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View Full Version : I'm going to try a frivolous, humorous experiment with language and accents...



Jcomp
02-19-2010, 02:07 AM
In the Curling thread I was introduced to the British slang usage of the word "pants." Which is to say something is lame or uncool, the equivalent to good ol' urban-American "wack." Around my office and amongst my friends and fam I'm known for throwing out a few random foreign phrases I've picked up here & there, plus incorporating my own personal weird jargon, which mostly comprises abundant use of the word jazz.

So I thought for a moment that I would like to incorporate "pants" into my repertoire. but then I got an even better idea. I'm just going to make up slang and throw a British accent on it and see if it slides. Because if I start using "pants" people are going to think I'm making it up anyway, so why not actually make some stuff up and lie about it having a British origin? So now I'm beginning the process of choosing which words will sound best and what meanings I will assign to them.

I have no idea why, I just felt like sharing this. I'm rather looking forward to reaching the implementation phase of this project...

Chris P
02-19-2010, 02:14 AM
All British slang sounds fun. My Brit friends laugh at me when I use Britisms with my American accent. They say it doesn't sound like swear words when I say them.

Jcomp
02-19-2010, 02:19 AM
All British slang sounds fun. My Brit friends laugh at me when I use Britisms with my American accent. They say it doesn't sound like swear words when I say them.

Ha. I think that's because they make swear words out of normal words. "Bloody" is not meant to be a curse word, it's a description of unappetizing steaks and Tarantino movies. I think throwing the right kind of British accent on almost any word can make it sound like a curse. It's an awesome opportunity...

Chris P
02-19-2010, 02:20 AM
Ha. I think that's because they make swear words out of normal words. "Bloody" is not meant to be a curse word, it's a description of unappetizing steaks and Tarantino movies. I think throwing the right kind of British accent on almost any word can make it sound like a curse. It's an awesome opportunity...

My pronunciation of "bollocks" gets them giggling every time.

Shakesbear
02-19-2010, 02:21 AM
'a British accent' - I didn't realize that there was such a thing - it could be more fun if you did regional dialects - you would have a much wider scope as well...

Chris P
02-19-2010, 02:22 AM
'a British accent' - I didn't realize that there was such a thing - it could be more fun if you did regional dialects - you would have a much wider scope as well...

Americans recognize two British dialects: Harry Potter and Monty Python.

FACT (might not be fact)

BenPanced
02-19-2010, 02:24 AM
Three, actually: Queen Elizabeth.

Shakesbear
02-19-2010, 02:27 AM
Three, actually: Queen Elizabeth.

The first or the second one?

Wonder how many American accents are recognised this side of the pond?

Jcomp
02-19-2010, 02:27 AM
Pretty much. Similarly, I always thought the rest of the world only recognized the American dialects of John Wayne and Random Angry New Yorker...

Shakesbear
02-19-2010, 02:28 AM
Wouldn't you have to be really old to remember John Wayne?

Chris P
02-19-2010, 02:29 AM
Wouldn't you have to be really old to remember John Wayne?

Whotchit, Pilgrum!

Shakesbear
02-19-2010, 02:34 AM
Aw c'mon! The geezer kicked the bucket in '79!

Mr Flibble
02-19-2010, 02:40 AM
Ha. I think that's because they make swear words out of normal words. "Bloody" is not meant to be a curse word, it's a description of unappetizing steaks and Tarantino movies.

Tis so!


perhaps it ultimately is connected with bloods in the slang sense of "rowdy young aristocrats" (see blood (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=blood)) via expressions such as bloody drunk "as drunk as a blood."


Pretty much. Similarly, I always thought the rest of the world only recognized the American dialects of John Wayne and Random Angry New Yorker...


I recognise a few. I know I needed a sodding phrase book in Miami - I had to use sign language to buys some stamps. She couldn't understand me, I couldn't understand her.

Just say you're off down the battle for a few Rays. That'll confuse them :D

BTW "pants" is old hat now.

backslashbaby
02-19-2010, 02:42 AM
The first or the second one?

Wonder how many American accents are recognised this side of the pond?

Y'all do better than us because you are always watching American TV and movies.

