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annetookeen
02-09-2010, 03:27 AM
Does anyone have info on Omnific Publishing? They seem pretty new and I couldn't find a thread on them. Here's the link http://www.omnificpublishing.com/

Thanks!

michael_b
02-09-2010, 05:44 AM
I took a look a their site and I'm wondering what a 'Certified Editor' might be exactly. The reason I'm curious is that their editing staff are all designated with 'Certified Editor' in their bios.

Also everything seems pitched to authors, I don't see much info for readers on the site.

MickRooney
02-09-2010, 06:09 AM
I suspect Omnific is more an author collective, rather than a publisher.

michael_b
02-09-2010, 07:47 AM
They're saying they are a publisher. They even have an open submissions.

Maddie
02-09-2010, 08:25 AM
It appears to possibly be an eBook outlet.

Sarashay
02-09-2010, 08:32 AM
It was apparently started by a group of fanfic writers, with the intention to publish their "transformative works" (their term) with the names changed to avoid lawsuits. (A practice often known as "filing off the serial numbers.")

http://www.journalfen.net/community/clairvoyantwank/468741.html

While these people have a great deal of enthusiasm about writing, they don't seem to have a lick of experience in publishing. We'll see if they manage to pull it off, but it looks like a trainwreck about to happen from where I'm standing.

emilycross
02-09-2010, 01:09 PM
:popcorn:

kaitie
02-09-2010, 02:17 PM
It was apparently started by a group of fanfic writers, with the intention to publish their "transformative works" (their term) with the names changed to avoid lawsuits. (A practice often known as "filing off the serial numbers.")

http://www.journalfen.net/community/clairvoyantwank/468741.html

While these people have a great deal of enthusiasm about writing, they don't seem to have a lick of experience in publishing. We'll see if they manage to pull it off, but it looks like a trainwreck about to happen from where I'm standing.

Am I the only person who hears this and thinks if I had a work that a lot of people wrote fanfic about, I'd be scanning the hell out of anything they did publish? I guess it just seems kinda like cheating to me. There is such a thing as "legit" fanfic. There used to be X-files books published, there are Star Trek and Star Wars and Doctor Who books out there. I have nothing wrong with writing fanfic, but I do have a problem with someone trying to cheat a system meant to protect ideas to make a profit without any benefit to those the original idea belonged to. And I guess I'm thinking if your that good and your ideas are that good, just write something original.

In any case, it still sounds like a lawsuit waiting to happen. Changing names alone isn't going to make something less copyright infringement is it? I mean, if you've got a fanfic about a bunch of kids in wizard school playing a game on brooms, etc. it doesn't matter if you change the name of Hogwarts to something else, does it? Not to mention this is a counter-intuitive practice to begin with. People read fanfic because they want to read about characters they love. They are either going to change everything that makes it recognizable and then publish it (in which case, again why not write something original), or they're going to try to do just enough to get by legally and hopefully still appeal to the fanfic readers. I don't know, the whole thing just sounds ridiculous, not to mention dangerous.

Momento Mori
02-09-2010, 02:56 PM
Omnific Website FAQs:
Q: Will I have to pay to publish my book?

A: Absolutely not. Omnific is not a vanity publisher. We pay the author a percentage of the sales and we require no money from authors at any stage of the publishing process.

By "percentage of the sales", I'm assuming they mean royalties, but there's no further information on how much this is or what it's calculated on.


Omnific Website FAQs:
Q: Will Omnific market my book?

A: Yes. Omnific has a Marketing Director and a staff of Marketing Specialists that will help you market your book nationally through a variety of traditional and innovative techniques.

No information on what these "traditional and innovative techniques" will be and nothing to suggest that anyone involved with this company has the publishing or marketing experience to deliver them.

I suspect it has something to do with their Facebook and Twitter page, but neither of these is traditional or innovative or indeed proven to be effective.

No word on whether books will be sold via Amazon or other ebook retailers.

Given that they've got 6 ebooks coming out on or around Valentine's Day (http://omnificpublishing.com/index.php?main_page=products_new), you'd think that the least the sales page would do is put in a summary of what each book is about. The fact that this is missing so close to publication is not reassuring.

MM

annetookeen
02-09-2010, 06:26 PM
...
Given that they've got 6 ebooks coming out on or around Valentine's Day (http://omnificpublishing.com/index.php?main_page=products_new), you'd think that the least the sales page would do is put in a summary of what each book is about. The fact that this is missing so close to publication is not reassuring.
MM

Right, this is odd. Although I find the covers quite attractive, the lack of info--not even a blurb--for the books doesn't look like good marketing practice at all.

Richard White
02-09-2010, 07:19 PM
As a Media Tie-in Writer, I do tend to object to the term "legit" fanfic to my work. (The difference between my work and a screen writer's is the medium in which it is shown: aka book vs TV/Film.)

However, I do agree that just "filing the serial numbers off is a "bad idea". Authors and producers seldom check for things like this. However lawyers do.

Ask the author of "Another Hope", or "The Death Wave". Remember what happened to the author of "Russett Noon"?

It's not pretty.

JulieB
02-09-2010, 07:41 PM
What Richard White said.

Tie-in books are authorized by the studio (or whatever entity holds the copyright) and the author gets a paycheck. It's pro work.

emilycross
02-09-2010, 08:31 PM
wow i actually recognise Boycott and Barflies, its a HUGE twilight fanfic BUT the only semblance to the actually characters are the names. The author is actually really talented writer and that story is completely AU to twilight (like i said the only resemblance is the names). Can't understand why she wouldn't rework it as nonfanfic when it is so unlike the original story (as in completely not related at all)

EDIT


"The stories published under this account are the sole property of vjgm. They may not be copied, published or posted elsewhere without my express written consent which I do not give at this time."

