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View Full Version : There are no more word processors. How would you write?



akmacca
01-27-2010, 10:38 AM
Let's say you wake up one morning and your computer is gone. What's more so has every other computer on the planet. But you have an unfinished story to tell, one that needs to be written.

How will you write it?

Do you write with a pencil or a fountain pen. Perhaps a crayon or a quill?

Do you write on paper or papyrus, a stone tablet perhaps. Maybe the end of a burnt stick scratched on the wall of a cave?

How would you communicate your story?

Claudia Gray
01-27-2010, 10:39 AM
I believe the IBM Selectric would still be available.

bettielee
01-27-2010, 10:39 AM
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaggggggggggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhh hhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

**runs away**

Wayne K
01-27-2010, 10:42 AM
This actually happened to me. I was 14 years old. :D

I wrote my first book with a typewriter.

kuwisdelu
01-27-2010, 10:51 AM
WHAT ABOUT MY OLD, SAVED STORIES??!??

WHAT HAPPENS TO THEM??!?ONE11!?

kuwisdelu
01-27-2010, 10:51 AM
Typewriter.

Or hammer and chisel.

bettielee
01-27-2010, 10:55 AM
**deep breath**

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagggggggghhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!

willietheshakes
01-27-2010, 10:57 AM
Same way I do every morning: fountain pen and notebook.

Medievalist
01-27-2010, 11:03 AM
Do you write with a pencil or a fountain pen. Perhaps a crayon or a quill?

Do you write on paper or papyrus, a stone tablet perhaps.

I actually can and have done all of these, right down to cutting my own quill or reed, and shaping the tablet and preparing velum, papyrus and parchment, but I'd probably use my Smith Corona for final copy and my fountain pens for draft.

Anaquana
01-27-2010, 11:07 AM
I would dictate to somebody else and have them write it down. I'm developing nerve issues in my wrists and elbows, so writing for too long has me in agony the next day. Which kind of sucks because I love the act of writing.

Terie
01-27-2010, 11:08 AM
Fountain pen. Waterman. With purple ink.

Until relatively recently, I did all my first drafting by hand. With my favourite Waterman fountain pen filled with purple ink. :)

I love the physical process of writing almost as much as the creative process of writing. But with a full-time job and not enough time, I switched to first-drafting on an AlphaSmart. It's a lot faster to shoot the MS to my PC through a cable than to retype the handwritten words. But, hey, my writing career started at least two decades before home PCs were 'the thing', so while I might not like it, yeah, I could go back to handwriting and typing.

But I'd really rather not. :D

scarletpeaches
01-27-2010, 11:13 AM
I wrote the first draft of my first book longhand. All 150k of it. In six months.

thethinker42
01-27-2010, 11:14 AM
Crap. I can't read my own handwriting.

Libbie
01-27-2010, 11:35 AM
I'll use quantum entanglement to make the words appear on paper.

willietheshakes
01-27-2010, 11:44 AM
I wrote the first draft of my first book longhand. All 150k of it. In six months.

350K of the current WIP, 3 600 page notebooks, all longhand, all fountain pen.

Matera the Mad
01-27-2010, 11:52 AM
I whang on a drum and chant.

I don't use a word processor anyway, I use a nice, sensible plain text editor.

NeuroFizz
01-27-2010, 11:58 AM
I believe the IBM Selectric would still be available.
I wrote my dissertation on an IBM Selectric (the diss. is three inches thick), and when I took my first faculty position, a computer was something that took up an entire room, and was inaccessible to 99% of the population. Hand-held calculators were the big thing, spelling the end of slide rules (pity to all who held stock in the Pickett company). But that Selectric was a thing of beauty--such a technological jump from manual typewriters, even other electric ones. They were in such short supply we were not allowed to get one as part of our faculty start-up package. Frickin's strange, looking back.