As a result, y'all are clueless about a real Southern accent, too :D

For the OP, what is that term over there for playing an instrument for money? I can never remember it, but it always sounds quite dirty to me :D

Mr Flibble
02-19-2010, 02:43 AM
Busking?

backslashbaby
02-19-2010, 02:44 AM
That's it!

You busking eejit :D (Irish is even more fun!)

Shakesbear
02-19-2010, 02:49 AM
Y'all do better than us because you are always watching American TV and movies.

As a result, y'all are clueless about a real Southern accent, too :D

For the OP, what is that term over there for playing an instrument for money? I can never remember it, but it always sounds quite dirty to me :D


Um... not so! I have friends (yes, really!) in Baton Rouge and we chat on the phone so I get an earful of real Southern accent.

Chris P
02-19-2010, 02:54 AM
Um... not so! I have friends (yes, really!) in Baton Rouge and we chat on the phone so I get an earful of real Southern accent.

Well... You get a lot of cajun in Baton Rouge, which is quite a bit different from the surrounding accents.

To me, cajun sounds a lot like Boston; dropped Rs and all.

Shakesbear
02-19-2010, 02:56 AM
I'll run that past my friends next time we chat and baffle them with my new found knowledge! Thanks.

Jcomp
02-19-2010, 02:56 AM
Um... not so! I have friends (yes, really!) in Baton Rouge and we chat on the phone so I get an earful of real Southern accent.

The interesting thing there is that Louisiana alone has a few variations on a U.S. Southern accent. The south is a bizarre gumbo of curious dialects, especially in areas where "southern" meets "country."

Shakesbear
02-19-2010, 03:03 AM
Language is fascinating! My friends in London tell me I am starting to sound like I'm from Norfolk and not London. My friends in Norfolk think I am from Suffolk (county next door). The friends in Baton Rouge think I'm an alien!

Do you want some Norfolk dialect words? For example "don't pingle!"

backslashbaby
02-19-2010, 03:08 AM
When I was a very little girl, I had the accent of my Scandinavian preschool teacher. It influenced my accent for years and years! I lived in Chicago at the time. Go figure :)

Mr Flibble
02-19-2010, 03:14 AM
Do you want some Norfolk dialect words? For example "don't pingle!"

*notes to use at work tomorrow*

Want a sussex one?

I was in the twitten and a jasper got me.

Twitten - from 'betwixt and between' Sussex for narrow alley between two houses, like so ( actually the real twitten part isn't in the picture - the two houses join up over the top where I was standing when I took the pic:)

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n83/spinynorman_2006/lane.jpg


Of course, we all know what a jasper is, right?

Sophia
02-19-2010, 03:18 AM
I had a dream the other night that I had a few jaspers on me and couldn't brush them off.

That sounds rude, but it's not!

Xelebes
02-19-2010, 03:21 AM
My dad is Canadian all the way but uses "bloody" and "ninny" as the only swearwords he will ever use. He's unique like that.

dolores haze
02-19-2010, 03:22 AM
I have recently introduced the word "faffing" to my American workplace. Everybody's using it now, but with an American tinge - e.g. "quit faffing."

ad_lucem
02-19-2010, 03:28 AM
Not true about only knowing Harry Potter and Pythonese. Thanks to various UK comedy acts I have become familiar with the Chavish dialect, which if I'm not mistaken, is quite similar to an American wankster.

Also, thanks to these here internets, I am aware that there are places in the UK (an allegedly English-speaking country) where not one bit of discernible English can be heard in common use.

Which makes me kind of happy to know, because we're not all that different afterall :)

benbradley
02-19-2010, 04:06 AM
For most of this year so far, I've associated the word "Pants" with the three words "on the ground." It's an automatic and instantaneous response, I can't help it.

All this and I never watch TV - There's absolutely no reason to nowadays, as all modern cultural references end up on Youtube within hours.

Oh, and you want to see some already-established jargon (it appears your real goal is making up words or word usages yourself, but it's a source of odd things you might could re-purpose...), here's this:
http://catb.org/jargon/

Jcomp
02-19-2010, 04:16 AM
Faffing? Pingle? In the twitten and a jasper got me? I'm starting to think there's no words or phrases I can make up more bizarre and awesome than what already exists. This is fascinating...

poetinahat
02-19-2010, 04:26 AM
BTW "pants" is old hat now.

