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View Full Version : You wanna know what really pisses me off?



OneTeam OneDream
08-01-2005, 11:47 PM
Why an agent would list on their site that they accept email queries, and are currently seeking new clients, but would delete a query without even opening it. (It is amazing the things you can track with AOL.)

I just don't get that kind of thing. I know agents think they are "high and mighty", but how in the world could they explain something like this?

To make matters worse, not only did they do it once ,they did it twice!

Jamesaritchie
08-02-2005, 12:18 AM
Why an agent would list on their site that they accept email queries, and are currently seeking new clients, but would delete a query without even opening it. (It is amazing the things you can track with AOL.)

I just don't get that kind of thing. I know agents think they are "high and mighty", but how in the world could they explain something like this?

To make matters worse, not only did they do it once ,they did it twice!

One problem with e-mail queries is that they can be deleted so easily, and often by accident. Spam filters can also delete them. So can agents and editors if the subject line is wrong. So can agents and editors if you send it "return receit requested," and they don't want them sent this way, which many do not. I delete everything that hits my inbox, if it asks for a return receipt.

OneTeam OneDream
08-02-2005, 12:25 AM
One problem with e-mail queries is that they can be deleted so easily, and often by accident. Spam filters can also delete them. So can agents and editors if the subject line is wrong. So can agents and editors if you send it "return receit requested," and they don't want them sent this way, which many do not. I delete everything that hits my inbox, if it asks for a return receipt.

Yeah, I don't do it that way, AOL does it automatically.

PattiTheWicked
08-02-2005, 08:52 AM
Yeah, I don't do it that way, AOL does it automatically.

That's weird, what version of AOHell are you using? I've got 9.0, and I have to check a box if I want to request a return receipt when I send email. Do you need to tweak your default mail settings maybe?

RainBrain
08-02-2005, 09:06 AM
the thing about this writing thing has had me depressed. i dont have a problem writing the book but the drama that comes after that makes me wanna give up sometimes. all this agent this, query that, proposal yadi ya. i mean, damn. lol.

but seriously, my approach to this whole thing is purely nonchalant now. that mentality keeps you from going insane.

brinkett
08-02-2005, 05:19 PM
Yeah, I don't do it that way, AOL does it automatically.
No it doesn't. My mother uses AOL and I've never been asked to send a return receipt when receiving her email.

OneTeam OneDream
08-02-2005, 05:26 PM
No it doesn't. My mother uses AOL and I've never been asked to send a return receipt when receiving her email.



No No No, it tracks it automatically. I'm not talking about return reciepts, you just check the status, it is something automatically there in your mailbox. Has been for years. But it only works for agents with an aol address. That's the crappy part.

Jamesaritchie
08-03-2005, 09:17 PM
No No No, it tracks it automatically. I'm not talking about return reciepts, you just check the status, it is something automatically there in your mailbox. Has been for years. But it only works for agents with an aol address. That's the crappy part.

Many people don't like the tracking part of AOL, either. I sure don't. I left AOL years ago, but I never let anything come into my incbox that had AOL tracing on it. I can't remember now how it was done, but you can disable this on the receiving end so that no one knows the status of their e-mail.

This means you can't automatically assume that your message hasn't been read just because the tracking says it hasn't.

eldragon
08-03-2005, 10:54 PM
the thing about this writing thing has had me depressed. i dont have a problem writing the book but the drama that comes after that makes me wanna give up sometimes. all this agent this, query that, proposal yadi ya. i mean, damn. lol.

I agree. I almost get depressed when an agent asked me for a copy of my manuscript. I have been burned too many times (the worst was when an agent asked me for 2 copies, last April ......then, after acknowledging receipt and saying the book was good, but needed work ............dropped off the face of the earth. That pleasure cost me about $30 in postage and copies.)


My book is over 300 pages. Getting copies is expensive. Mailing it can be expensive, too. PLus, you have to make sure everything is "just so."


Yesterday - I got a form rejection from an agent. How nice!

Another $10...........down the drain. I could've had a V8.

Torgo
08-04-2005, 03:52 AM
I have my read receipts on all the time, and they don't always tell the truth, especially if the recipient is using a Mac. Most times someone reads one of my emails on a Mac I get a 'deleted without being read' receipt back; so don't get too annoyed about it, it's more than likely your submission was read.

triceretops
08-06-2005, 08:53 AM
Oh yeah? How's this one grab you for email non-openers?

