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Bushdoctor
01-12-2010, 06:51 PM
Fellow rejecties. I just need to know what you do with your old manuscripts.
Do you
-burn them
-keep them in an old drawer or harddrive
-bring them out every so often for old times saje
-keep tinkering with them and hope something will happen

kellion92
01-12-2010, 07:42 PM
I keep on a harddrive, of course. And I had a single draft copy bound as a paperback on Lulu (not for sale) so I could put in on a bookshelf and look at when I'm old, even if it's never published.

Jamesaritchie
01-13-2010, 12:13 AM
When a story sells, I save the old mansucript for posterity's sake. When a story doesn't sell, I keep submitting it until it does sell.

Wordwrestler
01-13-2010, 04:40 AM
They make great scrap paper for the kids. Just be sure to remove the steamy parts.

AnnieColleen
01-13-2010, 05:42 AM
Old manuscripts never die; they just come to THE END.

Sorry. With that thread title, I had to.

I haven't gotten to the point of sending novels out yet, but the short stories I've sent out & gotten back have been recycled. At least in theory -- I'm a huge packrat, so I'm sure I have a few still hanging around somewhere.

Bushdoctor
01-13-2010, 07:39 AM
Thanks for your contributions, keep them coming guys

skippingstone
01-14-2010, 10:53 PM
I put a note on them that says, "Under no circumstances is this to be published before my death!" and hope that in fifty years one of my progeny will take up the cause anew.

Adam
01-15-2010, 12:18 AM
At the moment, I have 3 printed MSs and a few short stories lying about my room. I intend to recycle them at some point, but haven't got around to it. I like having them about the place, even though they're out of date. :)

DeleyanLee
01-15-2010, 12:22 AM
Compost.

Scrap paper for visiting kids.

Scrap paper for emergency puppy house breaking.

Coasters.

Nope, don't keep them once I've shelved them. Did for many years. Ended up with 2 huge boxes weighing about 60 lbs a piece. Decided it wasn't worth schlepping around anymore, so I had a big bonfire (literally) and burned them all. It was very wonderful to get out from under all the dead weight. Now, I don't bother keeping anything that didn't pan out.

Nateskate
01-15-2010, 12:59 AM
I rarely throw things away. I'm not sure why I keep them. Those related to my current WIP I keep. I figure that if I ever need to prove how bad I can write, I can always whip one of these out.

My early drafts are kind of like Tolkien's unfinished tales - difficult to read.

stormie
01-15-2010, 01:15 AM
Old manuscripts never die; they just come to THE END.
^ :ROFL: ^

.

I just keep them stored on my hard drive and a USB. Sometimes I'll use a portion of one of those oldies for a new improved story.

Anyway, no more hardcopy--I hate to see my precious ones collect dust.

.

dawinsor
01-15-2010, 01:19 AM
I store them electronically. I use all the printout for scrap paper to print drafts of my next story. I just have to be careful not to print different drafts of the same story on the back and front of the same sheet of paper. That gets confusing.

PoppysInARow
01-15-2010, 04:57 AM
I use them in Zombie Voodoo ceramonies so they will RISE AGAIN!


....Hardrive 'em.

AlterEgox5
01-22-2010, 04:35 AM
Kept electronically...except for the originals that were handwritten.

speculative
01-25-2010, 11:24 PM
I keep them around in hardcopy format if I ever printed them out, and electronically if they were written post-Apple II era. :) I also have some hand-written works before that time period that are only hardcopy. Although I wanted to scan them, I have never gotten around to it.

Jamesaritchie
01-27-2010, 05:32 AM
You be surprised how many colleges will find a spot for your old manuscripts, once you've had a few novels published. Even early, unpublished manuscripts are then considered a fascinating part of your writing life. So it's not a bad idea to hang on to manuscripts.

nitaworm
01-27-2010, 04:58 PM
I print them out in little book formats, and line the book cabinet with them. It's nice to see the progress of my writing.

Katrina S. Forest
01-29-2010, 04:15 PM
I save them. And then I tell myself that they will be published someday, because of course, when I write a brilliant novel and become famous, everyone will want to read my non-brilliant novel. ^_^

icenine
02-17-2010, 08:13 PM
Fellow rejecties. I just need to know what you do with your old manuscripts.
Do you
-burn them
-keep them in an old drawer or harddrive
-bring them out every so often for old times saje
-keep tinkering with them and hope something will happen

You're assuming that because the story was rejected, it's no good. Not always true.