Plus, it's naff...


To me, cajun sounds a lot like Boston; dropped Rs and all.

"He's having trouble getting his tongue 'round his R's..."
-- Captain Peacock, from Are You Being Served?

Shakesbear
02-19-2010, 07:21 AM
Faffing? Pingle? In the twitten and a jasper got me? I'm starting to think there's no words or phrases I can make up more bizarre and awesome than what already exists. This is fascinating...

Ahhh depends on hows you goes about it. Long long ago I used to play Scrabble with a twist - you had to use the letters to make up words and you had to ascribe a meaning to the word you invented. The only word I can remember is 'pegilean' and the meaning was that part of a quay where one legged sailors were allowed to lean and rest their peg leg. Daft but fun.

CACTUSWENDY
02-19-2010, 07:30 AM
Heard the star of Harry Potter in an interview and he said he was amazed that in American the word Pissed (pissing) means ......and in UK it means drunk. lol

poetinahat
02-19-2010, 07:34 AM
Oh, and if you find yourself in Australia, talking about sports: please bear in mind that "rooting" means something quite different.

ad_lucem
02-19-2010, 08:27 AM
Heard the star of Harry Potter in an interview and he said he was amazed that in American the word Pissed (pissing) means ......and in UK it means drunk. lol

Well, if you're the sort that can be classified as an "angry drunk" then I suppose there's really not much difference in the definitions from one side of the Atlantic to t'other.

ad_lucem
02-19-2010, 08:33 AM
Oh, and if you find yourself in Australia, talking about sports: please bear in mind that "rooting" means something quite different.

Had to look that up (found it here (http://www.koalanet.com.au/australian-slang.html) for other curious non-Australians such as myself).

Rooting for a team :roll:apparently takes on a meaning more along the lines of Debbie Does Dallas... which, I guess you could say, is a much more enthusiastic way of expressing one's love for a particular sport.

Priene
02-19-2010, 09:34 AM
I'm rather looking forward to reaching the implementation phase of this project...

That is well nang innit.

Xelebes
02-19-2010, 10:20 AM
That is well nang innit.

What this bellend said.

Mr Flibble
02-19-2010, 11:29 AM
What this bellend said.

'Ere, watch it mucker, or I'll get a cob on.

Shakesbear
02-19-2010, 12:23 PM
Innit. Sigh ... nuff said.

Priene
02-19-2010, 01:18 PM
What this bellend said.

You're aving a larf. Do you want some?

ad_lucem
02-19-2010, 01:29 PM
*adjusting pith helmet*

*sits down on a convenient rock out of view*

Fascinating....

*scribbles notes in the margins of a battered field journal*

Absolutely fascinating...

Priene
02-19-2010, 01:38 PM
Absolutely fascinating...

You int from around hair are ya bor?

Fran
02-19-2010, 01:49 PM
"Pants" is old hat and naff? :eek: Oh, well. That pretty much describes me perfectly...

If you want a bit of Scots, Jcomp, start calling idiots "doughheids". It's easily pronouncable by the non-Scot and it's good fun to say.

Priene
02-19-2010, 01:54 PM
Naff is definitely old hat. You couldn't be more 1988 if you went around calling everyone a wally.

Fran
02-19-2010, 02:05 PM
Naff is definitely old hat. You couldn't be more 1988 if you went around calling everyone a wally.

I much prefer "walloper" to "wally". I never say either, but "walloper" always makes me giggle.

Mr Flibble
02-19-2010, 05:48 PM
If you want a bit of Scots, Jcomp, start calling idiots "doughheids".

Who you calling a dougheid? Ya bampot!

Fran
02-19-2010, 06:32 PM
Who you calling a dougheid? Ya bampot!

You're no' a doughheid. You're no' really an idiot. An' Ah'll pure chib anyone who says ye ur. :D

Mr Flibble
02-19-2010, 06:42 PM
Oh, 'ark at her, she's all fur coat and no knickers.


:D

Ok not really

*runs away before she gets chibbed*

ad_lucem
02-19-2010, 06:44 PM
You int from around hair are ya bor?

*tries to blend into native foliage*

Mr Flibble
02-19-2010, 06:48 PM
*tries to blend into native foliage*

*hoists shotgun*


Get orf moi laaand!