This is the author i'm talking about, mentioned on Famdom Wank - to be honest (i can only speak for the version i read a while ago) there was no semblance to TW at all! If the author changes the characters names, you would never connect the two at all. I just wonder why the author would advertise it like this and not just take down the fanfics and rework them as originals?

ChristineR
02-09-2010, 08:56 PM
I think that's the plan, emilycross. They approached authors of successful fanfics that they thought could be re-worked, and asked them to remove the copyrighted elements and now they're going to publish them as original fiction.

emilycross
02-09-2010, 09:03 PM
So does this mean that these books are legitimate then? Because they don't hold any of the copyright/recognisable elements?

Richard White
02-09-2010, 09:10 PM
That would depend on how much they're reworked and if they do remove the recognizable features.

IANAL, though.

Momento Mori
02-09-2010, 09:13 PM
If there's nothing in those books that calls to mind the original works they fanficced, then IMO, it's difficult to see how a case for copyright infringement could succeed.

What interests me is whether they're going to be advertising those works within the fandoms that they originally derived from. If they are, and that comes to the attention of the original rights holders, then the original rights holders might think that it's worth sending out a C&D letter.

That's all speculation though.

I remember a situation back in 2002/2003 when a big HP author self-published an original fantasy work and tried selling it back to the then HP fandom. It died on its arse.

It's possible for a venture like this to succeed commercially, but the writers have to be either very good or have a slavishly devoted fanbase willing to pay for it. When I was in fandom, there were v. few writers able to command that because there's a difference between getting something for free that's based on something you already love and paying a few quid for something that doesn't have those recognisable elements.

MM

veinglory
02-09-2010, 09:17 PM
However, I do agree that just "filing the serial numbers off is a "bad idea". Authors and producers seldom check for things like this. However lawyers do.

There are dozens of mainstream and small press published books known to have originated as fan fic. The fact that most people don't know which ones tend to suggest that the "filing" was successful in those cases.

emilycross
02-09-2010, 09:22 PM
Well, reading Boycott and Barflies author's bio specifically it seems that her fanfic version was published in physical and ebook before (without her permission) for about 8 months before she decided to rework and publish it with omni. She's a really well known FF writer in the TW fandom (or she was) so i'd imagine she'd be using it as a platform.

Richard White
02-09-2010, 09:41 PM
There are dozens of mainstream and small press published books known to have originated as fan fic. The fact that most people don't know which ones tend to suggest that the "filing" was successful in those cases.

And that's why I said "just" ;)

Taking something you've written and making it clearly your own is more than just "filing". That's melting it down and carving a whole new tool for yourself. In some ways, it's actually harder to do than starting out with something completely new.

I have a novel that was completed (and paid for) but never published. I've toyed with re-writing it but it just seems like so much work when I have other stuff I could be writing.

Maybe one day though . . .

veinglory
02-09-2010, 11:42 PM
It is referred to as "filing" as a short hand by the people that do it, or seek out the resulting published material (yep, including me. I have a small collection of novels know to have started life as fanfic).

Richard White
02-09-2010, 11:51 PM
Ah, I see we're using different definitions for the same word.

When I think of filing away the serial numbers, I'm thinking about doing the bare amount of changes necessary to hide the original story. I didn't realize it had a specific meaning in the fanfic community.

Adds new definition into the 'file'. *grin*

Cyia
02-10-2010, 12:09 AM
http://www.whois.net/whois/omnificpublishing.com

According to "whois"

It's registered to someone who put "Publishing" down as their name, from Tyler, Tx. (A smallish city.)

The Admin lists her name as Elizabeth Harper from "WhiteHouse, Tx"... WhiteHouse is a tiny tiny town (around 7K people)- no way there's any kind of publishing industry there in the usual, commercial sense.

It also lists psymommy as the person behind it, which is the person from the Twilight site.

Oh look... there's video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56k9OF4HTTU&feature=related

CheekyWench
02-22-2010, 09:08 AM
Someone just RT'd a link saying they were open for submissions. Of course I came here fist ;) and found this thread... Well, I'm looking at their books online and the covers are nice - and I have yet to really pinpoint any story being ripped off of anything else. Looks nice from here.


(and... no ... I have nothing to do with them, was just curious about the tweet since I haven't heard of them)

FionnaFlynn
03-26-2010, 08:35 PM
I checked Omnific out as well, as one of my fave fanfics ended up here. "The Unidentified Redhead" was originally written as "I Love LA" and it was a real life fanfic with Robert Pattinson as the male character. It was a good story, and the dialogue between the characters was interesting. Lots of steamy sex, though, almost porn-like.

Would love to know how much the authors get of the $14.99 price...

defyalllogic
03-26-2010, 09:11 PM
they say specifically that they don't publish fanfic...


Q: I have a fanfiction story about Ross and Rachel in Friends. Can I publish it through Omnific?

A: No. We do not publish fanfiction. What you can do is take anything that is your original idea (plot, characterization, etc.) and develop it into a manuscript using original characters that are your own creation.

and they are currently accepting submissions:

Omnific Publishing is now open to submissions in the genres of romance, fantasy, science fiction, urban fantasy, paranormal, chick lit, and erotica.

they have quite a few guidelines for submitting though, including a 2+ page synopsis (hate those)

emilycross
03-26-2010, 09:14 PM
Yes but many of the works that they've published began as fanfiction.

Granted the majority of these pieces were very AU (if Barflies is anything to go by), so they essentially now nonfanfiction but they started out as fanfiction. And sought out popular fanfic writers who had stories that could become non fanfics.

defyalllogic
03-26-2010, 09:21 PM
what is AU?

