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View Full Version : I THINK I JUST SAW MY FIRST AMISH PERSON!!!!!!!!!



Lantern Jack
08-07-2005, 09:29 AM
Okay, help me out, here. I think I just saw my very first, honest-to-goodness Amish person. Only, I can't figure out for sure-sure whether he was Amish or not. He wasn't a Rabbi, because he didn't have those little curliecue sideburns. He was dressed like a character out of "Witness," with the ridge of chin- and cheek-hugging beard, the gray shirt and trousers and a vanilla-oyster, wide-brimmed hat. Oh, and the boots. The only other thing was, he had buttons on his shirt, and Amish people condemn buttons as "decorative," and, thus, "vanity". Rather, they use hooks. He was coming out of Tops, but I didn't see a buckboard or horse nearby. Could he have been a Mennonite? Or was he just crazy. Also, they had a battalion of Gideon farmers out and about, passing out tracts and shovel handles laced with the Beads of Faith. My Dad encountered one, but he said he was normal-looking.

Anyway, to give this whole thread a more universal appeal, what was your wackiest encounter with the vanilla brethren? Did you ever watch that Amish reality show on the WB? (Or was that UPN?) Are you Amish? And if so, do you miss buttons? Handguns? Underwear with elastic waistbands? Not to mention sex?

brokenfingers
08-07-2005, 09:55 AM
LOL! This reminds me of a time when I walked into a bar in the northeastern part of Ohio during the day and met a few friends. When it was my turn to get drinks I walked up to the front part of the bar and to my utter amazement, saw two Amish boys playing pool, smoking cigarettes and drinking beer.

Needless to say, the sight left me totally shaken and convinced the end was near.

Lantern Jack
08-07-2005, 10:52 AM
There's Amish, Mennonite, Gideon. I can't think of any other simple-living Puritan types left in the world. Are there any Quakers left?

reph
08-07-2005, 11:49 AM
There are Quakers. I know a member of a local Friends Church. They still have services where silence prevails until somebody feels like speaking. She doesn't dress austerely.

scfirenice
08-07-2005, 04:26 PM
LJ
The Pennsylvania Dutch are similar to Amish but not quite so strict. There are alot of them in Northern MD/Southern Pa, they don't drive (but they will ride in a motorized car) and they use electricity at work (There is a Dutch Market in my area.) They wear suspenders with buttons and plain shirts also with buttons. So Maybe you saw a PD!
S

rhymegirl
08-07-2005, 06:32 PM
Amish people don't have sex?

scfirenice
08-07-2005, 07:14 PM
They have tons of kids so they must.

Dawno
08-07-2005, 07:31 PM
Amish people don't have sex?

it must have something to do with the lack of elastic in their underwear...:rolleyes:

rhymegirl
08-07-2005, 08:08 PM
Yeah, SC. If there are little Amish people running around, I guess there must be some sex going on. But the original poster questioned this aspect of their life.

No elastic in the underwear? Hmm. How does it stay up?

Dawno
08-07-2005, 08:12 PM
drawstrings? suspenders?

rhymegirl
08-07-2005, 08:17 PM
Maybe Velcro?

Inspired
08-07-2005, 08:36 PM
Why wouldn't they have elastic? They definitely have sex! It's for procreation more than recreation, though.

We had Amish hired hands on our farm after I went to college. There are many around my parents' place. My mom knows them pretty well.

Hygiene is not a high priority for most of them; I can attest to that.

scfirenice
08-07-2005, 08:49 PM
They make nice furniture.

robeiae
08-07-2005, 09:40 PM
easy, please...

With regard to the sex thing, don't assume too much. It's not a topic of discussion for Amish or PD. It doesn't mean they don't do it or don't enjoy it...it's a personal matter (good for them!!!).

