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DennisB
02-05-2010, 06:37 PM
I grew up in Idaho, not too far from Ketchum, where Earnest Hemmingway spent his last few years (and where he took his own life). Locals said he was a regular at a couple of the bars there. Of course, I wasn't allowed in those bars (being all of five years old).

Are there still places where the writing illuminati hang out--where a guy could offer to buy a drink or ten in exchange for some sage advice and even a referral to an agent (LOL)?

I suppose nobody has listed phone numbers or addresses these days, but have any of you made contact with some of your literary heroes?

Or are there just so many hangers-on that these folks live like hermits, sequestered months on end in their book-lined studies?

Maryn
02-05-2010, 07:21 PM
My impression is that most writers would be put off by those who seek their guidance, advice, mentoring, and professional referrals for the price of a few drinks. After all, the number of aspiring authors is legion, and the author's free time his/her own. My guess would be that they'd rather talk baseball or politics than shop.

I do know someone online, a screenwriter, whose non-writing interest put him in the presence of a director whose work he greatly admired. They worked together several times a month for over a year, and my acquaintance never once mentioned he wrote screenplays. Only when he and the director stopped for a beer after working together--not the first time--and the director asked what he did for a living did he say he was a writer. He did not ask for any advice, a reading, a referral, or anything else--but he got all three.

Maryn, who would buy a famous author a drink and talk baseball, gladly

backslashbaby
02-05-2010, 07:24 PM
A very famous author lives in my town. I waited on her table many, many times, as a matter of fact. Folks have to eat ;) I don't think people around here are ever surprised to see her, though, because she's lived here for so long. If anyone ever wanted to chat with her, they should look up her projects and volunteer to work on them, btw.

I've met a ton of people like that. Does nobody think of volunteer work? Well, it's an easy secret, then :)

I think conferences or workshops are always among the best places to meet people in many professions. My only writer's conference so far, an AW member and I had a great solo lunch with a bestselling author. Really awesome :)

ETA: Actually, we did talk shop, too. It depends on the chemistry, always. Some folks, you may be bugging so step back, others click fine with you. They are all just people :)

Amarie
02-05-2010, 07:46 PM
You'll probably get far better advice by reading the Learn Writing with Uncle Jim thread and all the stickies in SYW.

CheekyWench
02-05-2010, 07:54 PM
I get all my advice from 'famous' and not so 'famous' writers (and agents) from twitter. The majority of them are insightful, helpful and if you don't badger them, willing to answer a stray question or two. They generally post helpful links or ideas anyway, so you can pick up a lot without having to invade their virtual privacy.

DrZoidberg
02-05-2010, 07:57 PM
I'm convinced famous authors hang on forums, just like this one. But not using their real name. You might already have gotten some advice from a famous author and not know about it.

bluebell80
02-05-2010, 08:07 PM
^^ Yep, they do, sometimes. I've met a few on forums.

Wayne R.
02-05-2010, 08:11 PM
I'm convinced famous authors hang on forums, just like this one. But not using their real name. You might already have gotten some advice from a famous author and not know about it.


Most probably so. On the Michael Slade/Special X forum, the man himself once mentioned that he was a member on one of his favourite author's forums (sorry, can't recall which). Advice is a different thing from chitchat, though. I think this came up once, and there are some very good reasons for a published author not to get too involved in other people's manuscripts.
Occasionally there's a gem of an anecdote, good general advice or cautionary tale that comes out in these discussions, so it's still worth being a member.

Libbie
02-05-2010, 08:49 PM
I grew up in Idaho, not too far from Ketchum, where Earnest Hemmingway spent his last few years (and where he took his own life). Locals said he was a regular at a couple of the bars there. Of course, I wasn't allowed in those bars (being all of five years old).
Cool, another Idaho native! I was born in Rexburg and did a lot of my growing up in the Driggs/Tetonia area.


Are there still places where the writing illuminati hang out--where a guy could offer to buy a drink or ten in exchange for some sage advice and even a referral to an agent (LOL)?

My guess is...everywhere. Most writers blend into crowds really well, and nobody knows they're writers unless they know the guy personally. And most established writers dislike being approached for tips or referrals. Nobody would refer anybody to his agent unless he could vouch for the quality of the work, and the only tip that counts is "write every day."


I suppose nobody has listed phone numbers or addresses these days, but have any of you made contact with some of your literary heroes?

Yes.