Richard White
03-26-2010, 09:31 PM
Alternate Universe

emilycross
03-26-2010, 10:50 PM
Alternative Universe, basically for example, in the case of twilight - if all the characters were human and there was no such thing as vampires, but Edward and Bella etc. are still there. In the case of Barflies, IMO the names of the characters were the only thing related to twilight universe, everything else was different so could easily be made original

nkkingston
11-30-2010, 01:04 PM
Apparently rumours are circulating that certain rights holders are taking a close interest in this (http://community.livejournal.com/fail_fandomanon/5404.html?thread=23780892#t23780892). I wouldn't put much stock in it, but having


Q: I have a fanfiction story about Ross and Rachel in Friends. Can I publish it through Omnific?

A: No. We do not publish fanfiction. What you can do is take anything that is your original idea (plot, characterization, etc.) and develop it into a manuscript using original characters that are your own creation.


in their FAQ (http://omnificpublishing.com/index.php?main_page=page&id=6)is a lawsuit waiting to happen. It's more than possible to rework fanfic into something original (especially if it was an AU to start with) but some authors are going to take this as the bare minimum of filing needed. Changing the names isn't enough to prevent a plagiarism suit.

Terie
11-30-2010, 01:36 PM
Apparently rumours are circulating that certain rights holders are taking a close interest in this (http://community.livejournal.com/fail_fandomanon/5404.html?thread=23780892#t23780892). I wouldn't put much stock in it, but having



in their FAQ (http://omnificpublishing.com/index.php?main_page=page&id=6)is a lawsuit waiting to happen. It's more than possible to rework fanfic into something original (especially if it was an AU to start with) but some authors are going to take this as the bare minimum of filing needed. Changing the names isn't enough to prevent a plagiarism suit.

I think you might be misreading the FAQ. What they say is, as far as I can tell, absolutely correct: you must take your own original ideas and write them. That word original means exactly that...your own ideas, not someone else's.

nkkingston
11-30-2010, 03:05 PM
They are saying that, but they're also saying it's okay if those original ideas started out as fanfic. And knowing some elements of fandom, original can stretch to anything from "Barry, Don and Persephone are space pilots engaged in a battle for galactic freedom" to "Barry, Don and Persephone are school aged wizards engaged in a battle against dark magic, and Don and Barry hook up". If it's a fandom the editors aren't well acquainted with it would be easy to miss quite how similar a filed fic is to its original fandom (especially if the writer does mention it's ex-fanfic) until it's too late. Making 'Don' gay is original characterisation compared to the source material, but if he's still got umpteen brothers and a sister who've all been to the same school as him and somtimes he resents his famous best friend, then it's not going to pass muster. But there are people out there who will insist it does. Or to put it another way, they follow the instructions here (http://www.eroticauthorsassociation.com/articles/off-sg.htm) but stop somewhere around Part 2 or 3 (that essay doesn't sit very well with me, partly because it's supposedly advice from a professional organisation)

It's the kind of thing that wouldn't be a problem if there weren't already half a (http://www.journalfen.net/community/fandom_wank/1144894.html) dozen (http://fanlore.org/wiki/Filing_Off_The_Serial_Numbers) examples of people trying to do exactly this. Having that in their FAQ is just inviting trouble, and if the SMeyer rumours did turn out to be true it could count against them. There's a reason other publishers specifically insist people don't submit filed fanfic. It's not technically illegal, but what a lot of fandom is concerned about is if it does go to court, it'll set a precedence and the grey area may get a lot less grey.

Terie
11-30-2010, 03:18 PM
They are saying that, but they're also saying it's okay if those original ideas started out as fanfic.

I disagree. There's nothing in the quote that says you can start out with someone else's IP.


We do not publish fanfiction. What you can do is take anything that is your original idea (plot, characterization, etc.) and develop it into a manuscript using original characters that are your own creation.

It says you can take your original idea and write it using original characters.

I could be wrong, and maybe someone like Medievalist could step in here, but in the context of copyright, I'm fairly certain that original has the explicit meaning of 'your own' and not 'someone else's'.

I have no doubt that some fan-fic writers will (and do) try to stretch the meanings of words to accommodate themselves, but at the most basic level, copyright law is fairly clear as to what constitutes 'original' work and what does not. Fan-fic is not 'original' by definition. (Yes, many elements of it will be original to the writer, but not all, and therefore, it is not completely 'original'.)

miamyselfandi
11-30-2010, 04:14 PM
I have no doubt that some fan-fic writers will (and do) try to stretch the meanings of words to accommodate themselves, but at the most basic level, copyright law is fairly clear as to what constitutes 'original' work and what does not. Fan-fic is not 'original' by definition. (Yes, many elements of it will be original to the writer, but not all, and therefore, it is not completely 'original'.)

There are some fascinating links to follow in this discussion. Check this from above your comment:




It's the kind of thing that wouldn't be a problem if there weren't already half a (http://www.journalfen.net/community/fandom_wank/1144894.html) dozen (http://fanlore.org/wiki/Filing_Off_The_Serial_Numbers) examples of people trying to do exactly this.

Following the link above, dozen (http://fanlore.org/wiki/Filing_Off_The_Serial_Numbers), I found this:

However, in this context, pseudonymity can also have its disadvantages. When J.J. Massa published her novel The Edge (http://www.amazon.com/Edge-J-J-Massa/dp/1602020582), it took a while (and only after it was published in print; the ebook version sold without problems) before a reader recognized it as the Chakotay/Paris (http://fanlore.org/wiki/Chakotay/Paris) AU Another Time, Another Place (http://fanlore.org/wiki/Another_Time%2C_Another_Place_%28Star_Trek:_Voyage r_story%29) from Star Trek Voyager (http://fanlore.org/wiki/Star_Trek_Voyager) fandom. Said reader also knew who the original fanfic author was, and it was not J. J. Massa. When the author learned this, she began leaving comments on several reviews for The Edge claiming that it was actually her own story being republished without permission. Though she was initially met with skepticism, as she was a fanfic writer accusing a published romance author of plagiarism (http://fanlore.org/wiki/Plagiarism), the evidence was in her favor and the publisher withdrew the title.