My first personal computer was a Franklin Ace 1000, which beat the original Apple computer because the Franklin had 64K of memory and the Apple had only 48K. I thought I was the shit because of that.

kaitie
01-27-2010, 12:12 PM
I always used to write longhand and then type because I didn't have a computer. I still write longhand on trains, at restaurants, etc. The whole typing the story straight instead of writing it in a notebook is a relatively new thing for me. I also revised by hand. I went through about nine drafts of my first novel this way (which doesn't say much considering how much it still sucks). I still have the old handwritten copies at home somewhere.

blacbird
01-27-2010, 12:31 PM
Longhand on yellow legal pads, same as I do much of the time now.

Producing a submittable manuscript would be more of a bitch, though.

caw

aadams73
01-27-2010, 01:24 PM
Blood on the skins of my enemies.

thethinker42
01-27-2010, 01:36 PM
Blood on the skins of my enemies.

Tattooing would be more effective. Blood washes off, you know.

Priene
01-27-2010, 02:05 PM
I'd dig my manual typewriter out of the garage. Don't know how easy it would be to find new ribbons.

Terie
01-27-2010, 02:12 PM
I wrote my dissertation on an IBM Selectric (it's three inches thick), and when I took my first faculty position, a computer was something that took up an entire room, and was inaccessible to 99% of the population. Hand-held calculators were the big thing, spelling the end of slide rules (pity to all who held stock in the Pickett company). But that Selectric was a thing of beauty--such a technological jump from manual typewriters, even other electric ones. They were in such short supply we were not allowed to get one as part of our faculty start-up package. Frickin's strange, looking back.

Wow! Your IBM Selectric was only three inches thick? Mine was much thicker, I'm sure of it. ;) (Sorry, I couldn't resist.)

The beginning of my office-job career was just as pretty much anyone who had to type was (finally!) getting a Selectric. Oh, the fun switching the typeface balls! Oh, the wheedling to get your boss to approve an order for a new typeface ball! OMG! A typewriter that could now type in italics!!!

The manual typewriter my family had when I was growing up was so old (probably manufactured in the 1920s or 30s) required so much pressure to press a key that when I got an electric typewriter as my high school graduation gift, it took WEEKS for me to adjust to the lighter touch. IIIIttt wwwwaaaassssssssss aaaaaaaa hhhhhhaaaaaaarrrrrrddddd aadddddjjjjuuussssttttmmmmmmmeeeeeeennnnnnnttt!!!! 11!!!!1!!

Me much preferring computers! :D

KTC
01-27-2010, 02:26 PM
Let's say you wake up one morning and your computer is gone. What's more so has every other computer on the planet. But you have an unfinished story to tell, one that needs to be written.

How will you write it?

Do you write with a pencil or a fountain pen. Perhaps a crayon or a quill?

Do you write on paper or papyrus, a stone tablet perhaps. Maybe the end of a burnt stick scratched on the wall of a cave?

How would you communicate your story?

WHAT?



There are no more word processors. How would you write?

The same way I did before there were word processors. It's called a TYPEWRITER.


I feel strongly that I am in an OP thread.

KTC
01-27-2010, 02:28 PM
350K of the current WIP, 3 600 page notebooks, all longhand, all fountain pen.

Is THAT why we're waiting so long!? 350K! Come on! Get it done. (-:

LuckyH
01-27-2010, 02:59 PM
WHAT ABOUT MY OLD, SAVED STORIES??!??

WHAT HAPPENS TO THEM??!?ONE11!?

If you get the new Apple iTablet, unless I misunderstand the concept, Apple will decide what content you can store on it, and if they donít like it, they will delete it. So if youíve loaded up your old stuff . . .

I must have that wrong.

Ken
01-27-2010, 03:07 PM
... didn't own a comp when I began writing. Used a pen and paper. So suppose I'd manage, again. Typing things out on a typewriter is a real hassle though. No way to fix mistakes, except with smelly white-out. And the corrections don't look all that good either.

pink lily
01-27-2010, 03:08 PM
I still have my typewriter from college.

Phaeal
01-27-2010, 05:53 PM
Please, don't scare me. I'm one of those who remember the days before personal computers. I started out on a Royal portable. But as soon as I had access to a computer (at university, later at work), I started writing on it (and saving my data on magnetic cards -- huge, slippery stacks of them.)

I compose differently on the screen -- the ability to make instant and seamless changes makes it seem to me more like sculpting beautifully pliant clay.