I was raised to say "thank you," so whenever I finish reading an unfamiliar writer's work that I really enjoyed, I always take the time to contact them via web sites or blogs and say thanks. It's always a sincere thanks, too.

Often, these "thanks" notes have led to long strings of conversation. I've had lengthy email exchanges with a certain famous insomniac sci-fi writer who was also up and on Gmail at 3:00 a.m. -- and found funny little things I have in common with several literary writers and one well-known fantasy writer, and up-and-coming genre authors who nobody has heard of...yet. They're all equally amazing to me, if they managed to write something that really grabbed me and made me want to tell them how their work touched me. That's a rare thing.

In my experience, writers are friendly, fun people who love to talk about their passions. Always, these conversations started as a "thanks for writing such a great book/story -- I really enjoyed it" from me. I think everybody appreciates thanks, and loves to know that their work has made a difference in another person's life.

However, I would never presume to ask for tips or referrals. Chatting about fun stuff is one thing, but assuming they'll be willing to help me with my career is too off-putting for me to think about. I can get where they are the same way they did it: Hard work, research, taking risks, and persistence.


Or are there just so many hangers-on that these folks live like hermits, sequestered months on end in their book-lined studies?

Haha -- no. Professional writers are all over the place, leading nice, normal social lives with their friends and families. They're probably sitting at the next booth in the restaurant, perusing the shelves at book stores right next to you, and taking too long to write a check at the grocery store while you wait impatiently.

They aren't different or special or mystical or shining with glory -- they're just hard workers.

bearilou
02-05-2010, 08:54 PM
I was raised to say "thank you," so whenever I finish reading an unfamiliar writer's work that I really enjoyed, I always take the time to contact them via web sites or blogs and say thanks. It's always a sincere thanks, too.


I have a favorite book that I want to write the author and tell them just how much I enjoyed it. Sadly, I can't find a website or blog or anything about them. My desperate attempt will be to try to find something through the publisher but they are also small. *flails*

I'll keep trying, though, because it's important to me to let the author know how much I loved the story and the character.

/derail

Wayne K
02-05-2010, 09:26 PM
You'll probably get far better advice by reading the Learn Writing with Uncle Jim thread and all the stickies in SYW.
This, a thousand times.

Wayne K
02-05-2010, 09:27 PM
I'm convinced famous authors hang on forums, just like this one. But not using their real name. You might already have gotten some advice from a famous author and not know about it.
This, but not a thousand times. A few times.

IceCreamEmpress
02-05-2010, 10:00 PM
I'm convinced famous authors hang on forums, just like this one. But not using their real name.

Or using their real names. Nora Roberts (the biggest-selling US romance writer) is a beloved commenter on romance boards under her own name.

augusto
02-05-2010, 11:25 PM
Years ago I attended a conference in Grand Forks, ND, because Raymond Carver was to be there. We had a mutual mentor in John Gardner, who had published my first story. Carver only made it for the last day. I finally found him at a party, with his coat on and anxious to leave. When I mentioned my small connection with Gardner, Carver took off his coat, told his ride to wait and talked with me for ten minutes. Very cool man...

brainstorm77
02-05-2010, 11:27 PM
I have received an email from Charlaine Harris. I sent her an email through her website asking how she keeps her storylines straight and how she goes about editing. She replied with a great email.

Midnight Star
02-05-2010, 11:38 PM
I've been able to contact an author, but that's because my friend personally knows him.

Jamesaritchie
02-06-2010, 12:26 AM
I grew up in Idaho, not too far from Ketchum, where Earnest Hemmingway spent his last few years (and where he took his own life). Locals said he was a regular at a couple of the bars there. Of course, I wasn't allowed in those bars (being all of five years old).

Are there still places where the writing illuminati hang out--where a guy could offer to buy a drink or ten in exchange for some sage advice and even a referral to an agent (LOL)?

I suppose nobody has listed phone numbers or addresses these days, but have any of you made contact with some of your literary heroes?

Or are there just so many hangers-on that these folks live like hermits, sequestered months on end in their book-lined studies?



It's actually pretty easy to meet famous writers, if you live where they do, but I would never try to meet one for the sake of getting advice or a referal. It doesn't take much of that attitude to turn a writer into a hermit.

brainstorm77
02-06-2010, 12:28 AM
I've also been in contact with a mid list romance author through her website. She's been great for answering questions about writing etc...

