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Unimportant
01-02-2010, 11:55 PM
From what I can find:

Storm Moon Press is brand new and is putting together its first titles for 2010 release. Website here: http://stormmoonpress.com (http://stormmoonpress.com/submissions.aspx)

Its owner/editor, S. L. Armstrong, has self published a few gay-male-erotica stories (http://slarmstrong.net/fiction.aspx), and has been pretty vocal about the evils (http://slarmstrong.wordpress.com/2009/11/28/traditional-publishing-self-publishing-and-vanity-presses-my-take-on-things/), real and imaginary, associated with commercial publishing such as agents/editors controlling what gets published ("tons of good books languish in slush piles and rejection bins because they arenít part of the current hot trend"), authors making little money on their works ("the publisher, on the other hand, is netting 10-15 times as much as the author"), and the snobbery inherent in the industry ("the sense of elitism that the publishers manage to foster").

So she has started up Storm Moon Press to publish not only her own works but also those of outside authors, (which, um, makes SMP a commercial publisher, right?). They're open to erotic romance submissions featuring gay, lesbian, menage, and poly in all genres. Authors will receive 25% on net for print and 40% on net for e-book, which is pretty much in line with most small presses (AFAIK). They'll release titles in both electronic and print form, using the POD model (LSI) for the latter.

So far, it looks to me like most start up micro presses -- a self publisher expanding a bit within his/her niche genre, using POD, paying standard royalty rates, becoming the editor as well as the publisher, etc. Except for this bit:


Accepted submissions will be offered a $1,000 advance against royalties. 25% of the advance will be paid upon signing of the contract, 50% given upon publication, and the remaining 25% will be given upon the author earning out the initial 75% of their advance.And here's where I wave my hand and say "Veinglory? Is this for real?"

How likely is it that a new startup micropress selling gay erotic romance is going to sell enough copies to net the author $1000 per title?

Marian Perera
01-03-2010, 12:09 AM
Their website goes on to say,


We offer a $1,000 advance, though it is not paid in one lump sum. 25% is issued upon signing of the contract, 50% is issued upon publication, and the remaining 25% is issued once the initial 75% of the advance has earned out through sales.

Why did we choose to do this? Because we aren't able to devote a significant marketing budget to every book we publish. It is up to the author to truly sell their book to their audience, and if they choose not to do that, we do not feel obligated to put forth further investment into that work. If the author can show their commitment to marketing by earning out our initial investment in them, then we have no problem offering that further advance compensation. Yes, we believe the works we acquire will sell, but we are also a small press with limited funds, and this is how we have chosen to initially handle our advance offers.

Still, isn't that $750 per author, more or less up front?

Unimportant
01-03-2010, 12:37 AM
It is, Queen. Which is a fair amount of money to fork out per title when the likely income from those titles is, well, not a heck of a lot.

I'm not sure what they mean by "net" -- is it "money received from bookseller" or is it "cover price minus bookseller's discount minus printing costs minus shipping costs". I'm also not sure why, if they're not putting any money into the book, they're entitled to 75% of the profits, especially since the owner is so adamant that the author rather than the evil greedy publisher ought to get the majority of the profits.

kaitie
01-03-2010, 07:28 AM
Taking royalties on net is a really bad idea. Essentially it means the amount it sold for minus all expenses. It's one of those little tricks publishers use to pay unsuspecting authors less. So the amount you get would be probably significantly less than 25% of the cover price. As I understand it, anyway.

veinglory
01-03-2010, 07:52 AM
Given the stated small budget I would worry that this press has unrealistic sales expectations. Most start-ups would not be easily able to pay $1000 per title in royalties within two years. In fact many respectable established epublishers would have trouble doing that. I wish them luck but it doesn't look like a recipe for a stable epress to me.

kaitie
01-03-2010, 08:46 AM
That stood out to me as well, but mostly because it says on the site that authors would be responsible for all marketing. Isn't it right that if there is no marketing done then books don't typically sell as well? Does it have their distribution in there anywhere? I didn't see it.

StormMoonPress
01-28-2010, 06:41 AM
Storm Moon Press has now changed the way we pay out royalties. We have also updated our advance offers. Our distribution list is now included in our FAQs page.

Since these topics were of interest in this post, I figured I would post up here that changes have been made in an effort to better the press. Please visit our official website to stay abreast of the updates and news.

If anyone has any questions, feel free to send us an e-mail, and we'll happily answer!

http://www.stormmoonpress.com/

~K. Piet
On behalf of Storm Moon Press

Momento Mori
01-28-2010, 08:41 PM
Hi, K Piet, and welcome to AW! Many thanks for stopping to let us know about the change to your terms, which is v. encouraging.

There remain a few points of concern though on your website, which I hope you will be willing to address:


Storm Moon Press Website:
Royalties on print books will be 25% of cover price on direct sales through Storm Moon Press' e-store, and 25% of cover price minus distribution costs for sales through third party vendors like Amazon.com, paid quarterly.

Royalties on e-books will be 40% of cover price on direct sales through Storm Moon Press' e-store, and 40% of cover price minus distribution costs for sales through third party vendors, paid quarterly.

You're still paying royalties on net for print and electronic copies sold through third parties, when your distribution costs should be covered by your cover price. In practice, it's going to be very difficult for an author to tell what your distribution costs are going to be, making it difficult to ascertain potential royalty income. Given that you are retaining control over the cover price, it shouldn't be difficult to factor any distribution costs within the same.


Storm Moon Press Website:
We ask for first English language publication rights in both electronic and print.

Are you taking US rights or worldwide rights?


Storm Moon Press Website:
We seek exclusive electronic rights for two (2) years and print rights for three (3) years for novels

I'd be worried that these time frames are insufficient to enable a writer to build up a readership for their work.


Storm Moon Press Website:
we do not accept returns of either print material or e-books.

E-books being non-returnable I can understand, but not making printed material returnable will seriously impede any chance you have of negotiating an instore placement for your books in the future (assuming this is something you are contemplating in the long term, as I note you are open about your books being available to order at stores rather than being placed in them).

