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Tepelus
01-09-2010, 05:34 AM
Okay, I've been referring my MC as Romanian throughout the whole story, but after some research, I don't think the term Romanian was used by them in the 15th century. I think they might have called themselves Walachians, but I just don't know. Another term, used by the Slavs and Germans was Vlach, of which Walachia had come from, but would they have called themselves Vlachs? And what of their language, would they call that Vlach, or Walachian or Romanian? It wouldn't make sense to call all Romanians Walachians or their language since Moldavia is Romanian too. My MC does come from Walachia, so I guess I could call him a Walachian, but what of the language? I'm confused, and my research has left me more confused. Perhaps someone here might know something?

mscelina
01-09-2010, 05:54 AM
Well the language of Wallachia was Romanian, so you're good there. There is, I believe, a Wallachian dialect within the language. Just off the top of my head, Walachia and Moldavia (which later united to form Romania in the nineteenth century) shared language, culture etc in much the same way that Germany and Austria do or, to a lesser degree, France and the southern part of Belgium.

Or, as another option you might want to refer to the two countries as the Danubian Prinicipalities, which is also how they were known especially in political circles.

Tepelus
01-10-2010, 08:49 AM
Thanks, mscelina. Unless I find something that says otherwise, I'm going to stick with my characters referring to the Romanian language as Romanian, but I may go ahead and have my MC refer to himself as a Walachian instead of as Romanian, since that is where he was born and grew up.

PeterL
01-10-2010, 06:27 PM
They might have referred to themselves by a local term. There are peoples other than the Romanian speakers in that country: many Magyars, Pechenegs Slavs, etc.

JoshEllingson
01-11-2010, 04:50 PM
First off, there are four provinces in Romania, Transylvania, Wallachia, Dacia, and Moldavia. Historically, Transylvania has been Hungarian more than it has been Romanian. Second, Peter, Magyar is the Hungarians.

if you are going to have a character be from Romania, befor the 15th century, your best bet is to identify him by the province that he hails from, or by race.

Tepelus
01-12-2010, 12:48 AM
Thanks everybody.

VioletK
03-30-2013, 08:02 PM
Well the language of Wallachia was Romanian, so you're good there. There is, I believe, a Wallachian dialect within the language. Just off the top of my head, Walachia and Moldavia (which later united to form Romania in the nineteenth century) shared language, culture etc in much the same way that Germany and Austria do or, to a lesser degree, France and the southern part of Belgium.

Or, as another option you might want to refer to the two countries as the Danubian Prinicipalities, which is also how they were known especially in political circles.

If you refer to their language in the 15th century as "Romanian" you are basically making that up. Which is totally fine if your taking charge of the "fiction" in "historical fiction". But to be more accurate, a detailed research on the dialects of the time is certainly in order. That said, there is a plethora of information out there right down to how the intonations of Transylvanian dialect differed slightly from Wallachain, etc. You just have to get motivated to do said research :)

Tepelus
03-30-2013, 08:32 PM
This is an old thread, but I did end up calling the language Vlach and have my character refer to himself as Walachian, since the term Romanian was used much later than the 15th century.

VioletK
04-01-2013, 04:55 AM
This is an old thread, but I did end up calling the language Vlach and have my character refer to himself as Walachian, since the term Romanian was used much later than the 15th century.

Thats great, sorry for the late reply, I just couldnt help myself!

Tepelus
04-01-2013, 05:20 AM
Thats great, sorry for the late reply, I just couldnt help myself!

`Tis quite all right. ;)

shayla.mist
04-13-2013, 07:50 PM
Hi Tepelus. I suck at history but you should ask our romanian thread. Maybe the girls are better than me.
What Josh Ellingson said is somewhat correct. Romania took the name of Romania in 1918 when we got united. In the time of Ancient Rome, it was called Dacia. After the Romans left Dacia, it split up into tiny "countries" that, with time, formed alliances or conquered each other. Thus there was Moldavia, Transilvania, Tara Romaneasca (which translated would literally mean the Romanian country, but it was only a region) better known in English as Wallachia , Munternia, Dobrogea, Banat, Oltenia, Crisana, Maramures and Bucovina, also Basarabia which we lost to the Russians. Some of these regions formed later than the time of Vlad Tepes. As ruler of Wallachia, he still spoke romanian though (known as wallachian back then), albeit a more ancient, primitive language. A lot of it was preserved and passed on into the modern language so, technically it isn't wrong to call it Romanian. As for the written language, I believed they used the Cyrillic alphabet back then.
Try to research some documents from that time and see how it looks in comparison to the modern writing.

Tepelus
04-14-2013, 06:03 AM
The oldest known document written in Romanian was in Cyrillic, dating to 1521 (just looked it up, though I knew of it three years ago when I first started researching this topic) by a Wallachian boyar named Neacsu. It is possible the language could have been in written form during Vlad's time, but I do know Latin was the primary language used in correspondence. The language may have still been strictly verbal during his time, or in its infancy of becoming written and 1521 is as far back in documentation that's been found, unless there is information out there that says differently from what I learned a few years back.

shayla.mist
04-14-2013, 12:25 PM
nah, I'm pretty sure you did a thorough research. I have history books in my attic. Maybe I should dig them up and see what they say.I seriously doubt Tepes wrote in Latin. And they most likely didn't speak it either. What about the Ottoman language?
Seriously, I need to review my history knowledge.