Oh, wow, Viz flashback....

Tors
02-19-2010, 07:17 PM
im from sheffield and most of sheffield and my area of yorkshire speak in a completely different language to everyone else if you want to see an example get yourself a copy of a film called The Full Monty (filmed in sheffield but not with strong sheffield accent) and Kes (filmed in Barnsley where i struggled to understand my patients) or listen to a band called Artic Monkeys.

i dont speak like this, but my brother does and we grew up in the same house - strange.

sen = self (so people say mysen although my is pronounced mi, although misen could become thisen (as we sometimes refer to ourselves as plural) yasen - yourself could also be theesen)
mardy (noone understood this prior to the artic monkeys)= grumpy
peppy = mardy
rate = really (thats rate good, some areas pronounce it reet - but that annoys me)
lob = throw
nowt = nothing
owt = anything
aye = yes
one of my favourite yorkshire words nesh (that noone else seems to understand) = some who feels the cold.

the way things are pronounced are completely different too
over is pronounced ovva
down is pronounced dahn
thee (pronouced the) is still used but not as you would expect eg is thee gona do summat bout that?
now is pronoucned nah
some things i do which, annoy me,
dropping the word the - going to (the) shop, on (the) side. i didn't even know i did it until i got to uni lol.
refer to myself as a plural i say us when i mean me
i'm sure theres many more i do which i'm not aware of.

heres something fun for you http://www.whoohoo.co.uk/yorkshire-translator.asp

Jcomp
02-19-2010, 07:24 PM
I feel embiggened by the cromulent attention this thread's received, that's for true...

Mr Flibble
02-19-2010, 07:28 PM
I feel embiggened

*glances down*

Yes, I can see that.







Sorry, but gods dammit it was begging for it.....

quickWit
02-19-2010, 07:31 PM
Sorry, but gods dammit it was begging for it.....

Yeah, that's generally not an acceptable defense. Trust me. :)

Carry on.

Fran
02-19-2010, 07:39 PM
Oh, 'ark at her, she's all fur coat and no knickers.


:D

Ok not really

*runs away before she gets chibbed*

Ah huvnae go' a fur coat. (Coat in Glasgow is pronounced "coh-wit", to rhyme with "boh-wit" :ROFL:). Ah huv git knickers. You're a' mooth an' nae troosers.

Jcomp, Jcomp, Jcomp, best Scottish chat-up line for you! "Ah 'hink you're a pure darlin', by the way." It's worked on me. Oh wait, no it hasn't... ;)

Perks
02-19-2010, 07:46 PM
I love to hear a Glaswegian say the word 'imbecile'. Sounds like they'll damn near swallow their tongue.

ad_lucem
02-19-2010, 07:53 PM
You know, did it ever occur to you folks that y'all have too many cool accents per capita?

I mean, you've got 60-some million people and how many accents??

We've got 300-some million and a fraction of the accents, and they're not even particularly cool for the most part.

You all need to start up some kind of accent exchange program or accent charity...

Mr Flibble
02-19-2010, 07:58 PM
You're a' mooth an' nae troosers.



Oh, hen, ye's after a pagger? Or is't all just argy bargy? Ah, dinae fash yasen





I mean, you've got 60-some million people and how many accents?? The reason we get to have Great in our name :D

Perks
02-19-2010, 08:02 PM
What I like is Welsh road signs.

http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s40/Perks_album/welsh_englishsign.jpg

And it sounds to me just like that when they speak. Like gargling with nodding and hand gestures.

Priene
02-19-2010, 08:03 PM
You all need to start up some kind of accent exchange program or accent charity...

You can have Brummie, Cheshire and Eshtuary for free.

Priene
02-19-2010, 08:04 PM
http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s40/Perks_album/welsh_englishsign.jpg



Slow you down. (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/2661230/Norfolk-village-tells-drivers-Slow-You-Down.html)

Perks
02-19-2010, 08:13 PM
I like it. It will work because you have to slow down to untangle the sentiment. I am an Anglophile, no doubt about it.

ad_lucem
02-19-2010, 08:15 PM
You can have Brummie, Cheshire and Eshtuary for free.

Um, thanks.. I think...um...

Fran
02-19-2010, 08:42 PM
Um, thanks.. I think...um...