DWSTXS
02-06-2010, 01:40 AM
I think Stephen King hangs out here on AW

KathleenD
02-06-2010, 02:28 AM
Or using their real names. Nora Roberts (the biggest-selling US romance writer) is a beloved commenter on romance boards under her own name.

She's got a hide like a rhinocerous - when the "Harlequin Horizons" thing first hit, she posted at the Smart Bitches Trashy Books thread, and came under quite a bit of fire from someone who thinks NY publishing is materially different with fewer opportunities than it was when Ms. Roberts started writing.

"La Nora" gave as good as she got, too.

Libbie
02-06-2010, 05:11 AM
She's got a hide like a rhinocerous - when the "Harlequin Horizons" thing first hit, she posted at the Smart Bitches Trashy Books thread, and came under quite a bit of fire from someone who thinks NY publishing is materially different with fewer opportunities than it was when Ms. Roberts started writing.

"La Nora" gave as good as she got, too.

I love her for that alone. The Horizons thing made me cringe.

Libbie
02-06-2010, 05:12 AM
Oh, I should also point out that working in a book store is a great way to meet local writers. We all love books, right? I met Greg Bear and Susan Wiggs while I was a temp at a book store. They were both really cool.

C.bronco
02-06-2010, 05:25 AM
I grew up in Idaho, not too far from Ketchum, where Earnest Hemmingway spent his last few years (and where he took his own life). Locals said he was a regular at a couple of the bars there. Of course, I wasn't allowed in those bars (being all of five years old).

Are there still places where the writing illuminati hang out--where a guy could offer to buy a drink or ten in exchange for some sage advice and even a referral to an agent (LOL)?

I suppose nobody has listed phone numbers or addresses these days, but have any of you made contact with some of your literary heroes?

Or are there just so many hangers-on that these folks live like hermits, sequestered months on end in their book-lined studies?
Oh, it's here! :D

Also, I've emailed a few cool writers, who were really kind about steering me in the right direction.

firedrake
02-06-2010, 05:32 AM
Oh, I should also point out that working in a book store is a great way to meet local writers. We all love books, right? I met Greg Bear and Susan Wiggs while I was a temp at a book store. They were both really cool.

Greg Bear!?

Very envious. Love his stuff.

Years ago I wrote to a writer about her first book (great book, btw..English Civil War historical).

We exchanged letters (yea, it was long before emails), met up a few times, got on really well. Spent a memorable day in Oxford searching second hand book stores for books about Scythians. We still keep in touch. She has an agent I'd love to represent me but I would never dream of asking for a referral or even hinting at it.

MaryMumsy
02-06-2010, 07:39 AM
I have a favorite book that I want to write the author and tell them just how much I enjoyed it. Sadly, I can't find a website or blog or anything about them. My desperate attempt will be to try to find something through the publisher but they are also small. *flails*

I'll keep trying, though, because it's important to me to let the author know how much I loved the story and the character.

/derail

If you can find a snail mail for the publisher send a letter to the author in care of the publisher. It most likely will be passed along. I did that about ten years ago when a fiction author I liked wrote a great non-fiction book. I didn't expect any response, or maybe a form letter from a secretary. I got a personal letter from the author, with his home address on the envelope. We didn't begin a correspondence, but I have seen him a few times at signings.

MM

CoriSCapnSkip
02-06-2010, 07:56 AM
Yes, I have corresponded and conversed with the greatest living writer, if not of all time. I wonder where it goes from here not only because I've already met the best, but because there is a generational difference. Once the greatest generation passes away, we are left, perhaps with reasons, with a paranoid and distant if not hostile populace.

Carlene
02-06-2010, 08:11 AM
Yup, I did that too, MM. I wrote one of my favorite authors via her publisher. She sent me a lovely personalized note.

Carlene

www.manicreaders.com/CarleneRaeDater

thothguard51
02-06-2010, 08:24 AM
Many years ago I corresponded with several writers. I was a bit younger and bolder, or rather, didn't know better than to bother a fewllow writers.

One of my fav's was with Ms Andre Norton. I sent the first letter to her in care of ACE books, I think it was. Within two weeks, I had a letter from her. I talked about her writing and when she found out I was into D&D, she informed me about a book she wrote based on D&D, though she had never played it. This was all while she lived in Fla. I still have her letters and value them greatly.

I have also have corresponded with Ms Ann McCaffery, but she is a bit different or should I say brazen. I never knew if she was responding to me as she did because I was an American, or because I was somewhat naive and annoying. Still, she gave me some of the greatest advice ever. "Nick, go back to school, writing has only one T." It worked...