Rob :)

maestrowork
08-07-2005, 10:07 PM
I admit I'm ignorant of the difference between Amish and PD. Living in Southwestern PA for a long time, I have seen a lot of, I suppose, PDs, especially when I travel across the state. They're really nice people. A lot of PDs come to Pittsburgh. They're not as strict as the Amish, I suppose, because they do take buses or the elevators, and they have buttons (just not zippers). They're always very nice and polite and kind, if somewhat naive.

I guess I am fascinated with them in some way, and have always wanted to live with them for at least a few days. I think that would be a very unique experience (I probably won't last for more than two days -- I've always been a city boy).

Lantern Jack
08-08-2005, 04:00 AM
I don't think it could be Pennsylvania Dutch. I live in New York and Amish types aren't famous for long distance trips. As for the underwear, since underwear wasn't widely worn before 1950, they probably wear long underwear or nothing at all. As for sex, don't you know the Amish are the greatest proponents of artificial insemination?

Cabinscribe
08-08-2005, 04:17 AM
Something tells me that somewhere, there are a bunch of Amish people saying,

"Hey! I think I just saw my first writer!

;)

triceretops
08-08-2005, 04:57 AM
You guys crack me up.

I believe it is also the Shakers who make lovely hand-crafted furnisher that is simplistic and functionally designed. Their motto is, "Hands to work--Hearts to God."

I believe Gary Cooper appeared in a movie about Quakers that was called Friendly Persuasion. Quite a good flick about the culture.
Tri

scfirenice
08-08-2005, 05:29 AM
The Amish can build the hell out of a barn too. As far as the sex thing goes, maybe things so tame on the outside are, uh, you know....

ANNIE
08-08-2005, 06:18 AM
geesh, you guys, I feel like country girl goes to the big city.

I live in rural NE Pa and the Amish are as common as blades of grass around here. Their is no huge difference between PD and Amish it is a religion . they both practice it, as for the difference in dress, it depends on the sect they in. Some are more strict than others that's all.

As far as seeing the amish kids smoking and drinking, at 17 years or so they are allowed one week to do pretty much what ever they want and thenthey have to decide if they want to stay or leave. If they leave, they are shunned and can never return. Most stay. Don't be too critical you would be surprised how alike you are to them.

they hygeine part- whew! you got that part right!
They are for the most part a very interesting culture.

Lantern Jack
08-08-2005, 10:51 AM
Not blery likely. As a writer, aren't the Amish the "anti-literati"? I mean, we've devoted our lives to free thinking, passion and creative outflow. They believe in narrow-mindedness, supression of emotion and stymying creativity.

P.H.Delarran
08-08-2005, 12:22 PM
I once met a Mennonite who was traveling with a group of friends cross-country. One of them was competing in the pro-rodeo curcuit. I'll tell you a secret...these five young spent a fine wad of money to rent a well-equipped conversion van, slip seductively into brand new Wranglers and purchase more than their share of condoms; they were just itching to immerse themselves in American Culture.

Inspired
08-08-2005, 03:51 PM
Mennonites are quite a step forward from Amish.

I had the weirdest experience in the mall a month ago. I looked over to the Select Comfort (Sleep number bed) store, and there was an Amish-looking couple. I started laughing. I can just see hooking that up to the generator or sharing it with 10 kids.

Anyway, they came out and I could see them better. When they talked on their cell phone, I knew they couldn't be Amish. At least, not the Amish we have around here. They're pretty conservative bunch. I think these guys were conservative-dressing Mennonites or something.

I find it a bit strange that the Amish (around here) don't allow the playing of musical instruments, except the harmonica. And, they don't really get into the whole Jesus idea. It's all about rules and law, not about salvation through grace. I won't get into a theological debate, because I don't know enough about their religion. But, that's the impression I get. Instruments are mentioned in the Bible, many times, especially the old testament.

WriteRead
08-08-2005, 09:05 PM
Once, when eating in an Amish restaurant I saw a black woman dressed in Amish clothes and this is quite uncommon, in fact very. I couldn't resist and I stared at her when she sensed it and stared back at me defiantly, mocking me, almost, which I rightly deserved.