MM

veinglory
01-28-2010, 08:51 PM
You're still paying royalties on net for print and electronic copies sold through third parties, when your distribution costs should be covered by your cover price.

In my opinion this objection does not really apply to small press ebooks. It is fairly standard to either take a lower royalty, or a royalty after vendor fees are deducted, when speaking of third party sales of ebooks and not a problem so long as the terms are clear like this. Small press ebooks pay a rather high royalty (30-50% not the large presses 8-10%) and don't leave the same room to accommodate 50% vendor market-up. Also a short term of contract is only a problem is the contract is not easily renewable by digital contract. IMHO these terms are quite standard when comparing oranges to oranges.

Momento Mori
01-28-2010, 09:09 PM
veinglory:
It is fairly standard to either take a lower royalty, or a royalty after vendor fees are deducted, when speaking of third party sales of ebooks and not a problem so long as the terms are clear like this.

Interesting (in a genuine "learn something new every day" way and not a sarky way).

So in that situation, how do you determine what those distribution costs are? Is it accounted for in the royalty statement or is there a definition? My concern would be the potential for abuse assuming a publisher was so inclined (which I'm not suggesting is the case here).

MM

veinglory
01-28-2010, 09:29 PM
The contract should be very clear that only the direct markup is deducted. The royalties statement is then often broken down and specifies direct and third party sales by vendor. Most of us know what Fictionwise, Amazon etc charge so it is fairly easy to check that the amounts are in line with that. Blanket net is a bane of epublishing, but deduction of vendor mark-up only is okay with me in most cases.

Interestingly Ellora's Cave took the tack of just doubling the price via vendors. Amazon seems to just double the price (and I thought their terms of use required publishers not to undercut?), AllRomanceEbooks is eating most of the difference.

StormMoonPress
08-13-2010, 12:26 AM
My most sincere apologies for the insane tardiness of this reply! I assure you it was not a conscious avoidance of the topics and concerns addressed by you both (Momento Mori & Veinglory).

On the comments of royalty structure, we stick by our current structure, which Momento Mori quoted in his comment and can be found on the Storm Moon Press Website (http://www.stormmoonpress.com) under the Submissions tab.

The first English language publication rights for which we ask are the worldwide rights, not just US rights.

We focus primarily on online promotion and feel that our no-return policy for print and e-books protects both us as the publisher and the interests of our contracted authors.

All terms and conditions of the contract, including financial details, are thoroughly discussed and negotiated with our authors before anyone puts ink to paper. We are not at liberty to discuss such matters outside of an author-publisher relationship. If you are interested in submitting to us, but have specific questions before doing so, email us privately and we will do our best to answer. Otherwise, our contracts and terms are just as confidential as they would be to any other publisher.

Again, if anyone has any specific questions, feel free to send us an e-mail, and we'll happily answer!

~K. Piet
On behalf of Storm Moon Press

StormMoonPress
05-07-2012, 12:46 AM
Hello, everyone!

I just thought I would post up here again to let everyone know that Storm Moon Press is now just about two and a half years old, so we're more established now. Our submission guidelines are all up on our website. Our website (http://www.stormmoonpress.com/) has been newly redesigned and relaunched as well, so we've streamlined our look and made it easy for readers and authors to search through our inventory by length or by category (i.e. gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans*).

We have worked with over two dozen authors so far, and we still have several open line calls as well as anthologies that we would love to put out. All those guidelines and such can be found on our website, so if anyone has any questions, they can look there. If they still have questions, please feel free to contact us at editor AT stormmoonpress DOT com. We're always happy to clarify if there's any confusion!

~K. Piet

Marketing Director - Storm Moon Press

Fallen
05-08-2012, 08:51 PM
Thank you for letting everyone here know, K.P.

michael_b
05-09-2012, 11:19 PM
Just dropped by their website. They've got some great looking covers.

StormMoonPress
05-10-2012, 12:45 AM
You're very welcome, Fallen! If anyone has any questions, we're always happy to answer them. ^_^

@Michael_b: Thank you so much! We really love working with our cover artists. Nathie (http://www.creationwarrior.net/) has done the majority of our covers so far, but we're also working with a few other digital painting artists as well as a photo-manipulation cover artist for our newer titles. We really love the cover art aspect of the publishing process, so we take it very seriously and hope that our authors feel involved in the process of creating art to suit each of their releases through us.

Thanks for the comments!
~K. Piet

LaylahHunter
08-23-2012, 12:55 AM
I published a story in an anthology with Storm Moon recently, and there's a bit in the contract I signed that I wish I'd asked questions about before signing. (I was flush in the "oh my gosh I'm going to be published!" phase, as you do, and didn't want to rock the boat by "being difficult" about terms.) The thing that has me fretting is this bit:

All rights to the original Work as submitted will revert to the Author without prejudice upon expiration of this contract. Should the Author wish to acquire rights to the final edited version, he or she agrees to compensate the assigned editor in the amount of one hundred dollars ($100). In consideration of this payment, the editor agrees to release any and all further claim to compensation for the finished Work.In my specific case I don't expect it to matter; even if I did re-release this story after the rights revert, I think I would do so after my own rewrites rather than using the final anthology version. But that contract provision seems like something other authors might want to know about ahead of time, and it isn't mentioned in the public-facing stuff on their website about contract terms.

veinglory
08-23-2012, 01:06 AM
Most publishers are silent on the matter leaving the wise author to assume they should not use the publishers edits upon reversion any more than they would use their cover art. Others give their blessing to take the edits and use them after the contract ends. Having a standard fee for the use of edits is unusual, in my experience, but I am not sure if I see it as terribly problematic.

Unimportant
08-23-2012, 01:06 AM
Thanks for flagging that, Laylah. Because, yes, many authors (including myself) would not sign a contract unless that was struck out.

IMO, it's a bullshit clause. The author owns the copyright to the work, whether edited or not. The publisher cannot claim to own any rights to any version unless the author signs over copyright. When the contract expires, all versions of it belong to the author.