Robert Jordan is someone I corresponded with a few times, but he was not much help. His letters could drag on and on, or be one liners.

There are others, but Ms Andrea Norton is the one I will always remember and cherish. I do miss that woman.

Anaquana
02-06-2010, 09:45 AM
I chat with a few of my favorite authors all the time on LJ, Facebook, and Twitter. I even occasionally participate in word wars with some of them. Alas, Neil Gaiman has never responded to any of my Tweets, but I suspect he gets so many that to try and answer every one would be impossible.

csdaley
02-06-2010, 10:04 AM
I don't think most authors would mind a general conversation but I would make sure you keep it general. Don't jump off the cliff with questions like, "will you read my manuscript."

RJK
02-06-2010, 05:42 PM
I wrote to John Sanford's website. It's run by his son. I was very new at writing, and had posted my first chapter of my first WIP in SYW. I wrote to the site asking if they'd tell me John's Agent's name.
I heard nothing for a while, then, to my surprise, I heard back. The agent wasn't interested in unpublished authors (they must have asked him). But the big surprise was, Young John had critiqued my chapter. He gave me some good advice and lots of encouragement, telling me my work was much higher quality than he usually saw from aspiring authors. That compliment goaded me on me for at least six months.

Ken
02-06-2010, 06:17 PM
... never have myself. But I have read bio's on famous writer's who've gone that route at the outset of their careers, resulting in valuable connections and lifelong friendships. I think James Baldwin may have wrote Richard Wright and obtained such. And on the other hand there was Branwell Bronte, brother of (((Emily))), Charlotte, and Anne. A writer, himself, along with being a good artist, he wrote Walt Whitman. The poet never replied.

BigWords
02-06-2010, 11:12 PM
If anyone is in San Diego when Comic Con is on, and wants to meet some UK writers, head to the nearest bar. :D A few of the 2000AD folks will undoubtedly be knocking back drinks.

SirOtter
02-07-2010, 03:45 AM
If anyone is in San Diego when Comic Con is on, and wants to meet some UK writers, head to the nearest bar. :D A few of the 2000AD folks will undoubtedly be knocking back drinks.

I was about to say cons are great places to meet pro writers. Finding and joining local clubs or associations specific to your favorite genre is another way. Some writers I've met, for long enough periods to actually do more than fawn and gush, include:

Ted Sturgeon
Gordy Dickson
Stephen King
Whitley Strieber
Peter Straub
Lee Child
Anne McCaffrey
Brian Keene

There are lots more (and I'm not counting a couple I knew before they were famous), but you get the idea. Most of these I've shared drinks or meals with, and had a wonderful time doing it. So, hit those cons, join your local SF society or chapter of Sisters-in-Crime or whatever and mix it up!

willietheshakes
02-07-2010, 03:55 AM
Robert Jordan is someone I corresponded with a few times, but he was not much help. His letters could drag on and on

That's quite a surprise...

Lost World
02-07-2010, 07:11 AM
I wrote an email to John Jakes several years ago involving a scene in American Dreams where a WWI fighter pilot gets shot down by Herman Goerring. He crash lands and survives, though according to the text his hair turns white during the incident, like something out of a cartoon. I asked Jakes about this, wondering if this was based on an actual account. You never know; stranger things have happened.

He responded with a cordial email, admitting that he'd engaged in a bit of hyperbole. Whatever the case, I was thrilled to hear from him. He is the first author I ever read religiously, and his work ethic both in writing and historical research is legendary.

kaitie
02-07-2010, 07:34 AM
I haven't met any famous writers, but I did get to have dinner/dessert with about five of the most brilliant people in the origami world to this day, as well as my absolute favorite, Kamiya Satoshi. That was amazing. I'm absolutely positive I came off as a fan girl, and I was certainly out of my league, but it was still badass. :)

Priene
02-07-2010, 08:48 AM
And on the other hand there was Branwell Bronte, brother of (((Emily))), Charlotte, and Anne. A writer, himself, along with being a good artist, he wrote Walt Whitman.

Branwell was hanging out with Emily, Charlotte and Anne Bronte. Who needs Walt Whitman?

NewKidOldKid
02-07-2010, 08:57 AM
I wrote Richard Bach a letter a few years ago. I totally adored his early books and they meant the world to me when I was going through a very difficult period in my life. He wrote me back a beautiful letter. I was not only amazed but oh so grateful. I cherish that letter like no other.