You should see the Orthodox Jews and their very, very austere ways of living and dressing and all. The Amish look almost similar to a certain type of them in their black clad and hats and beards, but the long, curled, sideburns.

The PD term is a misnomer for them, since it is derived mistakenly from the fact that (quote Wikipedia) "most Amish families speak a version of German known as Pennsylvania German at home. The commonly-used term "Pennsylvania Dutch" comes from a corruption of "Deutsch", the German-language word for "German"."

As for their lifestyle (again, from Wikipedia; a bit long, but very infoive; note the buttons issue and the 'careful writer'):

"The avoidance of items such as automobiles and electricity is largely misunderstood. The Amish do not view all technology as evil. Technologies can be petitioned for acceptance into the Amish lifestyle. Twice a year the church leaders meet to review items for admittance.

Electricity, for instance, is viewed as a connection to the "English" or "Yankees" (the outside world). The use of electricity also could lead to the use of household appliances that would complicate the Amish tradition of a simple life. However, in certain Amish groups electricity can be used in very specific situations. In some groups, for example, it has to be produced without access to outside power lines. Twelve-volt batteries are acceptable to these groups. Electric generators can only be used for welding, recharging batteries, and powering milk stirrers. The reasoning behind the twelve-volt system is that it limits what an individual can do with the electricity and acts as a preventive measure against potential abuses. Most twelve-volt power sources can't generate enough current to power what is viewed as worldly, such as modern appliances such as televisions, light bulbs, and hair dryers.

Most Amish families speak a version of German known as Pennsylvania German at home. The commonly-used term "Pennsylvania Dutch" comes from a corruption of "Deutsch", the German-language word for "German".

Dress code for some groups includes prohibitions against buttons, allowing only pins to keep clothing closed; other groups allow members to sew buttons onto clothing. The Amish are noted for the quality of their quilts and for their farming efficiency. Interestingly, Amish have enthusiastically adopted genetically engineered crops for their efficiency.

The reason that most Amish men are seen with beards but no mustaches is this: An Amish man will typically be clean-shaven as long as he is single. Upon getting married he will grow a beard. Mustaches are generally not allowed since they are seen as symbols of the military.

The Amish do not believe that a child can be meaningfully baptized. Amish children are expected to follow the will of their parents in all issues, but at the age of sixteen they come of age and may lead a lifestyle of their own choice. In fact, in some communities they are permitted to try out the "English" lifestyle of the outside world for a few years (the period of rumspringa (running-around), as shown in the film The Devil's Playground), so that they can make an informed choice to be baptized and join the church for life. Some 10% choose not to join the church but live the rest of their lives in the society at large.

One must be careful when trying to understand the Amish lifestyle. Each community may be slightly or even drastically different from another community. When describing details on dress codes, lifestyles, etc., a careful writer will note the specific community being discussed. Most so-called facts regarding the Amish actually do not apply to all Amish communities.

The Amish as a whole are beginning to feel the pressures of the modern world. Child labor laws, for example, are seriously threatening their long-established ways of life. Amish children are taught at an early age (by modern 21st century standards) to work hard. Amish parents will supervise the children in new tasks to ensure that they learn to do it effectively and safely. The modern child labor laws conflict with allowing the Amish parents to decide whether or not their children are competent in hazardous tasks.

Like the Mennonites, they also shun insurance, seeing misfortune as "God's will". When accidents do strike they rely on their church and community for support. Such support is often in the form of barn raising, in which the entire community gathers together in a single day to replace a barn which has been destroyed by fire or some natural disaster.

Although the Amish do pay most taxes, they are exempt from Social Security under a provision of the Medicare bill enacted in 1965. As part of shunning insurance, the Amish do not accept government welfare, such as medicaid/medicare, and food stamps."

Dan

Good Word
08-08-2005, 10:39 PM
They make nice furniture.

Hmmm, you don't say. Never sat on an Amish person before.