I still use notebooks, but mainly for just that: notes. And very rough drafts.

If I had to go back in time, I'd probably skip the typewriter (except for MS prep) and return to my primitive system of notebooks, scissors and tape. But I wouldn't be happy.

Alpha Echo
01-27-2010, 05:57 PM
I love the act of writing.

I do too, though I type my WIPs. There is absolutely nothing like a clean sheet of paper and a nice pen. So that's how I'd write - on college ruled paper with my favorite pen.

brokenfingers
01-27-2010, 06:04 PM
I was originally going to say I'd write pen and paper, but thinking about it now, I think I'd probably just make it a graphic novel.

firedrake
01-27-2010, 06:09 PM
After twitching and shaking for several hours, I'd get out a narrow-lined spiral bound notebook, one of the thick ones, and a blue ball point pen. I've written a couple of novels that way.

AnonymousWriter
01-27-2010, 06:14 PM
Typewriter. If I couldn't find my brother's old one, then pencil and paper.

Elaine Margarett
01-27-2010, 06:15 PM
Ha, I probably wouldn't. Not that I haven't before, but now?

I'd follow another passion. I have lots of them. ;-)

Bubastes
01-27-2010, 06:16 PM
I'd go back to the way I used to write: pen, paper, and typewriter.

Jamesaritchie
01-27-2010, 06:22 PM
I'd write them the same way I do now, which is with a pen and paper. Sometimes with a dip pen. I, too, have written novels with a manual typewriter, and an electric typewriter.

And like Medievalist, I've cut my own quill and used it to write many a story. I used to do a lot of work in a remote cabin that had no electricity, and I have, in fact, cut my own quill, made my own paper and ink, and used them to write stories by kerosene lamp. It's remarkable how fast and easy the writing goes when you have no bells, no whistles, no internet, no computer, no word processor, no phone, no TV, and no distractions.

Good fiction is written with wetware, not software.

icerose
01-27-2010, 06:31 PM
Hopefully I'd have a head start to print out all my work...

If I could then I'd be okay, wouldn't be happy, but I'd be okay. I'd write mostly on paper then very carefully type up the final draft on the typewriter, but like I said, would not be happy.

icerose
01-27-2010, 06:33 PM
Good fiction is written with wetware, not software.

Dang it James! You mean me staring at my word processor all day won't cause it to quiver and spit out my brilliant writing without me putting in any effort? :e2bummed:

lucidzfl
01-27-2010, 07:38 PM
I used to swear by pen and paper. I have stacks and STACKS of notebooks, from trunked novels still laying around. I bought a binder for each and kept all of the notebooks in them.
I can't imagine doing it now. I can type so much faster than I can write, and its legible in the morning.

C.M.C.
01-27-2010, 07:39 PM
I would give up. I don't have the energy to try writing anything that moves slower than it would on a computer. Even this can be too slow, compared with how fast my mind tells me I should be going.

Chris P
01-27-2010, 07:41 PM
I still do a bit of writing on pen and paper, especially when traveling. My in-laws have a lake house and I have spent MANY a morning amid the cool breeze and jumping catfish putting my fevered thoughts to paper.

Roll on summer!

Jamesaritchie
01-27-2010, 08:14 PM
I can type so much faster than I can write, .

So can I. That's why I hate word processors.

Jamesaritchie
01-27-2010, 08:17 PM
I would give up. I don't have the energy to try writing anything that moves slower than it would on a computer. Even this can be too slow, compared with how fast my mind tells me I should be going.

Exactly why I don't use a word processor. I've found that slower is always better for me, and that, in fact, slower is actually a heck of a lot faster because I think way ahead of where I write, so what I intend to wirte may change several times before the words actually go down on paper.

Which means the first draft doesn't need much work to become the final draft.

Jamesaritchie
01-27-2010, 08:18 PM
Dang it James! You mean me staring at my word processor all day won't cause it to quiver and spit out my brilliant writing without me putting in any effort? :e2bummed:

If you find a word processor that works that way, let me know. I'll throw out my pens, rip up all my paper, and never again complain about word processors.

scarletpeaches
01-27-2010, 08:21 PM
I can't believe there are writers who would give up. Does that mean they're writers with conditions? As long as it's easy, they'll do it?