IceCreamEmpress
02-07-2010, 10:00 AM
Branwell was hanging out with Emily, Charlotte and Anne Bronte. Who needs Walt Whitman?

He didn't recognize his sisters' genius, which is actually quite a tragic story.

However, I don't understand why Bronte would have written to Whitman in the first place. At the time Bronte died, in 1848, the only book Whitman had published so far was a not-very-good novel about temperance.

Seeing as Bronte was an alcoholic, it seems like an odd choice for him to seek out an American novel about abstaining from alcohol. Or had Bronte seen a poem of Whitman's that was reprinted in an English newspaper?

Moonfish
02-07-2010, 09:41 PM
I've emailed an author whose book I loved, saying I understand that she hasn't the time to reply and that there's no need to but I just wanted to tell her how much I enjoyed the book and the MC. And I still got a nice quick thank-you email!

Mostly, I don't see the need to meet or talk to the authors I adore. Often when you meet someone you admire it's a big letdown. They are way more awe-inspiring in my head than they can ever be in real life.

Cranky
02-07-2010, 09:50 PM
I've exchanged a couple of comments with one of my favorite crime writers, but other than that, I've not contacted any famous writers. I wouldn't be able to write anything other than gushing compliments, and while we can never get too many of those, heh, I just can't bring myself to do it.

I figure if I *really* want to compliment them, I'll keep buying their books. If I ever come up with a burning question or something, I may try to write then. :)

Ken
02-07-2010, 09:59 PM
However, I don't understand why Bronte would have written to Whitman in the first place. At the time Bronte died, in 1848, the only book Whitman had published so far was a not-very-good novel about temperance.

Seeing as Bronte was an alcoholic, it seems like an odd choice for him to seek out an American novel about abstaining from alcohol. Or had Bronte seen a poem of Whitman's that was reprinted in an English newspaper?

... you're correct, as usual ;-)
Just looked up the reference in the source I'd got it from: "A Family Called Bronte," by Paula Guzzetti, pg 52. Branwell didn't write to Whitman, but to William Wordsworth, "whom he especially admired, asking for his help in launching his career. But none of his letters was answered, which just added to his despair." (The other letters he sent were to other authors, left unspecified, and publishers, including Blackwood's Magazine in attempt to get himself a staff position.)

LOG
02-08-2010, 01:16 AM
Catching them at social conventions (conventions and the like) would be the best course of actions.
I was lucky enough to get George Martin at the ValleyCon in Fargo-Moorhead a few months back.

Shara
02-08-2010, 01:42 AM
I agree with those who say conventions - I've met quite a few well known writers at such things.

Of course, it depends on how big the convention is, but you normally get a chance to chat to people in the bar or at the drinks reception. If you attend a panel or talk they are giving, you might get a chance to go and say hello at the end.

I've also contacted a few people through their websites. Most of them reply. The majority of writers like to hear from people who like their books, or find them an inspiration for their own writing.

But as already been mentioned, I would advise against sending an email saying 'please will you read my manuscript', as I think that would put most people off.

Shara

DennisB
02-09-2010, 06:48 PM
About 30 years ago, I was the editor of a tiny magazine (bi-monthly with a circulation of about 10,000). One of the guys I interviewed was friends with a grind-out writer who put out two or three non-fiction books a year (usually capitalizing on some fad). Somehow, the three of us got together (along with wives) for a Sunday brunch and I flat out asked the writer if he could refer me to his agent. He did, I contacted the agent, she took me on, we got my "memoir" to the second stage with Random House, but the project died.

I guess my little adventure led me to believe that it should always be this easy.

I'm a people person. I enjoy going into a bar (or coffee shop) and striking up a conversation with a stranger. If that stranger would happen to be a successful writer who could offer insight into our craft (including actually getting published), wouldn't that be grand!

JamieFord
02-09-2010, 07:02 PM
Go to book events, book conferences, lit fests. You'll find most (if not all) are very approachable and down to earth.

Tasmin21
02-09-2010, 07:48 PM
I've found Twitter to be an interesting way of "meeting" other authors. And I hit every local signing Jim Butcher has. He's hilarious to hear speak in person.

At the last one, I had just signed with Roc, and I was so excited to be able to introduce myself to him as more than just a rabid fan. (We share the same editor.) He congratulated me, and said we'd have to do signings together since we both live in the same city (ish).