Ba-da-bing!

Carole
08-09-2005, 08:31 AM
I believe it is also the Shakers who make lovely hand-crafted furnisher that is simplistic and functionally designed. Their motto is, "Hands to work--Hearts to God."


Bah! You beat me to it! All through this thread I have been muttering to myself "It's the Shakers....the Shakers, not the Amish!"

jackie106
08-09-2005, 09:36 AM
If you wanna see Amish people up close, take Amtrak or Greyound through the Midwestern states. There are a lot of Amish in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana.

Jackie

Lantern Jack
08-10-2005, 12:51 AM
of my capacity for breeding trivial tangents like this one. Then I stumbled upon one of the best quotes I've ever read in "The Power of One": "Good conversational debate is an end in itself, and talking for the love of conversation is what makes us human."

Shwebb
08-10-2005, 01:07 AM
When I lived on a commune in Canton, Ohio, our nearest neighbors were Amish. We went to visit them once; we were the only "Englishers" they would sell their milk to. Mr. Coblentz had a dairy business, and he was allowed to have electricity wired to his barn so he could maintain the temperature of his milk and he had a phone there so he could be available to his wholesale customers. Even though they could not own a car, they were allowed to ride in one. A couple of times a year someone from our church would take him big-time shopping for supplies he wasn't able to find locally.

I don't think they had any pictures adorning the walls of their house, and I discovered, to a bit of embarrassment, that they don't name their animals. One of the little girls was outside playing with her cat, and I asked her what its name was. She looked at me as though I was crazy. Oops.

Amish, because they are such a close-knit community, can also have a problem with intermarriage. It was common in that community for there to be at least one Down's Syndrome child or one that had some sort of chromosomal abnormality.

I'll tell you, though, they were great neighbors! (And as a teenage girl, I loved watching the young men handle those great, big draft stallions in the fields!)

astonwest
08-10-2005, 01:31 AM
I always smile whenever I see the title of this thread...
because of the idea of someone substituting any number of other terms (races/religions/etc) in for the word Amish...

I think the folks near here are Mennonite, but I've never researched enough to know for sure.

MadScientistMatt
08-11-2005, 12:41 AM
I'm part Pennsylvania Dutch. However, I don't see my Mennonite relatives very often except at the occasional family reunion, so I'm afraid I would not be able to answer too many questions about them. Mennonites do dress in a similar manner to the Amish and practice a similar level of austerity, but they are more accepting of technology. And, as you can guess by the fact that I do see them at family reunions, they aren't into shunning relatives who join other Christian denominations.

On the other hand, since I go to a Baptist church like my parents do, we haven't gone all that far from the Mennonites theologically. From what I understand, the Mennonites, Amish, and Baptists are all connected to the same branch of Protestantism, with the Baptists being the more liberal of the three. (And given the reputation Baptists have...)

spanner3
11-25-2007, 06:15 PM
They have tons of kids so they must.


They have a tiny gene pool

Maggie

spanner3
11-25-2007, 06:17 PM
If you wanna see Amish people up close, take Amtrak or Greyound through the Midwestern states. There are a lot of Amish in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana.

Jackie


I wrote this complaint to the Amish Tourist Board.....I thought. I was feeling a bit bored at the time.

<<Good Day

I have just seen this site
http://www.awawatchdog.com/0205/index.htm

You and your religious beliefs now disgust me, as they will disgust the hundreds of people I intend to email your address and this link to.

People like you should be, made to live in filth and degradation, like God's animals which you so freely abuse.

Yes, you do still live in the Dark ages, and should have become extinct along with the Dinosaur.

This will be spread as far and wide, as the internet now makes possible.

May you rot in Hell, because be assured, God has no place for people like you>>



Unfortunately I'd sent it to some guy who sold Amish furniture, and wrote books about them. He was the most arrogant pig I've ever dealt with. He threatened to sue me (until I told him I lived in the UK).