Which implies that the fanfic author's ownership was recognized.

veinglory
11-30-2010, 07:03 PM
Essentially she stole something that was already stolen and the work was withdrawn. That says nothing whatsoever about the legal standing of the intermediate work.

BenPanced
11-30-2010, 07:20 PM
To me, that sounds more like CYA insurance on the part of the publisher.

nkkingston
11-30-2010, 08:00 PM
Yeah, the Massa thing is an example of plagiarism a transformative work, which is copyright tied in knots. However, it also demonstrates the fact that filing the serial numbers off doesn't always work - people who've read the original will recognise the rewrite.

Obviously Omnific are okay with it, but I do wonder about other publishers in terms of First Rights. If your manuscript is still recognisable by those who read the original fanfic, does that mean you've used your first rights?


ETA - to put things another way, what they're doing is perfectly legal as long as everyone is playing the game honestly and writes well enough to cover their tracks. However, with that on their FAQ (and having launched in a Twilight forum with the specific intention of publishing filed fanfic) I can see rights holders keeping a very close watch on them. All it takes is one person to half-arse the filing in a fandom editors aren't acquainted with well enough to tell the difference and they could be in real trouble.

veinglory
11-30-2010, 08:37 PM
Fanworks with the fan aspect removed have been published on quite a few occassion. But the fan aspect does have to be removed.

miamyselfandi
11-30-2010, 08:54 PM
The Massa book was interesting because the publisher did see it enough of a problem to pull the book, which is what I meant by the fanfic author's ownership being recognized. It wasn't a literal legal recognition but the publisher did pull it.

The reaction to the rewrite of Jane Eyre as a gay romance surprised me. I'm not sure how that could be omg-plagiarism if P&P&Zombies wasn't viewed that way.

nkkingston
11-30-2010, 08:58 PM
I think it's because she was claiming Charlotte Bronte's words as her own - the original disclaimer strongly implied every but the most iconic lines were her own. Instead, whole passages were indentical apart from 'she' being search&replaced with 'he'.

BenPanced
11-30-2010, 09:40 PM
The reaction to the rewrite of Jane Eyre as a gay romance surprised me. I'm not sure how that could be omg-plagiarism if P&P&Zombies wasn't viewed that way.
Pride & Prejudice & Zombies is a parody, which is a whole 'nother ball of copyright wax.

miamyselfandi
11-30-2010, 10:45 PM
I thought about the parody after I'd already posted. Didn't realize she was claiming it as her own, though. (I'm finding the side-issues in this thread a lot more interesting than the publishing company itself.)

MelissaYoas
12-04-2010, 10:27 AM
I've been a reader of derivative fiction of Twilight for about two years, and other "fandoms" (as they're called) for many more, and I have to tell you that the Twilight and Harry Potter fandoms have writers whose works are far superior in quality and originality to a great number of published 'original' fiction. That some of these writers have not only potential but highly probability of being successful authors is not a question to me, it's a certainty. More over, with some Twilight derivative works, as a few posters have said, the story lines are so far removed from the original characters created by Stephanie Meyer that the only link to the original books are names and/or settings. And one thing I would also note: there was a question about whether or not these writers would be able to carry an audience of enough mass to publish original works. Some of the bigger stories and authors in this area have upwards of 50,000 readers worldwide. This is from a tiny little niche that represents a minuscule fraction of readers. In my opinion, not too shabby. Charity auctions where the authors offer to personally craft a derivate story per the request of the bidder can bring in 5-6K per big name author.

In regards to the publisher, I believe the intent is to try to transition some of the better authors whose works are derivative by the loosest of associations, and give them a more mainstream, expanded audience while maintaining a link to the sizable fan base they built up writing derivative works. I know several of their publications, however, are works that are 100% original, so they haven't pigeon-holed themselves. It actually sounds like a great idea: "new" authors who come pre-packaged with a existing fan base.

Katrina S. Forest
12-04-2010, 07:01 PM
Welcome to AW, Melissa.

The idea of an author having an existing audience at the time he/she publishes his/her first book is not new. It's called platform.

If a fanfic author does have a huge online following and can write quality original fiction that said following is willing to buy, then by all means, they should write and market their original work. But it's not the publisher's job to "transition" them.

For the record, I have no issues with original works that got started as ideas for fanfics. The finished product is only one of three things:
1) An obvious ripoff of an existing work.
2) Not a ripoff, but not a well-written manuscript either, because the replacement world/characters are not developed enough.
3) A high-quality original novel that stands on its own.

If it's #3, (and assuming first rights weren't used up), why should the author submit to Omnific, as opposed to submitting to the big name publishers first, just like any other aspiring novelist?

BenPanced
12-04-2010, 09:00 PM
Good point. You want to reach as large an audience as possible.

kaitie
12-04-2010, 09:21 PM
In regards to the publisher, I believe the intent is to try to transition some of the better authors whose works are derivative by the loosest of associations, and give them a more mainstream, expanded audience while maintaining a link to the sizable fan base they built up writing derivative works. I know several of their publications, however, are works that are 100% original, so they haven't pigeon-holed themselves. It actually sounds like a great idea: "new" authors who come pre-packaged with a existing fan base. Couldn't said author just tell his/her fanbase the same thing, though? I have friends who follow a few online authors, and when one got a publishing deal with a small publisher, she announced it and many people (like my friend) signed up for her book immediately. It seems to me that the author was the one doing the promotion, not the publisher.

I'm just thinking that it doesn't matter who the publishing deal is with--hell it could be self-published--because if the author has a following of 50,000 people, they're going to be able to sell a good number of books regardless just by saying "I'm published now. Buy my book."