Richard White
02-09-2010, 09:21 PM
I've been lucky enough to get a guest badge at cons (a lot more when I was doing comics). When you're behind the table, you sort of get inducted into the fraternity as opposed to standing on the "fan" side.

I've had the great pleasure to discuss Cavalry tactics with David Drake in the green room at Dragon*Con, visit with Chris Claremont, Anne McCaffery, Larry Niven, the Brother's Hildebrand and a host of others. (I still remember the hangover from spending an evening visiting with Jason Carter (Marcus from Bab5 . . . ouch.)

But, my greatest memory of meeting someone at a con was getting to visit with Will Eisner before he passed away. I spotted him going through the crowd and had to interecept him. I'm sure he was expecting me to gush over his work on the Spirit or something like that, so the look of surprise when I thanked him for creating P.S. Magazine (the Preventive Services magazine issued to soldiers that uses cartoons as well as words to show how to maintain your equipment) and told him it was manadatory reading for my squad members.

He was shocked and pleased that I knew he was involved with it and we wound up having at least a half-hour conversation about how it came about and who he based the original characters off of and so on until his handlers found us and reminded him he had a panel in ten minutes.

It was fun . . . instead of being the "star" and the "fanboy", (which I was), it was just two old soldiers hanging around swapping stories.

RG570
02-09-2010, 09:34 PM
If you do it right, it can be the best thing you'll ever do . . . I'm going by Dale Carnegie stuff here though, and maybe that doesn't apply anymore.

The key here is if you do it right. Read How To Win Friends And Influence People and you'll see how it works. It involves genuine interest in the person, NOT fanboy BS. Never be a fan. Fans are idiots.

willietheshakes
02-09-2010, 09:53 PM
Read How To Win Friends And Influence People and you'll see how it works. It involves genuine interest in the person, NOT fanboy BS. Never be a fan. Fans are idiots.

I'm not the only one seeing the cognitive disconnect here, am I?

Phaeal
02-09-2010, 10:38 PM
Any fans RG570 doesn't want, he can send my way. My Native American name is Dances with Fans.

SirOtter
02-10-2010, 09:10 AM
But, my greatest memory of meeting someone at a con was getting to visit with Will Eisner before he passed away. I spotted him going through the crowd and had to interecept him. I'm sure he was expecting me to gush over his work on the Spirit or something like that, so the look of surprise when I thanked him for creating P.S. Magazine (the Preventive Services magazine issued to soldiers that uses cartoons as well as words to show how to maintain your equipment) and told him it was manadatory reading for my squad members.

That is a great story. I am majorly envious.

SirOtter
02-10-2010, 09:13 AM
There are others, but Ms Andrea Norton is the one I will always remember and cherish. I do miss that woman.

One of the great missed opportunities of my life is that I lived within fifteen miles of her for the last decade or so of her life, and never made contact. My local writers' group had a meet and greet scheduled when she had her stroke, and she passed on before we could reschedule. The first SF book I read, when I was in third grade in about 1967, was her Star Man's Son. It's partly her fault I turned out the way I did, and I never thanked her for it. I have kicked myself many times since.

SirOtter
02-10-2010, 12:54 PM
A story I just read on the Huffington Post reminded me of something that happened in 1980. Nashville hosted a Star Wars convention that year. As I was standing in the back of a room listening to Peter Mayhew (Chewbacca), I felt a presence fill the double doors behind me. It was like being in the gravity well of a small planet. Or a death star, maybe. I'm 6'1", and I was 22 years old that summer and in the best shape of my life, 210 solid pounds. I turned to see Dave Prowse, the guy in the Darth Vader suit, behind me, and felt like a 98 pound weakling. He turned and left, and I didn't see him again all weekend. He sure made an impression, though.

I wound up chauffering Anthony Daniels (C-3PO) to dinner that night, as I was the only person the con committee could find with an operable vehicle. If you can call a 1974 AMC Hornet operable. Talk about running a con on a shoestring budget. He was a very nice guy, very funny.

Rose English
02-10-2010, 04:50 PM
...if they managed to write something that really grabbed me and made me want to tell them how their work touched me. That's a rare thing....

I've sent emails and handwritten letters to thank an author, and the replies I received, both electronic and hardcopy are amongst my most treasured possessions. I wouldn't approach a writer 'in the flesh' unless it was at a book signing or we were involved in a conversation already.