LaylahHunter
08-23-2012, 01:13 AM
The publisher cannot claim to own any rights to any version unless the author signs over copyright. When the contract expires, all versions of it belong to the author.
That's extremely reassuring to hear! One of my co-contributors has been worrying a lot about whether she would need to prove any future publication of the story didn't include the SMP edits (you can tell we're all new at this, can't you?), so I will point her toward this discussion.

Unimportant
08-23-2012, 01:52 AM
I reckon the publisher would have a very hard time proving ownership in court, unless the publisher/editor have themselves substantially rewritten the work. In my experience, the editors suggest changes (ranging from 'get rid of this whole chapter, it's boring as hell' to 'cat is spelt with a c, not a k, you illiterate moron') but in the end it's up to the author to make the revisions or accept the spelling changes.

If suggestions = ownership, I'd own half the queries in Share Your Work :D

StormMoonPress
08-23-2012, 10:50 AM
Hello again, Laylah!

Firstly, we want to be very open here in saying that while not every aspect of our contracts is spelled out explicitly on the website, what is stated explicitly is that all terms of the contracts that we offer are negotiable. This contract term is certainly included!

We have negotiated this term of the contract in several ways in the past, should authors voice their objections or uncertainty. We are always open to explaining why the terms are in place. Since this has come up a couple times, we will definitely be revisiting our contracts and rewording them so they will hopefully be clearer for authors who prospectively publish with us in the future.

The way we define 'final edited work' in this clause of the contract is not your submitted Word document with all of your and the editor's track changes accepted. That is still most certainly the manuscript, and that is your work. It has always been your work. On that point, we agree with 'Unimportant' above. For us, the 'final edited work' refers to the typeset and formatted files that we then distribute for sale. Those files include the production we have gone through with the cover art, typesetting, and formatting. Since we are paying to produce the final files (the actual PDF, LIT, ePub, and Mobi files in addition to the versions that then get sent to the printers for your print books), we own the rights to those master files. Ownership of the master files doesn't negate that the intellectual property and the copyright of the writing itself belongs to you as the author.

We understand this can be a little confusing to those who are new to publishing. The best way I can think to illustrate this in another profession is to compare it to the music industry. Bear with me here. I hope this helps you understand what we're talking about.

If you're a musician and you go into a production studio, you make what's called a 'master tape'. All the copies that are distributed are made from that master tape, and the production studio will keep that master tape. When artists decide to go indie (which, in this case is much like finishing out the contract with the publishing company and then self-publishing), they have to go to their original studio and purchase back their master tapes, which they can then sell out to another label or then have to pay to produce themselves. In the music industry, the big labels very rarely actually part with those master tapes. They make it difficult to purchase them back so you can do your own thing.

Here with publishing, Storm Moon Press is all for making it reasonable for you to buy those finished files so it will be easier for you to self-publish the work at the end of your contract if you wish. At the same time, you will then be making money off of the work we put into those files (cover art, typesetting, and formatting), and you didn't have to put out the extra financial commitment to redo the work we already did as the publishing company. In exchange for that, we feel it's reasonable to ask for a predetermined buy-out for the master files to cover the production costs that you will then not have to pay to someone else if you self-publish the work in the future.

The purpose of the clause in the contract is truly protection for the author, since it's pre-negotiated. You don't want to go to a publisher when you rights are about to revert, and ask after getting the finished files only to be price-gauged. At that point, a publisher could look down their nose and say, "You want it, then you'll have to pay us double what we might normally offer!" That isn't how we operate, and that isn't how we want any press to treat their authors. We set the buy-out cost based on the length of the work and, therefore, on the costs of producing those master files. Cover art might be more expensive, and the typesetting and formatting takes longer for the longer books. Taking all that into account, we set the price so you have it in writing upon signing the contract with us. It's there for complete transparency's sake.

In the end, we apologize if there was any confusion, and we encourage authors, both prospective and current, to bring up any of their uncertainties with us via e-mail at editor@stormmoonpress.com.

We hope this has helped clear up the term in our contract! We're always here to serve our authors!

~K. Piet

Marketing Director
Storm Moon Press, LLC
http://www.stormmoonpress.com/

veinglory
08-23-2012, 06:06 PM
So would those files include the cover art?

LaylahHunter
08-23-2012, 06:53 PM
KP,

Thank you for explaining! I'm glad you're looking into revising the language. Since the term "final edited work" isn't defined in the contract, and the term itself refers to editing rather than typesetting and format conversion, it isn't terribly clear for authors what you intend (nor, I think, would it be clear to a hypothetical court—bear with me here, legal publishing is my day job, so I see a lot of the fussy minutiae of defining terms and closing loopholes). For everyone's protection, not just the author's, it's probably a good move to define terms on which payment hinges.

It's true that I probably should have queried in advance; I did say that in my first post. To be honest, though, I wasn't sure if it would result in a change in contract terms—I had already queried SL Armstrong about the vagueness of the payment terms in the contract (which stated only the generic range of possible payment for anthology pieces, as she says is standard for SMP's contracts), and while she quoted me a smaller range of numbers, she didn't offer to amend the contract to reflect this. So I came to the conclusion that the contract was pretty much offered as-is, and I signed.

Again, I should have been more aggressive about this! It's been a learning experience, the whole process of working with the anthology. Thank you for that opportunity. :)

StormMoonPress
08-23-2012, 09:33 PM
@Veinglory - In Laylah's contract in particular, no cover art is being transferred (since the cover art for the anthology as a whole is shared over several stories by various authors), so that is not included in the clause, but authors who receive single title releases with distinctive cover art are given the opportunity to buy their cover at a reduced rate. That fee differs per cover due to different covers costing different amounts for us. With short stories that are part of our anthologies, they get single releases a year after the anthology's publication. The master files for her story would be those files for the single publication, not including cover art.