45 submissions

21 answers.

These are ALL agent non-responders and deleters. Do you know where my four acceptances came from? Small publishing houses, who were just as polite and interesting as they could be.

I cannot stand nor tolerate agents who claim that they eagarly accept email queries, and yet blink me off their screens without so much as a "howdy do--go fugg yourself."

I would much more prefer the negative so I can track my submissions to (supposedly) open sources. That way I would know whether this fool was alive and really in business.

Sorry, feel the pain mucho on this topic.

Tri

Jamesaritchie
08-06-2005, 09:12 AM
I cannot stand nor tolerate agents who claim that they eagarly accept email queries, and yet blink me off their screens without so much as a "howdy do--go fugg yourself."



Tri

Well, you know that when agents or editors say they eagarly accept e-mail queries, most of them really mean they eagarly accept ones they like. It's just par for the course, and it's really they same thing as magazines that don't respond to submissions unless they accept them.

In either case, you just wait a reasonable amount of time and then scratch that one off as a rejection.

OneTeam OneDream
08-06-2005, 09:19 AM
Many people don't like the tracking part of AOL, either. I sure don't. I left AOL years ago, but I never let anything come into my incbox that had AOL tracing on it. I can't remember now how it was done, but you can disable this on the receiving end so that no one knows the status of their e-mail. .

I've never heard of being able to disable it. Of course, it only matters if you have aol, that is the only way it tracks it automatically.


[/QUOTE]
This means you can't automatically assume that your message hasn't been read just because the tracking says it hasn't.[/QUOTE]


Sure I can....I can assume anything....I just might not be right.

GonnaBeFamous
08-06-2005, 10:07 AM
I agree. I almost get depressed when an agent asked me for a copy of my manuscript. I have been burned too many times (the worst was when an agent asked me for 2 copies, last April ......then, after acknowledging receipt and saying the book was good, but needed work ............dropped off the face of the earth. That pleasure cost me about $30 in postage and copies.)


My book is over 300 pages. Getting copies is expensive. Mailing it can be expensive, too. PLus, you have to make sure everything is "just so."


Yesterday - I got a form rejection from an agent. How nice!

Another $10...........down the drain. I could've had a V8.

Any way you can get them to mail it back with postage paid for them?

triceretops
08-06-2005, 10:50 AM
My book is over 300 pages. Getting copies is expensive. Mailing it can be expensive, too. PLus, you have to make sure everything is "just so."

I'll triple that notion, Eldragon. I fret most when they want wholes--I'm living on borrowed money and time.

Tri

brinkett
08-06-2005, 04:39 PM
In either case, you just wait a reasonable amount of time and then scratch that one off as a rejection.
Or send a snail mail query. Agents will tell you that for whatever reason, email queries can be snagged by their spam filters. So if you query by email and don't receive a response, don't assume they read it and didn't bother to answer. If they accept snail mail queries, try snail mail.

OneTeam OneDream
08-06-2005, 06:10 PM
I'm suprised no one has answered this thread with "No, not really"

Sassenach
08-09-2005, 08:13 PM
Any way you can get them to mail it back with postage paid for them?

No. Sending out partials, ms, etc. is the 'cost of doing business' if one is trying to get an agent.

Jaben
08-18-2005, 04:54 AM
new to board but following conversation and feel your pain. i don't send my ms or query letters to any publisher or agent that doesn't accept them electronically. it's not even a matter of money - although that's part of it - but also of time. eventually, a savvy publisher or site will come along that will recognize this problem and make a lot of money off it. until then...i wait.

- J

RainBrain
08-19-2005, 08:38 PM
new to board but following conversation and feel your pain. i don't send my ms or query letters to any publisher or agent that doesn't accept them electronically. it's not even a matter of money - although that's part of it - but also of time. eventually, a savvy publisher or site will come along that will recognize this problem and make a lot of money off it. until then...i wait.

- J

i thought about this too. i mean, wouldn't it make more sense if people can just send the query via email and if the agent or publisher likes they reques it via snail mail. i sure wouldn't mind.

triceretops
08-19-2005, 09:04 PM
I'm for saving trees and my wallet. I'm sick and tired of blowing the entire amount on a 400-page disposable manuscript that ends up in the trash outside a New York alley. I deal exclusively with email queries, partials and fulls for right now. The only reasons agents and editors keep insisting on snail mail is because their fear of viruses (the most often quoted), and the portability of the written word on paper (which means they can read it in the hottub or their limo). Correct me, but can't attachments be scanned (somehow) before opening? I'm an old scribe but brand new to the internet. How can this problem of Attachment fear be quelled?

