

To this day, I still don't really use it just out of habit. That, and I didn't own any.

ricketybridge
02-19-2010, 05:58 AM
LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Oh my lord how freakin' random!!!! Wow, thanks for the idea! :O

backslashbaby
02-19-2010, 06:58 AM
That is a good one. There is a lot of debate about the best white, too. You can find many blog posts dedicated to the subject [keywords 'titanium white' to start] :)

For me, one teacher always wanted 'more texture,' which really didn't seem to fit in a lot of my stuff imo. But it was a graded class, so I did it her way.

smcc360
02-19-2010, 08:16 PM
Hi everyone,

For any artists or anyone who's studied art: what's the worst advice on fine art painting you ever got???

'Go ahead; take it. The guard's not looking'.

veinglory
02-19-2010, 09:25 PM
"Never use black"

Stanmiller
02-19-2010, 10:05 PM
The worst?

"Don't waste your talent on trying that Jackson Pollock stuff. It'll never sell."

Oh, yeah?

maryland
02-20-2010, 01:35 AM
Told to draw it out first in charcoal.
You have to then dust off most of your drawing(clouds of black grit) and then start oil-painting over the drawing.
The brush picks up the deep black residue and messes up the pure colours.Instant muddiness.
Otherwise, you have to spray the charcoal drawing with fixative, which destroys the integrity of building up the layers of paint, which have to progress from lean (mostly turpentine) to fat (with more oils).

sunandshadow
02-20-2010, 01:45 AM
Almost every piece of advice stated as, "REAL artists do X." Real watercolor artists don't use white. Real marker artists don't use crayola or roseart markers, only copics. Real painters use oils, not acrylics, they use long-handled brushes, not short, they use stretched canvas, not canvasboards or gessoboards, and they don't cut the tips off their brushes to make them stiffer. Real sculptors use earthenware clay, not polymer clay. Real artists don't mix media and don't use any kind of new tool or chemical.

Canotila
02-20-2010, 03:34 AM
Almost every piece of advice stated as, "REAL artists do X." Real watercolor artists don't use white. Real marker artists don't use crayola or roseart markers, only copics. Real painters use oils, not acrylics, they use long-handled brushes, not short, they use stretched canvas, not canvasboards or gessoboards, and they don't cut the tips off their brushes to make them stiffer. Real sculptors use earthenware clay, not polymer clay. Real artists don't mix media and don't use any kind of new tool or chemical.

^^^^ This! Real artists do whatever works, with what they have available. ;) In the past it has been cheaper to stretch your own canvas, which is the main reason people did it.

Kind of unrelated, but aren't short handled brushes made specifically for watercolors? Maybe not, sometimes I get weird ideas in my head out of nowhere.

I remember always looking at Mucha's work with mixed envy and despair. Somehow I always pictured him in his studio, half nude model posed in front of him as he created beautiful pieces out of nothing. I got a book about him, and it turns out he had thousands of reference photographs in files. Whenever he needed a human figure for a piece he would go through the files, and then enlarge the image with a grid. I felt so much better after learning that.

backslashbaby
02-20-2010, 03:53 AM
Ah, yes! You aren't a real artist unless you use archival quality materials. No matter the cost, every piece you work on needs to be preserved for history.

sunandshadow
02-20-2010, 04:05 AM
Kind of unrelated, but aren't short handled brushes made specifically for watercolors? Maybe not, sometimes I get weird ideas in my head out of nowhere.
Well, basically short handled brushes are supposed to be for small projects where you can rest your forearm on the table next to the paper, and long handled ones for large projects where you might want big smooth brush strokes. Usually, but not always, watercolor works are done on fairly small pieces of paper and other kinds of painting on larger canvases or walls. But you're right that usually you only find short-handled brushes available for watercolor and for craft uses.

BigWords
02-20-2010, 08:45 PM
Keep in mind that some art teachers separate materials into proper and improper tools. I've been told that using fine sand (the quality stuff) mixed in with oils is an aberration to the eye, and even certain brands of paint are "unsuitable" - yet more random madness from people who deem their opinion of art to be better than everyone else. When I think of the dumb stuff which the "real" art world comes up with I always come back to a television show in which Brian Sewell lavished praise on a painting done by an elephant.

Tepelus
02-20-2010, 09:28 PM
My art teacher taught me nothing. No art history, techniques, nothing. She would give us a picture and told us to draw it. Or a hunk of clay and make something. I pretty much self-taught myself anything art. Now, I don't even scribble, which is a shame. My avatar was drawn when I was a senior in high school, 15 years ago. A couple years out of high school I continued to draw, but stopped. Just lost interest. And patience. The older I get, the less patient I become.

Kitty
02-21-2010, 04:11 AM
Hi everyone,

For any artists or anyone who's studied art: what's the worst advice on fine art painting you ever got??? Abstract or otherwise, technique, composition, color, whatever. Ideally something that you actually thought was true at first, but then realized was making your painting worse.

Thanks!

-rickety



That titanium white can do the same thing as zinc white.... I've heard the same thing about phthalo blue and prussian blue.

oh...and that real artist don't use black or white....

RobinGBrown
02-22-2010, 12:33 PM
_Real_ artists use Macs

abctriplets
02-23-2010, 03:50 AM
_Real_ artists use Macs

The OP asked for bad advice...