For longer works that we publish, especially those in which the cover art is more expensive, we give the option within the contract for the author to buy the master files (without the cover art) or to simply buy the rights to the cover art itself without taking the master files. This allows for the author to walk away with either, neither, or both at the time the rights revert at the end of the contract term. In those contracts, the two are listed separately. Two different fees for two different products they would be buying from the press, as it were. If they want both with the cover art integrated into the files, we arrange for that. If they want just one, but not the other, that option is there for them, which is perfect for those who want to rework the piece or recover it themselves later on.

---

@Laylah - We will most certainly look into revising the language for clarification. We're always open to contract negotiation as well, so we certainly don't want authors to feel intimidated into silence.

These are all parts of the contract that are very open to change and negotiation. Some have negotiated to forgo the fees in exchange for extending the length of the contract, which is then written into the contract for them. Others have expressed interest in acquiring the cover art alone. Some have had the clause completely stricken. Ultimately, we want the author to be happy with the terms of the contract, so there is definitely space for negotiation with Storm Moon Press.

Thank you for your comments!

~K. Piet

Marketing Director
Storm Moon Press, LLC

Fallen
08-23-2012, 10:27 PM
Can I just ask, how do you get to your Author Package? I've been hunting around on site to take a look, and I can't find any link.

michael_b
08-23-2012, 11:11 PM
Can I just ask, how do you get to your Author Package? I've been hunting around on site to take a look, and I can't find any link.

There is a link on their submissions page connected to the words 'author package'. Unfortunately the link is returning a 404 not found error message.

K. Piet, if you're around you might want to have your web admin fix this ASAP. It would also help to have that 'author package' link show up in a different color so people realize it is a link since this fact is not obvious.

Unimportant
08-23-2012, 11:15 PM
Since the term "final edited work" isn't defined in the contract
In all the contracts I've signed, "the work" is defined as the story being contracted. The "final edited work" is the one that gets published after it's gone back and forth through the editing stages. As the publisher noted, this isn't the same as the "final edited work in its published format" -- which includes the layout, fonts, pagination, kerning, margins, and all the other little curliecues that the layout artist adds to make the text easily readable and visually pretty and compatible with various ebook readers or printing facilities.

It's good the publisher has clarified their intent. It'd probably be good if they clarified the wording in the contract, too.

Fallen
08-24-2012, 12:17 AM
There is a link on their submissions page connected to the words 'author package'. Unfortunately the link is returning a 404 not found error message.

K. Piet, if you're around you might want to have your web admin fix this ASAP. It would also help to have that 'author package' link show up in a different color so people realize it is a link since this fact is not obvious.

Thanks, Mike ;)

StormMoonPress
08-24-2012, 01:18 AM
@Fallen & Michael_b - Thank you so much for your interest in the author packet! I've had our Web Admin go in and revise the link that wasn't working properly. We're also going to make the links more visible. Thank you for bringing up the problem! The link is now fixed. You can find it where Michael_b described on the Submissions page, or just follow this direct link: http://www.stormmoonpress.com/new_author_packet_smp_2012.pdf

@Unimportant - You're right on the money as to what the fee in the contract entails. It's that finished product with the proverbial curlicues that the author then has the option of buying from us at the termination of the contract. Those are the master files I was referring to. It is also a completely optional clause, too, just to be clear with everyone reading. Just because the clause is in there doesn't mean the author is obligated to pay us anything upon the reversion of rights. They can take advantage of that set price for the files (and/or cover art, as the case may be) if they so choose. Otherwise, the clause isn't tapped into at the end of the contract period.

We're trying to protect the author there with transparency about the fee. It would be more problematic for a publisher to not include anything on the subject at all, because that then opens up the door for price-gauging if the author brings it up outside the contract after the contract has been signed.

Again, thank you to everyone for your comments and for pointing out the mistake on the website! In the future, if you see anything on the website isn't working properly, please feel free to contact our webmaster directly at webmaster@stormmoonpress.com We'll fix any complications as quickly as possible!

~K. Piet

Marketing Director
Storm Moon Press, LLC

Unimportant
08-24-2012, 01:53 AM
@Unimportant - You're right on the money as to what the fee in the contract entails. It's that finished product with the proverbial curlicues that the author then has the option of buying from us at the termination of the contract. Those are the master files I was referring to. It is also a completely optional clause, too, just to be clear with everyone reading. Just because the clause is in there doesn't mean the author is obligated to pay us anything upon the reversion of rights. They can take advantage of that set price for the files (and/or cover art, as the case may be) if they so choose. Otherwise, the clause isn't tapped into at the end of the contract period.
Thanks -- makes total sense. I can't imagine many authors would kick at that.

Fallen
08-24-2012, 02:16 AM
@Fallen & Michael_b - Thank you so much for your interest in the author packet! I've had our Web Admin go in and revise the link that wasn't working properly. We're also going to make the links more visible. Thank you for bringing up the problem! The link is now fixed. You can find it where Michael_b described on the Submissions page, or just follow this direct link: http://www.stormmoonpress.com/new_author_packet_smp_2012.pdf


~K. Piet

Marketing Director
Storm Moon Press, LLC

Thank you. It's working now!

LaylahHunter
09-06-2012, 06:10 PM
Two of my co-contributors for the Storm Moon anthology I'm in have now been told that the project was "an experiment" to see if the assigned editor could handle solo responsibility, apparently with no oversight, for a book. They were told this in response to their dissatisfaction with the quality and timeliness of the editing they received.

I've gone through and compared my own PDF copy of the book to the approved, edited manuscript I sent back (we weren't provided with typeset proofs), and found formatting and punctuation errors in the PDF that weren't there in the edited manuscript.

The book is apparently still getting good reviews from the book bloggers who've picked it up, but I don't feel very good about it. My work could be (and could have been handled) better.

StormMoonPress
09-06-2012, 10:24 PM
Hello again, Laylah.

I'd like to clear up a few things, since there is obviously concern from three of the four authors in this anthology.