From 1986 to 1991 I suffered over 350 various rejections of every kind, and you wouldn't, couldn't, shouldn't believe the amount of money I spent on copy machines, postage, ink cartridges, paper, envelopes and packing boxes. It was in the several thousands of dollars. I only made it back and then some with my first book sale.

Tri

RainBrain
08-19-2005, 10:07 PM
I'm for saving trees and my wallet. I'm sick and tired of blowing the entire amount on a 400-page disposable manuscript that ends up in the trash outside a New York alley. I deal exclusively with email queries, partials and fulls for right now. The only reasons agents and editors keep insisting on snail mail is because their fear of viruses (the most often quoted), and the portability of the written word on paper (which means they can read it in the hottub or their limo). Correct me, but can't attachments be scanned (somehow) before opening? I'm an old scribe but brand new to the internet. How can this problem of Attachment fear be quelled?

From 1986 to 1991 I suffered over 350 various rejections of every kind, and you wouldn't, couldn't, shouldn't believe the amount of money I spent on copy machines, postage, ink cartridges, paper, envelopes and packing boxes. It was in the several thousands of dollars. I only made it back and then some with my first book sale.

Tri

WOW. thousands on mails? thats waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay tooooo much. lol.

Greenwolf103
08-19-2005, 11:10 PM
Jaben, welcome to the AW Cooler. Do stay a while and post more often. :)

OneTeam, I am sorry you're having this kind of trouble. Maybe you can try sending it from a non-AOL email addy? I have heard of some people who won't open email from AOL addresses. It's worth a shot, at least. But if that fails, I think you should look elsewhere. If they are going to be THAT indifferent based on a person's email address, I don't think things will get much better down the road. Good luck!

OneTeam OneDream
08-20-2005, 09:33 AM
Jaben, welcome to the AW Cooler. Do stay a while and post more often. :)

OneTeam, I am sorry you're having this kind of trouble. Maybe you can try sending it from a non-AOL email addy? I have heard of some people who won't open email from AOL addresses. It's worth a shot, at least. But if that fails, I think you should look elsewhere. If they are going to be THAT indifferent based on a person's email address, I don't think things will get much better down the road. Good luck!


Yeah, but these people HAVE AOL ADDRESSES! So my email address wouldn't be the problem. I can't track anyone that doesn't have AOL, I'm just talking about the folks that actually do have aol.

daoine
08-20-2005, 12:20 PM
Or send a snail mail query. Agents will tell you that for whatever reason, email queries can be snagged by their spam filters. So if you query by email and don't receive a response, don't assume they read it and didn't bother to answer. If they accept snail mail queries, try snail mail.

Pulling my hair out here too. Decided earlier this year (after a year of snail mail submissions) to try an agent who stated that he accepted queries by email. Long story short, it took months of follow up emails before he responded with something like "sorry it took so long - not interested". So I went back to trusty old snail mail... only to wait another several months with no response. I emailed (twice) to query it, and finally discovered that their rejection to me got lost in the damn post. So now I'm back to trying email, because like everyone else, I just cannot afford the postage anymore - my submissions have to go overseas. With return costs that's the equivalent of a week's groceries in one shot. I'm feeling very hungry at the moment. :(

brinkett
08-20-2005, 04:12 PM
I've found that you're much more likely to get a response through snail mail than through email. On the other hand, I find that when you query by email, you're much more likely to receive a response from the agent (rather than an assistant) and receive it faster. So there are advantages/disadvantages to both. Having said that, next time I do a round of queries, I'm giving preference to agents/publishers who accept email queries. The expense does add up, especially when they want the first three chapters. I'm not in the US, but all my queries go to the US, so it's not cheap to send a package containing three chapters. Since they all claim they can make a decision after reading a page or two, I think they should only ask for the first 2-3 pages (as some agents do) if they want a writing sample with the query.

There are a handful of agents I'm interested in querying that specifically say they don't want email queries and I'll follow their guidelines. Everyone else is getting email.