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AryaT92
02-11-2010, 09:56 PM
Ever since I began writing / beta-reading etc. I have found myself living differently.

I no longer watch movies for movies but I see the actors and judge them, I listen to the dialogue and imagine it written down and analyze the characters meticulously.

Movies seem to be just books with video in the back the same way music is poetry with music in the back.

Have you guys started seeing things in a new perspective after writing?

Cybernaught
02-11-2010, 10:03 PM
I am far more critical of myself, with even less self-esteem.

Phaeal
02-11-2010, 10:05 PM
It started me on a decades-long hunt for the Mystical Desk Chair of Antioch, the only one that will never make my butt or back hurt.

Still hunting.

Annayna
02-11-2010, 10:07 PM
It gets me outta the bad and into another world for a little while... Therefore when I come back to reality Im able to deal...

So all in all, its for the best me thinks :D

Ken
02-11-2010, 10:12 PM
... was sorta hoping it would, but as of yet no real changes. Maybe when/if I get something on the shelves, within the next 50,000 years, I'll undergo some sort of transformation. Will post back then.

Brandy
02-11-2010, 10:13 PM
i feel like i'm doing something i'm supposed to be doing. although i must say for the most part i don't enjoy reading as much anymore. i'm overly critical now.

willietheshakes
02-11-2010, 10:24 PM
I've always written -- it's an aspect of who I am. As a result, it hasn't "changed" me at all.

icerose
02-11-2010, 10:29 PM
I've always written but as I've gotten better and learned more about behind the scenes I'm a lot more critical of writing and movies in general. I find myself saying "Oh, that was really clever." or "Man, they really screwed that one up, the potential they just wasted..." I still read and watch movies for entertainment but the things they do right and wrong stick out a lot more. Drives my husband crazy, especially with continuity errors.

As for myself I'm actually a lot more outgoing. I'm not as shy or timid as I used to be and I'm not as afraid to share my opinion. I'm also not afraid of what people think of me anymore. Of course part of this can be attributed to the simple fact of growing up and becoming more comfortable in my own skin. I've accepted that I'm a weird person with my own quirks and a lot of people don't know how to take me and that's okay.

Beyond that the knowledge that I've made money off my writing, that several people have found my work worth paying for is a pretty big boost.

gothicangel
02-11-2010, 10:30 PM
Well I think it is what has driven me over the last few years.

It encouraged me to go to Uni, and I'm now applying for an MSc. As a consequence of that I've got work proofreading and even employment in catering and retail management.

Moonfish
02-11-2010, 11:12 PM
It has made me stronger.

And I eye everything differently. I observe details, smells, thoughts, moods, people, in a different way. I am more present in moments - except when I am plotting or thinking of a story, in which case I am lost to the world.

Mr Flibble
02-11-2010, 11:23 PM
I see less of my Old Man

I live inside my head even more than used to

Apparently I'm also a bitch to witch films with as I try and piece together backstories for all the characters and pick apart the handling of scenes and 'Huh, that character wouldn't do that!' and 'That's stupid - that plot hole right there'. Mu husband makes up for it by watching for 5 minutes and working out the twist at the end of the film.

Shadow_Ferret
02-11-2010, 11:25 PM
No. Writing hasn't changed me. But then I started writing early on, so it just became part of who I am.

I don't view movies critically. I still watch them as a viewer, or a fan, and I only look at them critically is if something in the movie jars me back to reality. Same with books, or television, or whatever. I see things as a lover of the art first.

*RomanceWriter*
02-11-2010, 11:48 PM
I notice more things. When I see something beautiful, like a sunset, I find myself trying to describe it in words. I notice people's expressions during different moods, etc.
So, I guess it made me more aware of everything around me.

C.M.C.
02-12-2010, 01:11 AM
I suppose the recognition of any modicum of talent I possess has made me feel more proud of myself, but I'm not sure it's been enough of a change to warrant mention.

Polenth
02-12-2010, 01:27 AM
Have you guys started seeing things in a new perspective after writing?

No. Writing is a way of describing how I see the world, rather than the way I see the world being dictated by writing.

Other
02-12-2010, 01:32 AM
I'm another one who started writing early, so writing has become such a part of me that I don't know what I'd be like without it. However, I think look at things in a more artistic light than most people

RemusShepherd
02-12-2010, 01:49 AM
When I started writing (over 15 years ago), it was for fun. I had some early, easy success. It made me a happier, more social person -- I discovered that I had a talent, a reason for people to like me. I wanted to share it.

