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Bushdoctor
02-02-2010, 04:31 AM
I am not sure if this is the right forum but I have a question.

Has anyone ever signed with a publisher or an agent and then another recieved an offer from their dream agent/pub when it is too late... if you have - How does it feel and can u tell us how exactly it happened?

skippingstone
02-02-2010, 04:57 AM
That sounds like the plot of "The Heartbreak Kid."

Bushdoc, is there something you want to tell us? Or do you have a "friend" who's going through this exact thing at the moment?

kellion92
02-02-2010, 06:37 AM
I knew you had a hot property, Bushdoctor! If you've signed with a publisher, I'm not sure you can get out of that contract easily. Most agency agreements, however, only require written notice of 30 or 60 days to terminate. And yet, I suspect that few agents would knowingly woo an author under those circumstances. I would hope that an agreement would have more commitment on both sides.

suki
02-02-2010, 06:41 AM
I knew you had a hot property, Bushdoctor! If you've signed with a publisher, I'm not sure you can get out of that contract easily. Most agency agreements, however, only require written notice of 30 or 60 days to terminate. And yet, I suspect that few agents would knowingly woo an author under those circumstances. I would hope that an agreement would have more commitment on both sides.

If you already have a signed contract with a publisher or an agent, get a lawyer to read it and advise you on if and how to terminate.

While it's true that many agency agreements only require notice to terminate, many also say that even if you terminate, the agent has the right to shop (really, to be paid a commission for) anything worked on during the agreement - so, if you have already been working with an agent, you may not be able to terminate for this book without still owing the agent a commission.

So...you need advice on your specific contract and situation. Find a good attorney and pay for a few hours of his or her time.

And, as a caveat, few agents would think highly of someone being a capricious and changeable client - so make sure that you aren't tarnishing your reputation and burning your relationship with both possible agents, by even discussing representation with one, after you have already accepted representation by another.

~suki

kellion92
02-02-2010, 07:02 AM
As always, Suki is smarter than I am.

Bushdoctor
02-02-2010, 10:44 AM
@ Skippingstone it is happening to me right now
@ Kellion thank you for your faith in me. I have signed with the publisher but I have no intentions of backing out of a contract which I have signed - as a matter of principal of course. It would just be dishonourable to do that
@ Suki I think you are right when you say that few agents would want to deal with someone that capricious. I have signed and I have to honour my commitment.

Has this dilemma happened to any of u guys personally or do u know anyone who might have experienced this sort of thing

Twizzle
02-02-2010, 04:43 PM
Oh, sure. A few people, actually. It's irrelevant, though.

There's actually a name for this. I'll have to see if I can find it. I read a few articles about it somewhere, hmmm. Anyway. Don't know if it's true or not but I loved the theory.

Seems there's basically two main types of decision-makers-those who angst over finding the perfect resolution and those who angst over making a good decision.

The first are almost never happy with the outcome-because something bigger, better, and more perfect will always come down the pike. Always. So you will always be disappointed and kicking yourself in the ass over regret.

But if you try and make a good decision, and feel it is a good decision for you (maybe not the best or most perfect, but a good satisfying decision) people are almost always happy and content with the outcome.

So, ultimately, it's not the decision or what you decide but how you view your decision. So really, how others responded would be irrelevant if they viewed their initial decision in a different light than you or others.

Good for you for sticking with it. :)

kaitie
02-02-2010, 07:10 PM
Do you have any other works you're doing? If the agent is interested, I would explain that you had already signed with a publisher (did you let said agent know in advance so they could get back to you? If not, lesson for future reference), but that if he/she's still interested you have some other works you would like them to look at. It might be that they would be interested in taking you on for another piece. At the very least, it's going to be something that looks really good next time you're sending out queries. "You offered me representation" is going to be a pretty big plus in your favor.

I wouldn't try to get out of any contracts at this point, but focus more on your next work.

kellion92
02-02-2010, 08:06 PM
Hey BD, I know you want commiseration, but unfortunately, no one yet wants to publish my book so I've had no opportunity for seller's remorse. But here's a relevant post from Noah Lukeman:
http://askaliteraryagent.blogspot.com/2010/01/can-i-fire-my-agent-mid-submission.html

Bushdoctor
02-03-2010, 09:46 AM
@ Twizzle - thanks for that. I have come to terms with my decision.
@ Katie - I have learnt my lesson. I am working on something else now and looking at my previous work I think I am only getting better. It is just a matter of time before I nab my dream agent.
@ Kellion - Rhanks for the post. I read it and enjoyed it. Lukeman talks a lot of sense. If I were you I wouldnt worry too much about getting a deal. There was a time I thought I would get instant success but now I look back I dont think anything is wasted. your writing can only get stronger with time and you will get that deal.