ETA: Also, couldn't advertising themselves as someone taking works derived from fanfic potentially be a negative? There's definitely a stigma out there regarding fanfic, and I'm just wondering if this could lead to them not being taken as seriously. I don't know, honestly. I'm just asking. Do you think it could be detrimental or cause problems?

emilycross
12-04-2010, 09:45 PM
ETA: Also, couldn't advertising themselves as someone taking works derived from fanfic potentially be a negative? There's definitely a stigma out there regarding fanfic, and I'm just wondering if this could lead to them not being taken as seriously. I don't know, honestly. I'm just asking. Do you think it could be detrimental or cause problems?

Argh - had big long post and lost it!!

Anyhoo, I definitely agree with your statement here. I've read some of the works (when ff) and enjoyed them. I would often think that the only connection with fanfiction would be the characters names. Place, personality, plot are all completely different. Most are unrecognisable as ff except for the names.

This is why like other posters, I think it's strange they would emphasis the fanfiction element. (i think but i'm not definite about this as i'm 90% sure when this was founded that they mentioned they were a group of FF writers. Don't see it on current website) I understand that this publisher was founded so that the founding authors could publish their work, so maybe they were being upfront about it (especially as one is quite big in the TW FF), but the title of the work could have easily been renamed along with the other changes and no one would have been the wiser (as I'm sure its been edited to be book length) without emphasising the link with the publisher.

I wish the authors all the best, as I've read some of their stuff which was excellent. I'm just not entirely sure this angle was wise, perhaps renaming, reworking the piece and submitting it to normal publishers might have been wiser.

EDIT: In fairness though, I know one author used omnific to publish her story after it was published by someone else (who changed the names of the characters) etc.

JSSchley
12-06-2010, 09:20 PM
I saw that this thread had gotten bumped. I've been keeping an eye on these guys for a year--in fact, it was this thread that led me to AW, for which I've been grateful (even though I've been a stranger here ever since I got a second job!).

I ran some numbers on these guys this morning, since their full 2010 list has now been announced as of last night.

It seems that of 19 titles, 11 were previously published as fan fiction, 10 in the Twilight fandom and 1 in Prison Break fandom. Eight are original titles, including one which is a sequel to a piece previously published as fan fiction. The reason the fan fic link has to be maintained, as near as I can tell, is that it is still their primary source of audience as well as authors--the "acquisitions editors" send letters to authors of popular fan fictions asking if they would like to publish. (Edit to add for clarification: Whether this is still their primary method for acquisitions, I don't know. I simply know that it has happened. For all I know, they're now deluged with query letters and are turning people away left and right and don't use this method any longer.)

All signs point to the filings being legal; as emilycross said, the fan fiction was very far from the Twilight universe to begin with. If the publisher has the money to fight Hatchette and Meyer should they come after them, they would probably win (although I suspect that Meyer would win just by brute force). However, very little has been changed from the fan fiction versions besides names and occasionally a switch from first to third person--line-by-line comparisons of sample chapters to the fan fictions they came from are disappointing, to say the least. Whether or not Meyer would have a case for infringement on those grounds is an interesting question to ask.

The more disturbing thing, IMO, is that while they own up to being part of fan fiction, they do not own up to how many of their authors are on their staff. Since nearly all the books are published using pennames, it can be difficult to trace back to the staff list if you don't know the fan fiction works the books came from. However, 5 of the 14 staff members have published books this year, two of those five have published two books, and most of those 5 were included in the Valentine's Anthology book, all in all accounting for 42% of their frontlist. I had not heard the term "author collective" before I read this thread, but that's more or less what this is.

As near as I can tell, sales look about normal for a micropress like this one, although they haven't released their in-house sales, which are likely higher due to the platform issue. I suspect that an author without the Twilight fan fiction connections might have difficulty selling his or her book through them, however, this hasn't been proven, as every author who has published this year has connections to the Twilight fan fiction community.

miamyselfandi
12-06-2010, 09:29 PM
The more disturbing thing, IMO, is that while they own up to being part of fan fiction, they do not own up to how many of their authors are on their staff. Since nearly all the books are published using pennames, it can be difficult to trace back to the staff list if you don't know the fan fiction works the books came from. However, 5 of the 14 staff members have published books this year, two of those five have published two books, and most of those 5 were included in the Valentine's Anthology book, all in all accounting for 42% of their frontlist. I had not heard the term "author collective" before I read this thread, but that's more or less what this is.

As near as I can tell, sales look about normal for a micropress like this one, although they haven't released their in-house sales, which are likely higher due to the platform issue. I suspect that an author without the Twilight fan fiction connections might have difficulty selling his or her book through them, however, this hasn't been proven, as every author who has published this year has connections to the Twilight fan fiction community.

None of that is exactly "disturbing" since author collectives do exist. But, why are they hiding their identities by using pseudonyms? Strange.

JSSchley
12-06-2010, 09:36 PM
None of that is exactly "disturbing" since author collectives do exist. But, why are they hiding their identities by using pseudonyms? Strange.

Sorry, I wasn't clear. I'm not disturbed by them being an author collective. Pooling resources to publish one another is a fine idea. I'm concerned that they are trying hard not to appear as one. This to me is a misrepresentation that has real consequences for someone who is thinking about publishing with them--it's reasonable to want to know if the house in question is mostly publishing books by their staff.

miamyselfandi
12-06-2010, 10:26 PM
Sorry, I wasn't clear. I'm not disturbed by them being an author collective. Pooling resources to publish one another is a fine idea. I'm concerned that they are trying hard not to appear as one. This to me is a misrepresentation that has real consequences for someone who is thinking about publishing with them--it's reasonable to want to know if the house in question is mostly publishing books by their staff.