With regards to the All Wrapped Up anthology, it was indeed an experiment for the press. Prior to All Wrapped Up, our anthologies have gone through an in-house acquisitions phase, in which at least one of the owners of the press reviewed all of the submissions for a given anthology. The selection of which stories were to move forward and be offered contracts for the anthology was then made by the owner, not an assigned editor (or even a separate acquisitions editor). As we have grown as a press the last couple years, we have seen several approaches to running anthologies. All Wrapped Up was the first anthology in which we chose to go with the approach of having the concept for the anthology conceived by one outside the core three owners of the press. Elizabeth Hyder pitched the concept for the anthology to us, went through the acquisitions process in selecting the stories, and was in charge of the major editing passes going back and forth with the authors. This format, with limited input from the publisher, is quite common at other presses. When this format is used, the press trusts that the editor in charge of everything will show sound judgment throughout the process and perform adequately as both a developmental and line editor, leaving only minor corrections to be made by the in-house proofreaders.

In the case of All Wrapped Up, the editor, Elizabeth Hyder, did not perform to the level that we expected. We have apologized to the authors for this repeatedly. We have offered additional editing to any dissatisfied author for when their short story is released individually (the offer was declined). We have offered additional promotion to be arranged (this offer was also declined). We have done everything we can to rectify where the editor of this anthology has, admittedly, dropped the ball. As a publisher, this format of anthology has obviously not worked in the way we wished it to. We have since returned to our previous format with more strict control. Lesson learned. However, we could not have known prior to trying it out that this format wouldn't work. Perhaps it does work with a different individual in charge. In any case, we openly apologize to you and the other two authors who have been unhappy with the production of this anthology.

You've brought up that there are differences in your edited files compared to the PDF you were given. The differences between the edited manuscripts that were turned in to us as the owners and the final PDF has to do with the additional passes of proofreading that were done to bring the manuscripts in line with our house style. In the contract, we state that we can correct grammatical and punctuation errors without author approval. This is merely to bring things into our house style (e.g. we as a press use the Oxford comma). Perceived errors may just be part of our house style, which, in some cases, is against various style manuals that authors might have used outside their contracted pieces with us. We're certainly not saying that all errors are only perceived by the authors and should, therefore, be discounted. We're just saying that there might be some that are house style based rather than something that was missed during editing.

We have offered to fix any errors the authors find in their works, since we know that some errors often slip through, no matter how many times the story is read through during the publication process. This involves the authors pointing out the specific places they have found errors so we can address them. The authors who have expressed dissatisfaction have declined to provide us with the specific errors to fix. If you would like to contact us, we are always open to fixing errors or explaining elements of our house style guide that may have changed grammar or punctuation. If the changes you would like to make aren't contrary to our house style, we are more than happy to fix them.

Typeset proof copies were provided to the editor prior to publication, and she expressed to us that she would distribute them to the authors with the understanding that they could point out errors. We told her that you as one of the authors had a week to point out any errors we may have missed, and we would correct them before the final product was made available to the public. If she failed to communicate that, then we must once again apologize for her sub-par conduct. The e-books that are now available did have some typesetting repaired, so if you would like to download your PDF from your bookshelf at the SMP website, that may have the errors corrected in it already.

Again, I will say openly that we as the publisher are very disappointed by the editing that was provided by the assigned editor of the anthology. That is not to say that we are disappointed in the finished product. We enjoyed each of the short stories, find the cover art to be striking, and after seeing the lack of proper editing, put it through extra proofreaders. We are happy with the final product, even though we are just as unhappy with the process as the authors have expressed to us via e-mail.

The editor for All Wrapped Up has since been censured and will not be contracted with again with Storm Moon Press for anthologies. We understand the dissatisfaction authors have been expressing. We share in it. We have put forward every solution we can think of, and our solutions have been rejected or rebuffed from the authors involved, with no alternative courses of action suggested.

Despite the unpleasant process, the anthology is doing well for such a specific niche (gay tentacle stories have a limited audience), and the reviews (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15719098.All_Wrapped_Up) we have received have been very positive. Readers have expressed that they look forward to reading other works by the authors as well. The writing was excellent, and the finished product has been enjoyed so far based on the feedback we've received.

~K. Piet

Marketing Director
Storm Moon Press, LLC
http://www.stormmoonpress.com/

LaylahHunter
09-06-2012, 10:44 PM
Kris,

The biggest source of my concern here is that I don't know why you decided in the first place that Elizabeth had the experience and the track record to be your experimental case for this approach. I would think that when you first placed a book for your press in the hands of someone outside your "core" circle, you would want to be sure that person had a proven editorial record (by contrast, Elizabeth admitted to me that she was "still learning" when I pushed back on some of the edits she suggested for my story). And I am unimpressed that SMP as a publisher apparently had so little oversight over the process that all errors and hiccups in the production of the anthology could be hers alone.

Regarding proof copies: when we received our copies of the PDF, the accompanying email did not say anything about reviewing them and making changes; quite the opposite, in fact:

Between my last anthology and this one, SMP stopped doing proofs for anthologies. My mistake: I didn't ask them in advance if their processes had changed; I've learned my lesson and feel bad about misinforming you. But this means that your commitment is through, so you end up doing less work.Clearly something was severely miscommunicated at some point in the process.

I will review the current PDF when I have the chance to sit down with it and do so (probably this weekend), and be in touch about any remaining problems.

StormMoonPress
09-06-2012, 11:35 PM
@Laylah: Wow. That quote really does drive home how vastly miscommunicated this was. I can only apologize for that, since that is definitely not the message we wanted sent to the authors. Here is a bit of the e-mail that our managing editor sent to Elizabeth with regards to the PDFs:


(E-mail sent 7/26) "The only changes made to any of the stories were grammatical. There's no altering that. If the authors get you any last minute changes (which we will take until Tuesday night before it goes live for those who pre-ordered), we'll make them if we agree (again, not changing grammatical ones that we corrected)."