Although, of course, I have previously said that if certain terms and conditions would make one quit, then...maybe that's for the best.

DeleyanLee
01-27-2010, 08:33 PM
I'm also of the generation that's been writing longer than there's been personal computers. Going back to pen and paper and/or a typewriter isn't a heartache. I've actually been debating on doing just that 'cause computers are FAR too distracting from the creative process.

But, then, I've often been accused of being a Luddite. *shrug*

Red-Green
01-27-2010, 08:35 PM
I wrote my first "novel" at 14, when the only computer available was a Trash-80 at school. I wrote the first draft long hand and then typed the revised draft on my grandmother's typewriter. It sucked. The book, not the process. It really wasn't that terrible, although it wasn't as easy as doing it on a computer.

Rhoda Nightingale
01-27-2010, 08:39 PM
Well first I'd shove my brain back in through my ears (it will have exploded upon realizing my dear, sweet lappy up and vanished) and hunt for my flashdrive. Assuming the flashdrive is still there, I'd take a deep breath and crack open one of the three hundred journals I already have in my possession and keep right on going. Most of my stories start out long-hand, so that's no big deal.

maestrowork
01-27-2010, 08:48 PM
this thread makes me want to take out my electric typewriter from storage...

pink lily
01-27-2010, 08:50 PM
this thread makes me want to take out my electric typewriter from storage...
My husband wants me to take my typewriter out of storage... and get rid of it.

He is mean.

scarletpeaches
01-27-2010, 08:53 PM
I wrote my first "novel" at 14, when the only computer available was a Trash-80 at school. I wrote the first draft long hand and then typed the revised draft on my grandmother's typewriter. It sucked. The book, not the process. It really wasn't that terrible, although it wasn't as easy as doing it on a computer.Oh! My! God!

I was just going to ask if anyone else remembers the TRS-80s. :D

Those were the days. :D

Libbie
01-27-2010, 08:54 PM
You wake up tomorrow and there is no more electricity. How do you write?


...kidding. I'm kidding.

scarletpeaches
01-27-2010, 08:55 PM
My laptop is powered by small orphaned boys turning a wheel in my dungeon.

DeleyanLee
01-27-2010, 08:57 PM
You wake up tomorrow and there is no more electricity. How do you write?


...kidding. I'm kidding.


Heh. I was part of the great black-out in the Midwest where we didn't have power for nearly a week. Some of the best writing time I had in a long time.

Of course, I'm very glad no one else tried to read my scrawls.

Makes me wonder about how submission rules were before the 1880's when typewriters became standard.

Jamesaritchie
01-27-2010, 08:58 PM
But, then, I've often been accused of being a Luddite. *shrug*

As far as I'm concerned, being called a Luddite isn't an acusation, it's a compliment.

Which is why I usually call my pen Luddite Word Processor 2.0.

Adam
01-27-2010, 09:02 PM
Typewriter. Should they disappear too, it'd be a Parker rollerball and an A4 lined pad. :)

Shadow_Ferret
01-27-2010, 09:17 PM
There are no more word processors. How would you write?

I'd just dust this off:
http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g76/shadow_ferret/425046-R1-029-13_013.jpg

You wake up tomorrow and there is no more electricity. How do you write?


Same answer.

LuckyH
01-27-2010, 09:38 PM
Iíve tried voice recognition software and failed, miserably. If I try and write a lot by hand, I get tennis elbow, and when they stick that needle in . . .

Iíve still got the typewriter, but Iím programmed to make a mistake right at the bottom of the page and my correction thingy doesnít work . . .

I would be fucked.

Medievalist
01-27-2010, 10:02 PM
Oh! My! God!

I was just going to ask if anyone else remembers the TRS-80s. :D


I remember the Trash-80, the TI, the Exody Sorceror, and the Apple I and II.

Medievalist
01-27-2010, 10:04 PM
Blood on the skins of my enemies.