I'll tell you a little story that may or may not shock you.

I once worked with a writer to co-edit an anthology but I pulled out because I disagreed with the way he wanted to work it. We had over 400 submissions inside of a month. We worked through them dilligently. Or at least I did. I had my favs; he had his. Some of the ones we picked were the same so you would assume that those stories would go to the top of the list. Nope. Because what he wanted to do, and did, was to look up all the writers to find out more about them. He wanted to know where they'd been published, how often, and when. He was being a snob about it. He was rejecting stories that were great because the writers of those stories weren't established. He wanted names, even if the stories by the names were poor. He wanted to show off. We argued over it and I pulled out. The anthology was published. I'm still glad I pulled out.

Shadow_Ferret
02-17-2010, 08:26 PM
I have no old manuscripts, just unsold ones.

mscelina
02-17-2010, 08:33 PM
Every manuscript I write goes through the same submission process--agents, big pubs, independent pubs. So far, everything has been sold on one of those levels. Everything else I have I'm either reworking or it's out on submission--usually reworking. I'm a firm believer that I can bring any of my manuscripts up to some kind of saleable condition, and every manuscript helps me to better my craft.

I didn't always think that way, though. I wrote a novel when I was 17. After sending it out on submission (much more expensive in the eighties, by the way) and it didn't sell, I literally trunked it. It ended up in the same trunk with my prom dress and my graduation cap and gown.

Twenty years later, I pulled it out. I'd just been in my accident and we were poor-- so poor we couldn't afford cable or internet. But, I had my computer. And just for something to keep me occupied, I reworked the story. It ended up getting completely revamped and expanding into four books. Then, somehow, I sold the series.

Everything you write has some kind of benefit to it. Even if a story doesn't sell, keep it around in some form--whether a hard copy or an electronic one. If nothing else, at least it's an idea and ideas are hard to come by. Then, someday, when your technique and knowledge have improved, you can take that trunked idea out of wherever you hid it and apply that newfound knowledge to your original idea.

Never give up on your ideas; improve upon them.

Jamesaritchie
02-17-2010, 08:41 PM
I think the point of this thread is that the only place for an old manuscript is in submission. I've had stories rejected up tp seventeen times by tiny little magazines, and then sell for a thousand dollars or more to large magazines that just started taking fiction, or that I overlooked in teh initial submission process.

If a story is kept in submission, there's always a chance it will sell somewhere. If it's pulled out of submission, it's dead.

Wordwrestler
02-17-2010, 08:54 PM
When I first answered the OP, I took "old manuscripts" to mean the actual piles of paper; not the stories themselves. I keep both paper and electronic copies of my novels. For some I keep several different versions, both electronic and paper.

Ugawa
02-18-2010, 06:28 AM
I keep them on my hard drive. I tried turning my first ever novel into an AU fanfiction so at least it would've had some readers, but while reading it again a few months ago, I realized it was even too bad for fanfiction.

icenine
02-18-2010, 10:20 PM
I think the point of this thread is that the only place for an old manuscript is in submission. I've had stories rejected up tp seventeen times by tiny little magazines, and then sell for a thousand dollars or more to large magazines that just started taking fiction, or that I overlooked in teh initial submission process.

If a story is kept in submission, there's always a chance it will sell somewhere. If it's pulled out of submission, it's dead.

Spot on.

Greenwolf103
02-28-2010, 07:31 PM
I prefer to save the rejects.

One reason why is because I might turn them into something else later. Currently thinking of using material from an essay for a short story that's in infantile stages in my mind. Also, a recently rejected article will be relocated to a new book I'm starting as of...tomorrow.

Another reason is because I might YET find a home for them...SOMEWHERE. There's always new markets opening up and chances are pretty good there will be a market that likes THAT particular piece.

I also save rejects just so I can experiment on, er, I mean tinker with them. I like working with the words, changing things around, flexing my POV muscles. it's something to work with on days the writing isn't going so well. :)

And sometimes, just some of the time, I'll take a look at old stuff and think, Oh, my God! Thank you for rejecting this! It's HORRID! I give it a facelift and it's so much better. Not only have I gotten a smile on my face for catching old mistakes, but this has even earned me a sale or two.

You never know what can happen to a rejected piece later on. Good idea to save 'em, preferably on the hard drive.