When I decided to try writing professionally, I soon discovered that talent didn't cut it. I needed to learn and put in work. It made me question the purpose of my life, and that questioning -- eventually -- led to greater determination and self confidence. But alone.

One day I got a chance to talk with luminaries of literature, and the response they gave me was overwhelming. 'You are good enough', 'You are ready', etc. It made me feel validated, part of society again. Putting in the work to polish my talent felt like a wise move. Their praise gave me more determination.

Now, my determination and work is still not paying off. I am getting old enough that I need to pay attention to my health as much as I do my writing. I am still alone. I feel rejected. Not my work -- you get used to your work being rejected pretty quickly. No, I feel that the world has rejected me, not because my talent is poor or my skills are lacking, but because the perspective and ideas I bring to literature are not desirable to the human race. I don't think like a human being. Yet books are published for and about human beings. I feel more isolated from humanity than ever before in my life.

This will pass, I know. My soul may be tarnished, but it is still made of steel.

Libbie
02-12-2010, 02:06 AM
Ever since I began writing / beta-reading etc. I have found myself living differently.

I no longer watch movies for movies but I see the actors and judge them, I listen to the dialogue and imagine it written down and analyze the characters meticulously.

Movies seem to be just books with video in the back the same way music is poetry with music in the back.

Have you guys started seeing things in a new perspective after writing?

Yes, I've definitely been doing the same! I'm all hung up on the song "Judy In Disguise" right now, but not only because of the poppy beat -- every time I hear the lyrics, I get a writer's buzz. "Cantaloupe eyes...that is brilliant! You made me a life of ashes...exquisite!"

I for sure pay more attention to word choice and dialogue now. :)

scarletpeaches
02-12-2010, 02:07 AM
I'm far more critical of my reading material.

More observant while people-watching than I used to be.

The question I ask myself most is "How can I use this in a book?"

childeroland
02-12-2010, 02:10 AM
I've gotten a (somewhat) thicker skin. Heh.

Jamesaritchie
02-12-2010, 02:12 AM
If writing made me read books differently, or made me watch movies differently, I probably wouldn't write another word.

I hope writing hasn't changed me. Well, it's made me a little fatter, a little softer, and has graciously given me a bad back and carpal tunnel. Does that count?

blacbird
02-12-2010, 02:15 AM
It's made me a lot less sarcastic.

caw

M.Austin
02-12-2010, 02:20 AM
Have you guys started seeing things in a new perspective after writing?

Yes, sometimes good, sometimes bad.

I used to be able to pick up any book that looked interesting and adore it for what it was. Now, I pick books up and pick them to shreds, unless they are very well written. It's really, really annoying. I think the critical eye is worth it though.

scarletpeaches
02-12-2010, 02:20 AM
It's made me a lot less sarcastic.

cawAnd aren't we all glad of that.

McCaw

kurzon
02-12-2010, 08:45 AM
The more I write, the less I read in the genre I write.

I write fantasy novels, and read murder mysteries. [Still read _some_ fantasy novels - can't give up my favourite authors - but I read vastly less than I used to and sometimes feel remarkably out of touch.]

I think it's because I get sucked into someone else's fantasy world, and pay less attention to my own when I read fantasy.

LuckyH
02-12-2010, 11:38 AM
I was sitting in a café yesterday pretending not to listen to a conversation between three men at an adjoining table. They were talking about kissing a woman who had been eating garlic.

Taking out my notebook would have been too obvious, so I pretended doing the crossword and made little notes at the side to remind me

Unfortunately, the conversation deteriorated to gutter level and made me laugh, thus drawing attention to myself and I had to stop writing. Those little notes are now on paper for posterity, something I would not have done before I started writing (seriously).

kaitie
02-12-2010, 12:25 PM
I curse more. :D

shaldna
02-12-2010, 01:05 PM
A long time after I started to write (and a year or so after I finsihed university) I went back and took a degree in Literature with teh Open University (which has a great creative writing option in the degree)
http://www.open.ac.uk

Which made me think alot more about what I was writing, but it also made me pay more attention to what I was reading. A result of which i found myself picking up on things that annoyed me more.

threedogpeople
02-12-2010, 02:30 PM
Writing turns my silent screams of pain and frustration into words.

It also has given voice the the joys in my life when it didn't seem, at least to my conscious mind, that there were any.

Ms Hollands
02-12-2010, 02:48 PM
Apparently I'm also a bitch to watch films with as I try and piece together backstories for all the characters and pick apart the handling of scenes and 'Huh, that character wouldn't do that!' and 'That's stupid - that plot hole right there'. Mu husband makes up for it by watching for 5 minutes and working out the twist at the end of the film.