Following that e-mail, we sent another on 7/30--still a week prior to the release of the e-books to those who pre-ordered--with an updated PDF that we wanted sent to you all. We had caught a few errors and formatting issues, so that newer PDF had those changes made. While we did think it odd that we hadn't heard back from any of the authors with corrections, those e-mails would have been passed to us via Elizabeth. I share all this for transparency's sake, and I'm very sorry that there was so much miscommunication going on with the proof PDFs. Storm Moon Press always sends proof copies to the authors, and that includes anthologies.

When it comes to trusting Elizabeth with this, it comes back to that common conundrum of requiring experience for an entry level job. When it comes to anthologies, it's usually a matter of the editor following the house style guide and asking questions when the editor is uncertain about something. Whenever Elizabeth asked about certain elements of the editing (and she did so on several occasions), our managing editor was right there to guide her and correct her when she was doing something counterproductive to the house style guide. There was less input from the publisher than in our past anthologies, but there was by no means a 100% disconnect between us and Elizabeth throughout the process. If there were problems, we trusted she would bring them to our attention.

Ultimately, we started this anthology with the assurance of the editor that she could handle the challenge and the added responsibility. We took a calculated risk with this format and this particular editor, and we are very sorry that it has turned out so negatively. Rest assured that, should we ever try this format again in the future, it will be with an editor who has proven themselves up to the task, as well as who will be watched from start to finish with more input from our side of things. This has been a learning experience for us as well, and one that we are sorry has been such a negative one for all involved. We are deeply sorry.

Thank you for your willingness to look over your story and let us know where the problems are. I fully encourage you (and the other authors in the anthology) to take a look over the PDF from the author bookshelf on the SMP site. If any of you find errors that you would like to bring to our attention, we are more than happy to assess them and, if they aren't contrary to our house style guide, make the changes and redistribute both the ebooks and our print book for the anthology. This is part of the author-publisher interaction that we would never shy away from. We want you all to be happy with the finished product, even if the process has been difficult thus far.

~K. Piet

Foinah
09-06-2012, 11:41 PM
Kris,
It is very nice to see a publisher responding to the questions and concerns posted with such professionalism. That goes a long way in my book ;)
However, I have one question.
If the anthology editing was sub par, as you admitted, why was the product released? Even an experimental product should go out polished and ready.
I'm very happy that the anthology is receiving good reviews, but as a publisher I would hope that you would hold your company to the highest standard regarding published works.

I agree with LaylaHunter that placing the blame solely on the editor's shoulders is perhaps off sides.

I wish SMP nothing but success in the future, and I hope that this incident will be a valuable lesson regarding quality oversight.

Cheers.

ETA: I cross posted with your reply ;)
Wishing you the best of luck with your future endeavors!

StormMoonPress
09-07-2012, 12:04 AM
@Foinah: Thank you for your response. With regards to the book being released on schedule despite the difficult process with the editor, we went forward because we did everything we could to make up for that editing by doing passes of additional proofreading. Like I said, despite that difficulty, we went back through and did more passes. Structurally, the stories were very strong to begin with (the authors truly are fantastic writers), so we went through to correct things that the original editor had obviously missed with regards to our house style. I myself did one pass through, and an additional proofreader and our managing editor did proofreading passes as well. In the end, the anthology was not just thrown out there as it was handed to us. We just want to assure you of that.

When it comes to blame for the issues of this anthology, there is certainly enough to go around, and that includes us as the publisher. We should have been more communicative and involved. We fully admit that and have tried to address our oversights. Again, All Wrapped Up is an anomaly when it comes to our anthologies. It's the only one we have published in this manner, and we don't want everyone to assume that this was business as usual. These were very unique circumstances, and the problems did abound. We will do our utmost to avoid the same problems in the future.

It certainly is a valuable lesson, and one that we as the publisher have taken to heart.

~K. Piet

michael_b
09-07-2012, 04:17 AM
Frankly I'm impressed that no one--publisher or authors--came in with the flaming fingers of doom to adamantly defend the publisher here. In fact the publisher came here to explain what happened, even shouldering part of the blame for problems with this 'experiment'.

It's a fact of life that publishers have people at their helm, and people--even experienced ones--can make mistakes.

My hat is off to K. Piet for coming here and replying in a reasonable tone without playing the 'mean people' card.

StormMoonPress
09-07-2012, 06:42 AM
@Michael_b - Thank you for your comment and your compliment. I really do try to stay very grounded. This has, admittedly, been a very difficult situation for all parties involved. We aren't infallible as a publisher, and we're capable of making mistakes and admitting to them when it happens. What we try our best to do, however, is put things right. It's one of the things that's really important to us as a small press. We want our authors to have the best experience possible. Laylah has been nothing but professional with us as well, and I'd like to sincerely thank her for that.

~K. Piet

SamanthaLehane
10-26-2012, 12:14 AM
I have had my eye on this publisher for awhile. I have a novella series in the works that would suit them especially their serialized fiction call (http://www.stormmoonpress.com/serials.aspx). They are new but I liked the publisher's professionalism here and they seem like they doing well at embracing all letters of the LGBT community.

Are there any SMP authors on this site that can share their experiences in promotion and sales with the press?

LaylahHunter
10-26-2012, 12:28 AM
Hi Samantha!

My only experience with SMP is with an anthology, so I wouldn't be at all surprised if single-author titles have pretty different sales numbers, but for what it's worth -- the SMP site lets authors see their sales data when we're logged in, and I'm currently showing a total of 148 copies sold for the anthology I'm in (released August 10 of this year). I don't think that includes the on-site preorders, which I believe totaled another 35 or so.

Promo-wise, we got a week-long blog tour leading up to the book's release, and review copies were provided to several book bloggers who have reviewed the book. I'm pretty sure Kris watches this thread closely, so she'll probably be able to give you more info soon about other promo stuff they've done or planned for various titles.

Good luck with your series! :)

SamanthaLehane
10-26-2012, 12:40 AM
Thanks, Laylah!

Ooo, instant gratification on sales numbers.

According to Veinglory's Erotic Romance site, that is about half the average for sales for the LGBT publisher Torquere in a year (359 sales per year).