Ozzy Osbourne's a Brummie (from Birmingham) if it helps, but he's hardly representative. :D (Cat Deeley used to be but I noticed when she was on telly the other night she's lost most of her accent.) Who's famous from Cheshire? Um... um... Estuary? Um... um... Come on, Priene, we need to give the lady examples.

ad_lucem
02-19-2010, 08:54 PM
Ozzy Osbourne's a Brummie (from Birmingham) if it helps, but he's hardly representative. :D (Cat Deeley used to be but I noticed when she was on telly the other night she's lost most of her accent.) Who's famous from Cheshire? Um... um... Estuary? Um... um... Come on, Priene, we need to give the lady examples.

Ozzy? Did he have this accent before or after he became a drug-addled reality TV star?

Mr Flibble
02-19-2010, 08:57 PM
Before and after

Hmm Eshtuary - Jamie Oliver? Nah, that's Mockney, like, innit, well sorted. Can't think of any off the top of my head. ETA: No wait, of course! David Beckham.

Tors
02-19-2010, 08:58 PM
I didnt know Cat Deely was a brummie!

ad_lucem
02-19-2010, 09:12 PM
Before and after



Oh, okay, I always thought he was suffering from some form of aphasia.

Priene
02-19-2010, 09:14 PM
BBC Voices (http://www.bbc.co.uk/voices/). It's a national treasure.

Gretad08
02-19-2010, 09:23 PM
Just my .02 :) :

A regular bank customer from England was standing in line and the teller said "Hey long time no see. Get your fanny over here!"

He turned ten shades of red trying to explain that fanny meant something different in his hometown.

Mr Flibble
02-19-2010, 09:26 PM
I'm sure I recall an anecdote re Liz Taylor and Richard Burton. Director told him to 'grab her fanny'. He did what he thought he'd been told....

Fran
02-19-2010, 09:40 PM
A classic Scottish song (http://www.mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=7986).

To the tune of "She'll Be Coming Round The Mountain".

I'm available to translate if required. :D

Perks
02-19-2010, 10:15 PM
Jcomp, if you're going to create British-like slang, make sure it's mostly about testicles. Limeys seem as obsessed with balls as yer average Jersey guy.

Fran
02-19-2010, 10:20 PM
Jcomp, if you're going to create British-like slang, make sure it's mostly about testicles. Limeys seem as obsessed with balls as yer average Jersey guy.

You're right. "Bawbag" is a favourite Scottish insult. :D

darkprincealain
02-19-2010, 10:37 PM
I liked Cat Deeley when she first appeared on the air over here as the host of So You Think You Can Dance?, but her accent has softened over the seasons.

Can't think of any interesting tidbits of slang from around here, but if I do, I'll pop back by.

Maxinquaye
02-19-2010, 10:44 PM
Ah hev a lot iv fun playin aroond wi' british acccents. ah me'sel soond bonny boring; a haggard breed iv scandinavian schyeul standard english wi' a lot iv americanisms throon in.

Accents are much more important here than in many places.

Xelebes
02-19-2010, 11:13 PM
'Ere, watch it mucker, or I'll get a cob on.

switches to Canadian slang

Well, well look at this hoser. If ya keep it up, I might treat you to a tecker's supper.

semilargeintestine
02-19-2010, 11:15 PM
Probably no one will say anything. I do this all the time with weird accents and slang. I even went an entire meal using a ridiculous Arnold Schwarzenegger accent, and the waitress didn't even blink. Most people don't pay attention to the way you speak.

Fran
02-19-2010, 11:21 PM
Probably no one will say anything. I do this all the time with weird accents and slang. I even went an entire meal using a ridiculous Arnold Schwarzenegger accent, and the waitress didn't even blink. Most people don't pay attention to the way you speak.

I don't know. I suspect I'd get asked to repeat myself a lot. I do in Englanderland anyway, and my accent's not even especially strong. :)

Rose English
02-19-2010, 11:38 PM
I'm declaring this homesickness in a thread.


I have recently introduced the word "faffing" to my American workplace. Everybody's using it now, but with an American tinge - e.g. "quit faffing."

Faffing, pottering, two of my favourite pastimes.