You have enemies?

scarletpeaches
01-27-2010, 10:06 PM
I remember the Trash-80, the TI, the Exody Sorceror, and the Apple I and II.I totally upgraded to an Amstrad CPC-464 after that although I envied my cousin's Commodore 64 because it had a colour monitor!

aadams73
01-27-2010, 10:22 PM
You have enemies?

Sure. Anyone who gets between me and a slice of chocolate mud cake is instantly my enemy. That's the fastest way to lose a hand.

DeleyanLee
01-27-2010, 11:07 PM
I remember the Lisa.

All this talk has inspired me to go typewriter hunting. :D

Polenth
01-27-2010, 11:21 PM
I find writing by hand awkward and tiring. That means I spend my time focusing on making the pen move and not on what I write.

It's possible I could learn to dictate stories, and type them up on a typewriter afterwards. That was an option I considered before I learnt to type.

Jamesaritchie
01-27-2010, 11:34 PM
I remember the Lisa.

All this talk has inspired me to go typewriter hunting. :D

Good luck. I'm not sure why it happened, but many typewriters that sold for five bucks a few years ago are now selling for several hundred dollars.

Maybe a BUNCH of writers decided being a Luddite isn't so bad?

Cyia
01-27-2010, 11:34 PM
In high school -- when most people had computers -- I didn't.

What I did have was my great grandmother's old circa 1930-whatever Lois Lane approved newspaper style typewriter. It was heavy. It was slow. It had VERY tall keys... but I still did my papers on it until the ribbons faded so far my teachers started writing notes on top of my assignments about it.

Later, someone got me a typewriter I could actually plug in, but it still wasn't a computer. :cry:

I could go back to that if I had to -- in fact, I got so used to the "clack" sound and the carriage return, I can't stand silent keyboards.

Jamesaritchie
01-27-2010, 11:36 PM
I find writing by hand awkward and tiring. That means I spend my time focusing on making the pen move and not on what I write.

It's possible I could learn to dictate stories, and type them up on a typewriter afterwards. That was an option I considered before I learnt to type.


Writing muscles are a use them or lose them deal. I grew up writing in longhand, and have never gone very long without using those muscles.

Jamesaritchie
01-27-2010, 11:39 PM
I could go back to that if I had to -- in fact, I got so used to the "clack" sound and the carriage return, I can't stand silent keyboards.

When I am forced to use a word processor, I also use a bit of software that makes the keyboard sound like an old typewriter.

I also use Q10 more and more often for short pieces, and it comes with a feature that makes it sound like a typewriter. Plus a real time word count and a global target. Very handy. http://www.baara.com/q10/

DeleyanLee
01-27-2010, 11:40 PM
Good luck. I'm not sure why it happened, but many typewriters than sold for five bucks a few years ago are now selling for several hundred dollars.

Maybe a BUNCH of writers decided being a Luddite isn't so bad?

Craigslist has over 20 of them, locally, all under $50. That's just what I found on the web. Garage/rummage sales will be sprouting up soon, and that's always a good hunting ground. And the main typewriter store/repair shop in town is 2 blocks from where I work, if I get desperate.

Guess it depends on where you live.

jilly61
01-27-2010, 11:49 PM
I'd write with a decent cartridge pen and be eternally grateful for the people who gave up early.

Chris P
01-27-2010, 11:53 PM
I'd write with a decent cartridge pen and be eternally grateful for the people who gave up early.

Hahaha! It sure would cut down the competition, wouldn't it? :)

Jamesaritchie
01-28-2010, 12:05 AM
Craigslist has over 20 of them, locally, all under $50. That's just what I found on the web. Garage/rummage sales will be sprouting up soon, and that's always a good hunting ground. And the main typewriter store/repair shop in town is 2 blocks from where I work, if I get desperate.

Guess it depends on where you live.

I think it's more where you buy them. Collectors and dealers are starting to scarf some up, but I guess the general public hasn't caught this yet.

And the kind you want, of course. The classic manual "writer's choice" typewriters such as the old Underwoods are going for the most.

But our local Goodwill had an IBM Selectric for ten bucks a while back.

bettielee
01-28-2010, 12:06 AM
In all seriousness, my fountain pens would be very happy to have something to do.