What category was your anthology in? Lesbian, trans, gay, bi? I'm writing a lesbian sci-fi fantasy story with vampires, space pirates, gangsters, and psychotic blondes. You know, the stuff that dreams are made of. ;p Some LGBT publishers skew more towards m/m sales so it would be interesting to see what SMP's sales were for f/f.

Awesome. That sounds great like some great promo and is a good stepping stone for an author to build on.

SamanthaLehane
10-26-2012, 12:45 AM
Just went to your blog, because I'm nosy like that, and saw the entry about the Devil's Bargain, the Devil's Kiss (http://forbidden-fiction.com/library/story/LH2-1.000085). That looks really interesting. :D

LaylahHunter
10-26-2012, 12:51 AM
Ah, thank you! That was a fun little piece to write. :3

The anthology that I did with SMP was m/m -- they're open to other parts of the rainbow and have a few titles in other categories, but so far most of their catalog is m/m. (I think that's a matter of what they get submitted most often as much as a matter of their editorial focus.)

And lesbian sci-fi with space pirates and gangsters sounds fabulous! Definitely something the world needs more of. I hope you can find them a good home! :3

SamanthaLehane
10-26-2012, 01:02 AM
It shows by their anthology calls that they are actively trying to publish lesbian fiction which is a plus. I definitely saw a few calls for 2013 that looked pretty tempting and fun to write for!

Oh, yeah, m/m fic has a vast fanbase so I can see why they would get more m/m submissions.

Thank you.

michael_b
10-26-2012, 04:53 AM
It shows by their anthology calls that they are actively trying to publish lesbian fiction which is a plus. I definitely saw a few calls for 2013 that looked pretty tempting and fun to write for!

Oh, yeah, m/m fic has a vast fanbase so I can see why they would get more m/m submissions.

Thank you.

Yes, those anthology calls are all very interesting. I have a number of them in my notebook waiting for me to come up with stories for them.

M/m had a huge underground readership to start with it was just a matter of advertising on the right sites to bring them out of the basement fanfic sites and route them to the publishers. The growth of m/m has been huge in the last 8 years.

SamanthaLehane
10-26-2012, 06:44 AM
I saved couple in notepad too. I have a half finished manuscript that might suit their 'Police State' anthology call. I hope that I can finish it before the due date.

I totally agree. I've been friends with slashers and wrote some slash fic (Spike/Angel>Spike/Buffy + Angel/Buffy) so I get the appeal. Lesbian fic shouldn't be too far behind on the ebook trend. Bold Strokes Books and other print lesbian publishers are finally getting with the times.

StormMoonPress
10-26-2012, 10:29 AM
@SamanthaLehane: Thank you for your messages here! I shared them with the other owners of the press, and we were thrilled to hear that you've checked us out a bit and enjoyed what you've seen so far! We're relatively new to the scene, but we feel we bring something special to the genre.

Just to rehash what Laylah already brought up, our sales numbers for the "All Wrapped Up" anthology that Laylah wrote for are currently at 190 copies sold. It has exceeded our expectations so far, given that the anthology is a very niche topic that won't appeal to everyone. Our lesbian anthology (which might be of more interest to you, perhaps? ^_^), Daughters of Artemis, which has been out 15 months, has sold 354 copies. That anthology has also done pretty well, considering that we were a very new press when we put it out and also considering that lesbian fiction, in general, doesn't sell quite as well as gay fiction at the moment. We're trying to be a platform for lesbian, bisexual, and trans* fiction in addition to gay fiction, though, so we hope to put out more titles in the QUILTBAG over the coming years!

We definitely have an interest in lesbian fiction. We practically beg authors to send us more lesbian submissions, both for anthologies and for single-releases! There's definitely a lack of quality lesbian fiction out there, and it's something that we really want to remedy! If you're looking for a place to publish your lesbian fiction, I hope you'll keep us in mind! We have a unique royalty structure for single releases in which, once the press has recouped the costs of production for the book (editing, cover art, typesetting, etc.), the author reaches what we call a flip point. At that point, when the press has 'broken even', the author gets a higher royalty percentage. (Example: direct sales from site - author receives 50% cover; after flip point, author receives 70% cover.) If you'd like more info on the specifics, it's all on our website: http://www.stormmoonpress.com/submissions.aspx

When it comes to promotion, you'd be working directly with me! I always book up blog tours for the releases we put out. The length of the blog tour often depends on the length of the release and the interest of the author(s) to promo their work. Anthologies involve guests posts and/or interviews of the authors or editors (sometimes a combination of both). Different authors like different levels of involvement when it comes to promotion, so I would be in touch with you about how much you would want to do, should we extend a contract to you.

All in all, though, we are certainly looking to publish all parts of the QUILTBAG rainbow, so don't be afraid to try us out with an anthology or to pitch us one of your completed works that you're looking to publish! Thank you so much for your interest!

~K. Piet

Marketing Director
Storm Moon Press, LLC
http://www.stormmoonpress.com/

SamanthaLehane
10-26-2012, 01:45 PM
Thank you for your messages here! I shared them with the other owners of the press, and we were thrilled to hear that you've checked us out a bit and enjoyed what you've seen so far! We're relatively new to the scene, but we feel we bring something special to the genre.

Daughters of Artemis, which has been out 15 months, has sold 354 copies.

Thanks for all the sales numbers! That kind of transparency is very much appreciated. It seems like SMP is selling as well as older LGBT epresses. It seems that despite its youth, SMP has certainly has done its homework.

We practically beg authors to send us more lesbian submissions, both for anthologies and for single-releases!

It totally shows by the anthology calls that SMP is more than just friendly to good lesbian fiction. I'll keep it at the top of my list.

I've seen SMP author's package and its very well done. The flip point is awesome. That definitely sweetens the pot. ;)

Different authors like different levels of involvement when it comes to promotion, so I would be in touch with you about how much you would want to do, should we extend a contract to you.