Naff is definitely old hat. You couldn't be more 1988 if you went around calling everyone a wally.
:ROFL:


*hoists shotgun*


Get orf moi laaand!

Oh, wow, Viz flashback....

Double whammy when I hadn't recovered...:roll:


I love to hear a Glaswegian say the word 'imbecile'. Sounds like they'll damn near swallow their tongue.

Not that they were Glaswegian, but I was shopping in Kroger yesterday and heard that '1000 mile' song by those Scottish twins from Aberdeen or Dundee ;) or somewhere. Couldn't help wondering if anyone in the store understood it but me. (Rep point if you know who I'm on about)

Here a reference to the UK means University of Kentucky. I had some interesting cross conversations when we first moved here :rant:

Oo! My first derail. Sorry jcomp.

ad_lucem
02-20-2010, 01:35 AM
I'm declaring this homesickness in a thread.



Faffing, pottering, two of my favourite pastimes.


:ROFL:



Double whammy when I hadn't recovered...:roll:



Not that they were Glaswegian, but I was shopping in Kroger yesterday and heard that '1000 mile' song by those Scottish twins from Aberdeen or Dundee ;) or somewhere. Couldn't help wondering if anyone in the store understood it but me. (Rep point if you know who I'm on about)

Here a reference to the UK means University of Kentucky. I had some interesting cross conversations when we first moved here :rant:

Oo! My first derail. Sorry jcomp.

The Proclaimers, one hit wonders from the late 80's/early 90's...wrote I'm Gonna Be which was featured in the movie Benny and Joon...which means that a google search of this video includes Depp...the oh-so-drool-worthy Depp.

Not rep diving, just pointing out to all the females on the board that there is Deppage involved in the music video for this oddly cool song.

Jcomp
02-20-2010, 02:23 AM
Probably no one will say anything. I do this all the time with weird accents and slang. I even went an entire meal using a ridiculous Arnold Schwarzenegger accent, and the waitress didn't even blink. Most people don't pay attention to the way you speak.

Interesting. Very interesting. I always wanted to go to a club and hit on girls using an accent and pretending to be from somewhere exceedingly unlikely.

Shakesbear
02-20-2010, 02:27 AM
Deppage? hmph I'd like for to quackle 'im!

ad_lucem
02-20-2010, 02:33 AM
Deppage? hmph I'd like for to quackle 'im!

Each to their own taste...quackle...now there's a word...

Fran
02-20-2010, 02:44 AM
Interesting. Very interesting. I always wanted to go to a club and hit on girls using an accent and pretending to be from somewhere exceedingly unlikely.

Talk in clicks and whistles and say you're from space! I'd love it! :D

backslashbaby
02-20-2010, 02:45 AM
What accent does Paul McCartney's ex have? I had a classmate in England who couldn't understand me who swore she had no accent [lol!] who had that one but stronger.

It took me forever to figure out what a "hehtch" was in her filename.





You know, like "Hehtch"-E-L-L-O? :D

Shakesbear
02-20-2010, 02:58 AM
Each to their own taste...quackle...now there's a word...


Yes, indeed each to their own taste!

And if quackle be a word - 'ow bout nonicking?

Fran
02-20-2010, 03:10 AM
What accent does Paul McCartney's ex have? I had a classmate in England who couldn't understand me who swore she had no accent [lol!] who had that one but stronger.

Heather Mills is a Geordie, which is a nickname for people from Newcastle. Newcastle-upon-Tyne to give it its Sunday name. :)

ad_lucem
02-20-2010, 03:11 AM
Yes, indeed each to their own taste!

And if quackle be a word - 'ow bout nonicking?



It sounds like something that might very well be illegal in most of the contiguous U.S. with the exception of San Francisco and certain portions of New York City.

Priene
02-20-2010, 09:58 AM
Heather Mills is a Geordie, which is a nickname for people from Newcastle. Newcastle-upon-Tyne to give it its Sunday name. :)

Nah. She grew up in Usworth, which makes her more a Mackem than a Geordie.

Shakesbear
02-20-2010, 11:54 AM
It sounds like something that might very well be illegal in most of the contiguous U.S. with the exception of San Francisco and certain portions of New York City.

I suppose ite depends on the type of nonicking! We do need to mardle 'bout that!