Agreed. Which takes us back to why they are doing this? It appears an attempt to hide something.

JSSchley
12-06-2010, 11:10 PM
To give them the benefit of the doubt (which I try to, as I have gotten to know some of their authors and they are lovely ladies whose books I'd like to see succeed), the pen names may be because much of what they've published is erotica, and it is common to use a pen name in that genre. At the same time, it would be just as easy to say on the staff bio page, "So-and-so is also the author of TITLE, writing as pen name."

fourlittlebees
12-08-2010, 06:05 PM
95% of their titles are reworked all-human Twilight fan fiction. I'm not even sure author collective is a good descriptor, since what it mainly appears to be is a group of fanfic authors told their fics were "good enough to publish" who are then doing little more than filing and self-pubbing, only the "publisher" and the "certified editors" get to skim off whatever pittance they'd be making on CreateSpace.

I think what pp said about erotica is dead on the money; I've noticed that one of their authors is shopping another book. I wonder what agents think when they see a prior credit published through here.

A friend actually bought one of the books, and it's rife with typos, grammar issues, etc. The "editing" is really filing and "certified" doesn't mean anything other than sounding fancy; I'm fairly certain not one person on "staff" has any publishing experience other than fan fiction.

I'd take my novel, assign Twilight character names, and put it online as fan fiction before I'd send it to Omnific.

Alitriona
01-05-2011, 08:45 AM
In reply to the above response, I have been published recently with Omnific Publishing and I can honestly say I have had a very positive experience. Some of the titles released by Omnific Publishing and on their website started out life as fanfiction, there are plenty that didn't and more to come. Omnific is not a collective of fanfic authors getting together and it's not a way to self-publish. My full respect goes out to those who have the know how and funding to self-publish but I am the first to admit I don't and never considered going that route.

My YA novel was never a fanfiction, I had no connection with anyone in Omnific Publishing either in real life or through fanfiction before I submitted with a query in the normal way. I then submitted 3 chapters and received a full request. I found them to be prompt and professional right from the start. I was delighted to be offered a contract and was advised to get my own solicitor to go over it before signing. I actually had two solicitors (one literary) look at it and was advised it was a typical e-book and POD contract. There was no hidden clauses and I certainly haven't signed away every book I'll ever write as I've heard suggested somewhere else on the web. I won't go into details. I don't speak legal and that's why I had my solicitors look at it.

After all that I entered the editing stage. My editors let me away with nothing, there was intensive edits done with 3 editors in stages. I feel I was guided and pushed at the same time but the end result was far beyond my expectations, so in my opinion worth my 6 months of work in editing. From speaking with other Omnific authors it seems to me the editing process is rigorous for everyone and goes far beyond filing off numbers for the manuscripts that did start life as All Human Twilight Fanfiction. I was kept in the loop every step of the way.

I was asked for input on the final cover too, which I was delighted and surprised about. It was down to 3 by the time I was asked which I thought represented the story best. I was aware the ultimate decision wasn't mine and was delighted when my favorite was picked.

An announcement was made and review requests sent out, a blog tour was set up on my behalf, that is happening in February. If my book doesn't sell, they don't make their money back. It's as simple as that. Omnific's marketing team guides authors through setting up social network connections, although I had this done already. I receive regular emails regarding promoting my book on the internet and other avenues. Omnific send out review copies on request. I have never been asked to pay any money up front at any point of the process. They have never tried to sell my books back to me. I did purchase some extra copies for family and friends at a reduced rate on top of the ones I already received free as part of my contract. I had to approach them about the purchase a few weeks ago and as usual they were pleasant and helpful getting the books to me before Christmas.

So far it is early days but I have received some great reviews and I'm very pleased with the response as well as the almost daily contact I still have with members of the Omnific Publishing team. Of course all the authors are out there pushing their books, we are with a small publisher who has limited resources and we were all aware of that upon signing up. We want our individual books to be successful and I know personally I want Omnific to grow because I would love to work with them again. I don't doubt for a second that Omnific is here to stay and will expand slowly and steadily into this year and beyond.

The other books I've read from Omnific have been highly enjoyable, look beautiful and are edited and presented as well as any shop bought books I've purchased this year.

At the moment my book is on Amazon.com in paperback and Kindle, Amazon.co.uk in Kindle, B&N nook, on Omnific's own site as paperback, e-book(PDF) and e-pack (PDF, EPUB and MOBI). Again, plans to expand on this in the future.

So that is my personal experience with Omnific Publishing. Obviously different publishers suit different people and they won't suit everyone here. I hope some find my insight a little helpful. It's 4.40am here so I also hope I make sense.

JulianaHaygert
07-30-2012, 06:18 PM
Bump ...

It's been a long time since anyone updated this thread. Anyone have something to share about them?

kellion92
07-31-2012, 09:05 PM
Saw this today:
http://www.prlog.org/11938328-berkley-purchases-sylvain-reynards-gabriels-inferno-series-from-omnific-publishing.html

Berkley pays seven figures to Omnific for rights to Gabriel's Inferno series, which I believe had Twilight fan fiction origins. I have no firsthand experience with them, though.

Silver-Midnight
07-31-2012, 11:00 PM
Saw this today:
http://www.prlog.org/11938328-berkley-purchases-sylvain-reynards-gabriels-inferno-series-from-omnific-publishing.html

Berkley pays seven figures to Omnific for rights to Gabriel's Inferno series, which I believe had Twilight fan fiction origins. I have no firsthand experience with them, though.

Wow. Good for them and good for the author. :D

emilycross
08-01-2012, 12:42 PM
It's not surprising in the light of 50 shades success . . .