And ironically, my very favorite is a purple marlbed barrel pen, with no pedigree, bought for $5 on ebay.

Bubastes
01-28-2010, 12:10 AM
I remember the Trash-80, the TI, the Exody Sorceror, and the Apple I and II.

I remember spending hours writing on an Apple II. Ah, good times.

kuwisdelu
01-28-2010, 12:22 AM
I can't believe there are writers who would give up. Does that mean they're writers with conditions? As long as it's easy, they'll do it?

Although, of course, I have previously said that if certain terms and conditions would make one quit, then...maybe that's for the best.

If they killed off the typewriter, too, I'd arrange letters on a printing press.

If they killed off the printing press, too, I'd invent it.

If they didn't let me, I'd probably switch to writing all my novels in verse.

I'd still write, but I'd do it very differently than I do now.

I can write verse longhand ó it's the only way I can write verse, actually ó but I have difficulty with prose.

aadams73
01-28-2010, 12:37 AM
Writing muscles are a use them or lose them deal. I grew up writing in longhand, and have never gone very long without using those muscles.

Fortunately, like any other muscles, they can be exercised. My handwriting had deteriorated to the point where I could barely read my own shopping lists. So I bought a decent fountain pen, plenty of ink, and I've been doing more and more writing by hand--just as a way to shake ideas loose when necessary. End result? My penmanship is improving markedly.

I'd forgotten how relaxing it can be to let a pen glide across paper...

Elaine Margarett
01-28-2010, 12:57 AM
I can't believe there are writers who would give up. Does that mean they're writers with conditions? As long as it's easy, they'll do it?

Although, of course, I have previously said that if certain terms and conditions would make one quit, then...maybe that's for the best.

Bolding mine...
It seems to me this is a recurring theme with you...wonder why such negativty?

Not that it matters. <shrug>

pink lily
01-28-2010, 01:06 AM
It seems to me this is a recurring theme with you...wonder why such negativty?

Not that it matters. <shrug>
Because people who give up easily were bad writers to begin with? No matter if they had computers, word processors, typewriters or pens?

Elaine Margarett
01-28-2010, 01:17 AM
Because people who give up easily were bad writers to begin with? No matter if they had computers, word processors, typewriters or pens?

Okay, I'll buy that. <g>

Seriously though, I have so much I love to do, I have to say I'd probably do something else, creatively.

I'm a professional photographer. I also enjoy painting, and am very physical. I love a challenge and am always looking for something new. I also have ADD so that probably plays into it. But I'm very driven and goal oriented. Thank God my husband has always supported my various endeavors. Although the last one, wanting to become a competitive endurance rider made him go a little pale.

He likes that I'm currently a writer. It keeps me close to home.

Elaine,
who has lots of chapters to her life

scarletpeaches
01-28-2010, 01:29 AM
Bolding mine...
It seems to me this is a recurring theme with you...wonder why such negativty?

Not that it matters. <shrug>It seems to me that bitching about my posts is a recurring theme with you...wonder why such negativity?

And it obviously matters to you or you wouldn't keep doing it.

thethinker42
01-28-2010, 01:32 AM
Although, of course, I have previously said that if certain terms and conditions would make one quit, then...maybe that's for the best.


It seems to me this is a recurring theme with you...wonder why such negativty?

Not that it matters. <shrug>

Actually, SP's got a point: Writing is hard work. Getting anywhere with it requires some serious dedication. If someone is so easily deterred from it, maybe it really isn't what they want to be doing to begin with. So, if something were to deter a person from writing, maybe it's for the best because then they won't piss away years of work and loads of frustration working at something they don't really want to do after all.

Elaine Margarett
01-28-2010, 01:40 AM
...Writing is hard work. Getting anywhere with it requires some serious dedication...

That's why I love it! The mental aspect of it all. I love to do (and succeed at) the difficult. But if I had to go back to slogging it out on paper ... <shrug> I honestly don't know. Again the whole ADD thingy makes me impatient, I guess. But that doesn't mean I intend on giving up!

I'm too close. <VBG>

Ken
01-28-2010, 01:44 AM
... I'd hire a secretary to dictate to, in between down-time ;-)

pink lily
01-28-2010, 01:45 AM
... I'd hire a secretary to dictate to, in between down-time ;-)
I used to wish I had an Agnes Gooch.