Fran
02-20-2010, 06:06 PM
Nah. She grew up in Usworth, which makes her more a Mackem than a Geordie.

GAH! What's the current penalty for classing a Mackem as a Geordie? Is it still Death By Newkie Brown? :cry:

Perks
02-20-2010, 06:53 PM
Now that makes me laugh. Liking Newcastle Brown over here in America is a sign of sophisticated appreciation of beer. And no, I'm not being sarcastic. I looked into the social status of Newkie Brown after I watched this (my writing partner is in Norfolk, so he explains things to me) -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4AgzQvFNZs

Fran
02-20-2010, 07:29 PM
Now that makes me laugh. Liking Newcastle Brown over here in America is a sign of sophisticated appreciation of beer. And no, I'm not being sarcastic. I looked into the social status of Newkie Brown after I watched this (my writing partner is in Norfolk, so he explains things to me) -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4AgzQvFNZs

I can't bear the stuff. The only time I've tried it, it hit my stomach and came straight back up again. Same with Guiness. I'm such a lightweight. :D

Perks
02-20-2010, 08:11 PM
I'm not a fan either. And the only time I've liked Guinness is straight from the vat inside the Dublin brewery. I took the tour to be a good sport and it turned out to be pretty interesting. The fresher the beer, apparently, the better. It was much tastier on site.

Priene
02-20-2010, 08:47 PM
GAH! What's the current penalty for classing a Mackem as a Geordie? Is it still Death By Newkie Brown? :cry:

It's about on the same level as calling someone from Edinburgh a Weegie. Or a Black Country man a Brummie. Probably OK, but might get you duffed up in the wrong place. The generic term for Geordie, Mackem, Pitmatic and Teesside is north-eastern. Which covers an awful lot, because I understand Gateshead (sonorous, beautiful) perfectly but haven't got a clue what people from Middlesbrough are talking about.

A friend of one of my relatives was told by a doctor he could either live out a natural lifespan or die within six months, depending on whether he gave up Newcastle Brown. I don't know which one he chose...

Mr Flibble
02-20-2010, 09:01 PM
hear tell there used to be a whole ward in one of the Newcastle hospitals just for people drinking too much Dog ( Newky Brown)

My boss is a Burough boy. It's always fun trying to make him swear cos it alllus comes out 'Fa FOOKS seek!'

poetinahat
02-22-2010, 04:10 AM
*hoists shotgun*


Get orf moi laaand!

Oh, wow, Viz flashback....
Howay the lads!
- Sid the Sexist ("**** oot for the lads")

Fnarrrrr!
- Finnbarr Saunders (and his double entendres)

Oo! Me Michaels!
- Nobby's Piles

Mr Flibble
02-22-2010, 05:01 AM
Buster Gonad and his unfeasibly large testicles

I was always a big fan of the Top Tips

Minor skin grafts can be performed on pigs by covering any cuts and grazes with thin strips of bacon

Thicken up runny low-fat yoghurt by stirring in a spoonful of lard


An empty aluminium cigar tube filled with angry wasps makes an inexpensive vibrator

Fran
02-23-2010, 12:05 AM
Buster Gonad and his unfeasibly large testicles

I was always a big fan of the Top Tips

Minor skin grafts can be performed on pigs by covering any cuts and grazes with thin strips of bacon

Thicken up runny low-fat yoghurt by stirring in a spoonful of lard


An empty aluminium cigar tube filled with angry wasps makes an inexpensive vibrator

Drivers - carry your petrol round with you in buckets so no one can steal your car.

Mr Flibble
02-23-2010, 12:19 AM
I've always wanted to use these:

Vegetarians coming to dinner? Simply serve them a nice bit of steak or veal. Since they`re always going on about how tofu, Quorn, meat substitute etc `tastes exactly like the real thing`, they won't know any difference.





Invited by vegetarians for dinner? Point out that since you'd no doubt be made aware of their special dietary requirements, tell them about yours, and ask for a nice steak.

ad_lucem
02-23-2010, 12:50 AM
I've always wanted to use these:

Vegetarians coming to dinner? Simply serve them a nice bit of steak or veal. Since they`re always going on about how tofu, Quorn, meat substitute etc `tastes exactly like the real thing`, they won't know any difference.