Well done to the author!

gingerwoman
05-30-2013, 11:49 AM
I have no experience with them but I notice yet another of their books is a best seller on Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Tangled-The-Series-ebook/dp/B00CW665VI/ref=zg_bs_17_8

Undercover
07-11-2013, 05:02 PM
Sounds like some of their books were really successful. Has anyone else heard anything more on them?

Undercover
07-12-2013, 01:31 AM
Okay so I did some searching and found out that a big publisher took on another couple of their books.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/simon--schuster-purchases-wallbanger-and-the-redhead-series-by-alice-clayton-from-omnific-publishing-at-auction-in-a-major-deal-191215161.html

Call me stupid, but how does this happen exactly? After Omnific acquires the book and if the book does amazinly good a big pub will pick it up? Or does the author look for the agent afterwards and the agent does the work? I see that Ms. Knight has made all these deals. However it happens, I find it really interesting.

AuburnAssassin
11-27-2013, 10:15 PM
They also sold Emma Chase's Tangled in a large deal. That book then dropped off their site as did Emma as one of their authors, so i suspect they either sold their rights for a settlement OR they took a 15% agent's cut and Emma got an advance, assuming Emma wasn't already agented.

I subbed my MS a few days ago and just got a request for a full, so very quick on the query / synopsis and we seemed to have skipped the first 3 chapters only as their stated step 2, which is nice. I'm excited about the opportunity given i adored Alice Clayton's and Emma Chase's works.

Undercover
11-27-2013, 10:56 PM
They requested the full from me, I think they even offered a revision. They wanted me to pump up the romance in a big way and the book is more a mystery/suspense. Romance isn't my forte, although, I do have some, just not enough I guess.

I said I would think about it, but never got back to them on it, not yet at least. Not sure I want to go that route.

gingerwoman
12-05-2013, 05:33 AM
They hit the Amazon best seller lists a lot. Congrats on the full request and R and R Lisa! <3

April Marie
12-14-2013, 07:55 PM
They also sold Emma Chase's Tangled in a large deal. That book then dropped off their site as did Emma as one of their authors, so i suspect they either sold their rights for a settlement OR they took a 15% agent's cut and Emma got an advance, assuming Emma wasn't already agented.

I subbed my MS a few days ago and just got a request for a full, so very quick on the query / synopsis and we seemed to have skipped the first 3 chapters only as their stated step 2, which is nice. I'm excited about the opportunity given i adored Alice Clayton's and Emma Chase's works.

Have you heard back from Omnific about your full manuscript? If so, how long did it take them to get back to you?

AuburnAssassin
12-14-2013, 08:50 PM
Yes. I heard...a form rejection...but very fast. I sent full 11/27 and got my R on 12/5.

missmaryb
03-04-2014, 03:41 AM
Sent a query on 2/24 and just received a request for a full.

April Marie
03-18-2014, 11:30 PM
Missmaryb....have you heard back on your full yet?

missmaryb
03-21-2014, 06:11 AM
I did, April. I received an offer from them today after I nudged them because I had received an offer from another publisher. Super excited, obviously, but I've gotten offers from 4 total. They did come in a day late after my deadline, but the response was still very prompt.

uberellis
06-16-2014, 03:09 AM
Hey, thanks for this informative thread-- it caused me to join AW.
I've been writing for years, both speculative fiction and as a tech writer, but hadn't submitted anything for ~16 years. A friend posted in on a social media site a call for submissions for an Omnific published anthology of American Revolutionary-era erotica called Taking Liberties. After checking out the guidelines, I knew I could do a quick "historical found document" [which is what really like to I write] about a secret espionage operation that shored up an easy victory for Gen. Washington at Trenton. It was clever, and I thought worth a shot. Anyway, it got accepted, and I was sent a contract. The friend who brought the call for submissions to my attention is a member of a local [New England] small-press house and a lawyer, so I had her check it out. There is some commission payment framework involved, but I was happier just getting published-- as most of you, I have quite a collection of rejection letters. I emailed back the signed contract electronically to Elizabeth Harper, and sent the hard copy via Priority USPS to their LA, CA address. The hard copy came back to me with a notice of "not at this address." Which struck me as very strange and caused me to search for exactly a thread like this. And the person at Omnific who is is their promoter/marketer and notified my friend of the initial call, sent me some HTML to post on my blog that was an advertisement for something entirely unrelated. Also, the jpg promoting the anthology [below] has a bad link.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/t1.0-9/10366294_698057766921136_5764200181932882180_n.jpg

This all has happened in the past few days and seems very strange...
Anybody have any idea about what gives?
Thanks, Erk

JulieB
06-16-2014, 03:33 AM
I hope they paid Mr. Cumberbatch for the use of his likeness.

AuburnAssassin
06-16-2014, 03:46 AM
Something seems very odd about all this but here it is on Goodreads. That just doesn't seem like Omnific. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22448038-taking-liberties?from_search=true

gingerwoman
06-16-2014, 06:29 AM
Hey, thanks for this informative thread-- it caused me to join AW.
I've been writing for years, both speculative fiction and as a tech writer, but hadn't submitted anything for ~16 years. A friend posted in on a social media site a call for submissions for an Omnific published anthology of American Revolutionary-era erotica called Taking Liberties. After checking out the guidelines, I knew I could do a quick "historical found document" [which is what really like to I write] about a secret espionage operation that shored up an easy victory for Gen. Washington at Trenton. It was clever, and I thought worth a shot. Anyway, it got accepted, and I was sent a contract. The friend who brought the call for submissions to my attention is a member of a local [New England] small-press house and a lawyer, so I had her check it out. There is some commission payment framework involved, but I was happier just getting published-- as most of you, I have quite a collection of rejection letters. I emailed back the signed contract electronically to Elizabeth Harper, and sent the hard copy via Priority USPS to their LA, CA address. The hard copy came back to me with a notice of "not at this address." Which struck me as very strange and caused me to search for exactly a thread like this. And the person at Omnific who is is their promoter/marketer and notified my friend of the initial call, sent me some HTML to post on my blog that was an advertisement for something entirely unrelated. Also, the jpg promoting the anthology [below] has a bad link.