He reported me to every internet body possible, and gave me a whole month of fun and enjoyment arguing with him.

I tend not to mention Amish much these days.

Maggie

Silver King
11-25-2007, 08:19 PM
Um, Maggie, I find that letter to be in extremely poor taste.

Also, why are you bringing up all these old threads? I feel like I'm spiraling through a time warp or something.

Jean Marie
11-25-2007, 08:35 PM
That is the worst, most degrading letter I think I've ever read. Why in the world would you ever write such a thing?

It was suggested that I follow the link that our dear Maggie left. I did. I still think she's a spammer. And I still feel that the letter's disgusting. You do. not. degrade a population of people for something that they do, even when it's wrong.

I abhor puppy mills. There are many in other states that engage in this practice, as well. Such as, TN, Virginia, etc. So, according to this poster, should we wipe them off the map, too. I didn't think so.

Obviously, most of us know better how to deal w/ a practice we don't believe in. As for me, I'm already involved w/ this one in my state, CT. It's not too difficult, either. You write your state legislature, regularly, to disallow the sale of puppy mill pups to local pet stores. You arrange pickets, I've done this, of stores that you know are selling these pups. And, most importantly, you spread the word to others.

Writing hate letters, downing a population, like spanner/Maggie has done, Does not work.

Thank you.

Devil Ledbetter
11-25-2007, 08:41 PM
I get hate mail like that sometimes, being online and a vocally pro-choice atheist. I think the people who write me nasty letters need therapy and heavy medication.

Do they really think I'm going to change my ways because they declared I deserve to rot in hell? :roll:

Jean Marie
11-25-2007, 08:49 PM
Yeah, but does it need to posted here? No. Which begs the question, why did she join AW ?

Rolling Thunder
11-25-2007, 09:02 PM
Because she's posted work in SYW, Jean, to get help on her writing.

And note; it's S-p-a-n-n-e-r...not spammer. If you follow the link in her post you'll see what she was referring to.

ETA: Egad. I've posted in a LanternJack thread. I feel unclean. :tongue

scarletpeaches
11-25-2007, 09:07 PM
So, an entire religious movement is to go to hell based on the actions of a few within that group?

And if someone wants to protest, there are better ways of doing it than spewing such a vitriolic letter that only makes the sender look like a fruit-loop, certainly not the Amish people she rails against.

Jean Marie
11-25-2007, 09:11 PM
Because she's posted work in SYW, Jean, to get help on her writing.

And note; it's S-p-a-n-n-e-r...not spammer. If you follow the link in her post you'll see what she was referring to.

ETA: Egad. I've posted in a LanternJack thread. I feel unclean. :tongue
I've edited my post to reflect that, RT. I still think it's, spammer. Sorry.


So, an entire religious movement is to go to hell based on the actions of a few within that group?

And if someone wants to protest, there are better ways of doing it than spewing such a vitriolic letter that only makes the sender look like a fruit-loop, certainly not the Amish people she rails against.
Couldn't agree more. And, I said as much. I didn't care for the other insults, either. Especially in the mammo thread.

My sentiments are: Go screw.

Rolling Thunder
11-25-2007, 09:11 PM
I'm bringing you Dean Koontz books for Christmas this year, Scarlet.

scarletpeaches
11-25-2007, 09:13 PM
Splendid. I lent someone my copies of Intensity and Strangers and never got them back. I also like the Christopher Snow novels.

nerds
11-25-2007, 09:33 PM
I tend not to mention Amish much these days.

Maggie


Really? Then why dig up an ancient thread most of which makes Amish people sound like amusing objects instead of people, and then post such a vile piece of shite as you did? EH ??? What? I can't hear you. You don't mention Amish much these days? Huh ???????? Jiminy feckin' Crickets and a lot of other unprintable words too.

Silver King
11-25-2007, 09:50 PM
I don't think Maggie is going to respond.

Locking this one with the gentle reminder: If you're going to bring up an old thread, please have something useful to say.

Thank you.