I've been accused of this too, but I don't think it's from writing as much as from studying English Lit at uni. I don't think writing has changed me at all.

Kitty27
02-12-2010, 05:36 PM
It makes me sane. I am able to function in society as a sane person. Of course,I am bug guts insane. But writing organizes all my mad thoughts and ideas.

It makes me happy. I can sit down and go into my fictional worlds and be happy as all outdoors. Writing is my joy,passion,and after my children,my deepest pleasure in life.

It almost gives me a physical high.

Like others,I listen to conversations and movies,breaking down scenes and dialogue. My brother often tells me to STFU!

Midnight Star
02-14-2010, 07:44 AM
Writing has made my life better. For once, I know that I have potential to do something great that people will like. Writing is how I vent, and how I unwind. If something bad happens to me, I write about it either in my diary, a short story, or sometimes I go so far as to out it in one of my novels. The villain in my current WIP was actually based off of someone I despised, so I wanted revenge and created a character that resembled her.

aadams73
02-15-2010, 12:49 AM
I spend more time sitting.

stormie
02-15-2010, 01:12 AM
I read with a critical eye, unless I get totally absorbed in the story, which means that writer did a great job of reeling me in.

I dog-ear many pages in a book so that later I can go back and reread a certain phrase or description or dialogue that caught my attention.

Wayne K
02-15-2010, 01:14 AM
Writing has made me a better writer.

Sneaky Devil
02-15-2010, 01:25 AM
I find myself being even more critical of my own writing, which is not a bad thing, but also I watch more movies/tv in the genre I write than I did before. I'm really not one for tv anymore, used to be addicted to it, but now when I do watch something it's generally Sci-Fi/Fantasy. Plus I've broadened my reading horizons as well. :)

Ugawa
02-15-2010, 02:54 AM
I have less of a social life

Jake.C
02-15-2010, 07:01 AM
I now can't look at a poster, or read a leaflet without checking for misplaced apostrophes.

Thanks writing!

timewaster
02-15-2010, 03:27 PM
Ever since I began writing / beta-reading etc. I have found myself living differently.


Have you guys started seeing things in a new perspective after writing?

I think I am probably less critical as the world looks different when you are a manufacturer rather than a consumer - I tend to spot poor workmanship but am less intellectually critical.
I also make less effort to conform and be obviously organised. People are more forgiving of creative people and are actually a little disappointed if you don't fit the 'eccentric' stereotype. I am no more eccentric than when I was a corporate exec but I make less effort to appear sensible.

Ruv Draba
02-15-2010, 06:50 PM
I've always loved improvised drama and reading fiction, but took up writing fiction to balance my head out a bit. I've always tended toward more analytic work. For me, people have always been behaviour and motive. I knew what they were feeling, but their emotions were irrelevant to me.

The craft-learning is changing how I look at fiction -- which I'd expect: cooking changes how you look at food too. But since I've been plotting characters' emotional journeys, people also say that I'm more agreeable, more sympathetic toward them.

I don't know if that's really true, but I am starting to tear up when I hammer their lids down.

stormie
02-15-2010, 06:58 PM
I now can't look at a poster, or read a leaflet without checking for misplaced apostrophes.

Thanks writing!
Exactly!

Chris P
02-15-2010, 07:11 PM
I'm with the OP on movies now. Dealing with criticism and rejection has given me a bit more skin. I no longer have illusions that I'm going to please everyone; I am going to fit where I belong in the pile of writers and stories. And that's okay.

Facing the "it just won't work out" rejection letters as well as the "I clapped my hands with laughter" acceptance letters for the same story makes me appreciate how fickle readers and the business can be, and that's okay too. I think overall I'm much more realistic about the world.

Yasaibatake
02-15-2010, 09:02 PM
I've been writing since I was little, so like some others on here, that part of it hasn't changed me. I do use freewriting as a way to work through problems, which is fairly new for me but very effective.

Really, it was trying to publish my writing that changed me in several ways. I have a much thicker skin, along with the ability to separate myself from my work. I notice more about things going on around me (though one of my profs likes to argue that I always noticed them, I've simply learned how to realize that I noticed them). It's also taught me not to worry so much about finding any single "right" way, but just to have fun with it.

Those are all lessons which I'm also learning to apply to my teaching, so you could also say that writing makes me a better teacher. My students thank you all :)