Ken
01-28-2010, 01:54 AM
I used to wish I had an Agnes Gooch.

... the day is still young ;-)
I'd like an Anna Snitkinia.

http://www.virtusens.de/dostojewskij/grafik/zweitefrau_kl.jpg

Polenth
01-28-2010, 01:58 AM
Writing muscles are a use them or lose them deal. I grew up writing in longhand, and have never gone very long without using those muscles.

I grew up writing longhand too. I still draw and write notes, so I've maintained the ability. It doesn't change the fact I find it difficult and awkward. The tiring part is mental tiredness, from focusing so much energy on making the letters the right shape and size.

This doesn't stop me writing something by hand, but it'll always be inferior quality because I'm thinking about the shape of the words instead of what the words mean. If practise was going to change that, it would have changed by now.

Typing evened the odds for me and let me focus on what the words meant. I'm no longer running a race in lead boots, while everyone else has running shoes.

kuwisdelu
01-28-2010, 02:01 AM
... I'd hire a secretary to dictate to, in between down-time ;-)


I used to wish I had an Agnes Gooch.


... the day is still young ;-)
I'd like an Anna Snitkinia.

http://www.virtusens.de/dostojewskij/grafik/zweitefrau_kl.jpg

You can have them.

I'll take Maggie Gyllenhaal.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/143553/maggie-gyllenhaal2%20copy.jpg

Elaine Margarett
01-28-2010, 02:01 AM
... I'd hire a secretary to dictate to, in between down-time ;-)

Now why didn't *I* think of that! Although I bet your downtime activity wouldn't be mine, lol.

Elaine,
whose writing is an excuse to get a maid... As in, "Sorry, dear, I was going to clean but I have a pesky deadline..."

Ken
01-28-2010, 02:23 AM
I'll take Maggie Gyllenhaal.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/143553/maggie-gyllenhaal2%20copy.jpg

... interesting selection, though it would be rather difficult to explain to editors why one's manuscripts have teeth marks on them.

thethinker42
01-28-2010, 03:23 AM
... interesting selection, though it would be rather difficult to explain to editors why one's manuscripts have teeth marks on them.

Could get you bonus points with an erotica publisher, though...

Caitlin Black
01-28-2010, 06:02 AM
Black pen in a notebook.

Although the secretary could be a good idea.

Ken
01-28-2010, 06:59 AM
Could get you bonus points with an erotica publisher, though...

... it might at that.
Samhain here I (chomp, chomp) come!

writeronfire
01-28-2010, 07:30 AM
Well, this is easy.

I would get out my Crayola crayons and pad of paper.

StandJustSo
01-28-2010, 04:14 PM
I would get my electric typewriter out of the closet, dust 'er off, and type away, then let it print out the sheets when I was done. It has a built in memory, enough to print out about 15 pages I believe, if memory serves... I don't need whiteout to make corrections, either, as everything I'm typing scrolls across a little screen. I even have extra ribbons in the drawer next to me.... if they're not completely brittle or dried out, that is. Running out of ribbons would definitely be a problem, but then I could just drag out one of my 'vintage' typewriters and bang away with that, OR just dictate the dang book into my MP3 player, and let someone else type it, hehehe...

Shara
01-28-2010, 04:59 PM
I, too, am old enough to remember a time before word processors.

When I started writing in earnest, in school, I wrote in pencil in the back of my school exercise books. I would start on the back page and work forwards (to leave myself enough room for my school work). Sometimes I would use two or three exercise books, if I was writing a novel and not a story...

That would be my first draft. When I got to the end I would do the second draft on my little plastic manual typewriter, making amendments along the way.

So, I guess if there were no more computers, I'd go back to doing it that way! Although since I'm now used to touch typing on a computer keyboard, it would take a while to get used to how hard I would have to hammer on a manual typewriter...

Shara

JimmyB27
01-28-2010, 05:57 PM
I would use an infinite number of monkeys and an infinite number of typewriters.

Might have to clear out the spare bedroom for somewhere to keep them though.