This all has happened in the past few days and seems very strange...
Anybody have any idea about what gives?
Thanks, Erk


I believe they are a digital first publisher and digital first publishers tend to do everything via email. I wouldn't bother trying to snail mail them anything.

I have no personal experience with this publisher, and have no idea if they treat authors well, but I do notice that they have had books that have hit the best seller lists on Amazon so perhaps they have a good marketing team.

frimble3
06-16-2014, 07:54 AM
I hope they paid Mr. Cumberbatch for the use of his likeness.
That was my first thought as well. Maybe they thought having that title right up by his face made it seem cheeky rather than actionable?

uberellis
06-16-2014, 02:36 PM
I believe they are a digital first publisher and digital first publishers tend to do everything via email. I wouldn't bother trying to snail mail them anything.

I received the notice of acceptance on 25 May and she requested the hard copy be sent her by 01 June-- and I overnighted it to arrive the Friday before the deadline. Unless a formal electronic signing app is used, it seems they would still need a signed hard copy of the contract for legal reasons and records. A scan attached to an email doesn't always suffice.

And the are doing physical bound copies of the anthology-- the contract said I get 2 bound copies and 5 electronic ones.

Thanks...

gingerwoman
06-16-2014, 03:32 PM
My digital first publisher puts all books over 50 thousand words into print also. That's what digital first means, digital, before print. I signed the contract on my novel electronically. It's not difficult. Are you saying that Omnerific doesn't have a facility for you to sign digitally? If you're still having problems you might want to email them and ask them how/if you can sign digitally.

uberellis
06-16-2014, 07:27 PM
Are you saying that Omnerific doesn't have a facility for you to sign digitally? If you're still having problems you might want to email them and ask them how/if you can sign digitally.

Exactly-- typically when filling out an online application for employment with a contracting agency, or credit application, etc, they use a sort of plug-in or app that captures your info and authorizes your input as an electronic signature.

Dr Harper requested that I attach the scanned copy of the contract to an email reply and forward the hard copy to the LA address within a week's time. She acknowledged receipt of the scanned copy and the hardcopy's tracking number, but over this past weekend the hardcopy came back to me "return to sender-- not at this address". It smelled funny, and that's what lead me to this thread. I was trying to do some research prior to getting back to them.

Of a bigger concern, was that I was told by her I can't include the story I wrote in my own on-demand [maybe electronic] release of a collection I am putting together.

The people I've dealt with-- E Harper, the editor, and the promoter-- have been nice enough, and nothing really strange have been requested, but...

nkkingston
06-20-2014, 06:56 PM
I know a few publishers still prefer a hard copy signature; I don't know if there's any legal reasons to prefer it, or whether it's just to cover their backs. So, in itself, not suspicious. The envelope coming back undelivered is a bit weird, but it's got a lot of hands to pass through and maybe some are better at reading handwriting than others? Since it did come back, I'd definitely enquire about a digital signature, or an alternate address at least.

Are you talking about including the same story in your self-published collection? Because I completely understand why that's a no from them, since you've almost certainly signed an agreement to let hem publish it exclusively, at least for a certain amount of time.

Alitriona
07-13-2014, 07:59 PM
For a general update on information, Omnific has entered a co-publishing deal with Gallery Books and a distribution through Simon and Schuster.

Here's a bit about it http://authorlink.com/news/gallery-books-and-simon-schuster-inc-in-multifaceted-co-publishing-and-distriution-agreement-with-omnific-publishing/

gingerwoman
07-14-2014, 03:57 PM
I would be very annoyed if a publisher insisted on a hard copy signature as I live in New Zealand so it would be a huge pain. I've never had that problem with anyone I've written for. The Gallery Books thing sounds pretty cool though.

authorMAF
12-23-2015, 03:26 AM
I was thinking of submitting to this publishing press - has anyone had any experience in the past year? :)

authorMAF
05-15-2016, 10:37 AM
Quick question about one of their FAQs answers:


"Because of the significant investment of resources that we make in producing our exceptionally high-quality books (see our rigorous editing process described below), we retain all rights."


Does this mean they have the rights to the books they publish forever, and not the standard 3 - 6 years I've been seeing in other publishers' websites? Is that...normal?

Thedrellum
05-16-2016, 07:14 PM
My guess would be that they keep all distribution rights when they contract a book--foreign language, film/TV/media, etc.--rather than just print and e-book rights. But that language seems unclear, and I'd definitely clarify before signing with them.

authorMAF
05-17-2016, 05:27 AM
My guess would be that they keep all distribution rights when they contract a book--foreign language, film/TV/media, etc.--rather than just print and e-book rights. But that language seems unclear, and I'd definitely clarify before signing with them.


I sent a Tweet asking which email (they have multiple, but none for general info) to send a question about their publishing FAQ. Will update what they send me as a response to that rights part as soon as I get a reply! :)

The Gipper
07-14-2016, 04:56 AM
I sent a Tweet asking which email (they have multiple, but none for general info) to send a question about their publishing FAQ. Will update what they send me as a response to that rights part as soon as I get a reply! :)

Did you ever get a response to that Tweet? I'm not sure what's going on with this publisher. They put out a call for submissions at their Facebook page in early May, but since then have only posted twice on the FB page - about February releases. Their Tweets are mostly about older releases - and there's one saying "check out our new YouTube videos" when the most recent video was posted 2 years ago. Their staff page makes it look like they're operating with a skeleton crew: http://omnificpublishing.com/index.php?main_page=page&id=1&chapter=2. I'd be wary.