Invited by vegetarians for dinner? Point out that since you'd no doubt be made aware of their special dietary requirements, tell them about yours, and ask for a nice steak.

:D

A set of circumstances covered, once again, by my new favorite comedy act:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKTsWjbjQ8E

"It's an ethical thing...I don't think humans should be treated like this."

BwAhahahahHAahahahaa....

ETA: My eldest went through a bout of vegetarianism...thank God that's over. I've had enough miso soup, TVP, and faux sausage to last me a lifetime.

writerterri
02-23-2010, 01:49 AM
I like pufta (poofta) myself.


It's sort of like a powder puff. What a young boy would refer to another boy being a sissy.

I think I made up the word. Not sure. But I've used it.

Sophia
02-23-2010, 02:25 AM
I like pufta (poofta) myself.


It's sort of like a powder puff. What a young boy would refer to another boy being a sissy.

I think I made up the word. Not sure. But I've used it.

Eek, that sounds close to poofter/pooftah/poofta; all slang for a gay man, with a negative connotation (as far as I've known, anyway).

ad_lucem
02-23-2010, 02:35 AM
I prefer "whoopsy"...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HL_OYj7c-4&NR=1

I love De Niro... and I adore this scene. "We always knew you were a whoopsy" :D

But then "you'll always be our captain, captain"...awww....that's the way it oughta be!

aadams73
02-23-2010, 03:31 AM
Eek, that sounds close to poofter/pooftah/poofta; all slang for a gay man, with a negative connotation (as far as I've known, anyway).

Yup. And if you want rhyming slang: "Woolly Woofter."

Xelebes
02-23-2010, 03:34 AM
On the topic of derogatory words for the effete, can't beat this Canadian one: gaylord.

Or at least I think it's mostly used by Canadians. Haven't heard Americans, Aussies or Brits use it.

Fran
02-23-2010, 03:50 AM
Invited by vegetarians for dinner? Point out that since you'd no doubt be made aware of their special dietary requirements, tell them about yours, and ask for a nice steak.

Oooh, good idea! Take someone who's been vegetarian since the age of 12 (we'll use me as an example ;)) and ask them to cook something that could potentially give you lethal food poisoning. That'd teach all you omnivores a thing or two.

Now, I just made a 6lb roast chicken. I gave it 20 minutes in the oven so it should be fine. Who wants a bit? :D

poetinahat
02-23-2010, 03:58 AM
On the topic of derogatory words for the effete, can't beat this Canadian one: gaylord.

Though it may be one connotation of the word, 'Effete' doesn't quite mean 'homosexual'. (http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=effete)

And, with that, can we move away from the derogatory nicknames?

Silver King
02-23-2010, 04:25 AM
......can we move away from the derogatory nicknames?
I'll add my vote, and with that, the motion is carried.

(Thank you, Rob.)

ad_lucem
02-23-2010, 05:01 AM
Though it may be one connotation of the word, 'Effete' doesn't quite mean 'homosexual'. (http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=effete)

And, with that, can we move away from the derogatory nicknames?

Ditto the word effeminate or even transvestite. One can be straight and be one or both of those terms. BTW, didn't mean to offend.

I'm a big fan of breaking down gender roles and rules about who can love or date whom. I certainly dated both genders in my dating days. No doubt a lot of people would think it's odd or odd to admit, but I think more have done it than would own up to it.

No one is as straight or sane as first appearances might let on. It's what makes life interesting :)

Still think De Niro was adorable in drag...

writerterri
02-23-2010, 10:28 AM
Eek, that sounds close to poofter/pooftah/poofta; all slang for a gay man, with a negative connotation (as far as I've known, anyway).

oh, so that's where i might have heard it! okay, maybe I didn't make it up but when I used it in a story it was in reference to the sissy thing. I probably should take it out and put in powder puff.

writerterri
02-23-2010, 10:40 AM
ps. has nothing to do with being gay, the boy is chickening out on a dare and the other boy called him a poofta. i'm taking it out. Cause that's not how I roll. Glad I posted it.

Carry on with the game though. :tongue

Mr Flibble
02-23-2010, 06:34 PM
Um, yes, but poofta as chicken comes from the naughty usage

A better term for chicken is calling them a 'Big girl's blouse'