Its always good to hear that their isn't a one sized fits all approach to promotion. I like making vids, playlists, and graphics so its good to know that SMP would take advantage of that.

It was great to hear from you, K. Piet. Thank you so much for stopping into the thread and answering my questions!

StormMoonPress
10-27-2012, 12:24 AM
@SamanthaLehane: Not a problem at all! We're happy to engage and answer questions! Thanks for your interest, and if you have any other questions for us as the press, we're happy to address them via e-mail at editor@stormmoonpress.com.

~K. Piet

michael_b
02-16-2013, 01:33 AM
Submitted: 10/12/2012 for anthology closing on 12/31/2012
First Reader Approval: 1/17/2013--acceptance dependent on antho filling
Contract Issued: 2/14/2013 (Happy Valentine's Day to me!)

They've also expressed an interest in more stories set in the world-setting used for my submission.

Fanatic_Dreamer
02-16-2013, 11:27 PM
I've been in contact with the owner of Storm Moon Press and she's been nothing but respectful and professional.

She currently has my full and I'll post back how it goes. I'm still waiting to hear back and very nervous!

elindsen
02-17-2013, 10:25 PM
I'm a bit confused (Easy thing ;))

In the submission guidelines, it says you except short stories for antho calls only, but you have them separate. Are shorts under 20k for special calls only?

Thanks!

SamanthaLehane
02-17-2013, 11:55 PM
"Are shorts under 20k for special calls only?"

I was wondering something similar. I have a short story that I was going to submit to a call and I posted about that here. I deleted the entry when I got confused on the story length and decided against submitting the story.

There are contrary bits of information in terms of short stories.

On one page:

We accept submissions for:
Short stories (5,000 to 19,999 words)[...] Short story submissions are limited to anthology lines and themed releases only, no exceptions,
General Submissions (http://www.stormmoonpress.com/submissions.aspx)

Then on the anthology page (http://www.stormmoonpress.com/anthologies.aspx):

Submissions must be between 10,000 and 20,000 words.

So, the question for me is, how do you submit stories between 5-10k? I have looked through their short stories and have found stories under 10k.

StormMoonPress
02-18-2013, 01:21 AM
Hello, Elindsen & Samantha! We've sent a response to your e-mail inquiry, but I wanted to post this up here just in case others ended up having the same questions. Obviously, there were more than two people getting confused, so I'm happy to try to clarify!

Typically, there are a couple anthology calls throughout the year that call for a shorter length than our usual 10-20K (such as our Coffee Break Quickies call, which could be anything from 2,500 to 5,000 in length, or Queer Fear, which was 8-12K). We will also consider short stories under 10,000 words from authors who have contracted with us previously. An example of this is Cornelia Grey's Apples and Regret and Wasted Time. That short was one we took a chance on, and it's had an incredibly positive reception.

In our experience, short stories, especially ones shorter than 10,000 words, don't sell as well as novella or novel length submissions. As such, we're taking more of a risk on contracting short stories, so we pick and choose carefully when it comes to extending contracts for single release short stories. Now, if you have several short stories that you put together into a single-author collection, that's a slightly different situation, and we would deal with that kind of submission on a case by case basis.

I hope this answered everyone's questions! If any aspect of our policy is still confusing, please don't hesitate to e-mail us with the question. We're always happy to help out so you know whether your stories are a good fit with us or not.

Thanks again for bringing this up!

~K. Piet

Marketing Director
Storm Moon Press, LLC
http://www.stormmoonpress.com/

SamanthaLehane
02-18-2013, 01:35 AM
Thanks for the quick response, K. Piet!

This does clarify the situation for me. :D

WriterInChains
06-15-2014, 09:41 PM
Anything new in the world of Storm Moon/Budding Moon?
I'm polishing a YA novel and am thinking about sending it to them.
TIA! :)

LaylahHunter
06-15-2014, 09:56 PM
Last I heard anything official, they weren't accepting submissions from people who weren't already published with them -- but that was several months ago, before they switched to a new author loop; my request to join the new one has never been approved.

They did host a convention this spring, and told at least one author afterward that they wanted to focus more on the con and "scale back SMP in a lot of ways"; Q1 royalty payments were late, apparently due to the conference and pet health issues, and several of us got emails offering us the chance to buy back our stories from them during the delay. Draw what conclusions you will from that.

adrinyme
06-16-2014, 12:55 AM
A friend had payment issues last year, as well. The owners needed to move on short notice and didn't have the money to do that and also pay their authors. I think it was June? I don't know more than that, but it's a recurring issue, from what Laylah says about this year's delays.

MorganHarcourt
06-16-2014, 01:45 AM
I was one of the authors offered the buyout option-- as a completely different interpretation of the "editor fee" clause clarified in post #22. Rather than being a fee to take ownership of the typeset galleys as stated in this thread, I was told that this clause would allow me to buy a partial rights reversion. Storm Moon Press would retain the nonexclusive right to publish and sell the story as part of the anthology it originally appeared in, but not as a standalone short story. The price I was quoted for the reversion was the editor's fee from the contract, minus the amount they were in arrears for my royalties.

Notably, given how the clause was interpreted here before, the amended contract would have required me to pay an additional fee on top of the reversion to use the typeset galleys. I would have been required to attribute the story to Storm Moon Press in any future publication (a clause not present in my original contract) regardless of whether or not these galleys were purchased.

In the interests of full disclosure: I didn't take the option, and I was paid my full royalties owed after I declined the buyout. I have no interest in self-publishing the story in question and it's not enough of a reversion to attempt to place the work elsewhere, so this option didn't make much economic sense for me.

WriterInChains
06-16-2014, 02:29 AM
Thanks for the update. I didn't see anything on the website that said they aren't accepting unsolicited manuscripts, but I could've looked through it (wouldn't be the first time). :)

StormMoonPress
06-16-2014, 03:48 AM
To answer WriterInChains' question, yes, we're now open to unsolicited submissions again. However, what Laylah said about us scaling back is correct. We've wanted SMP to remain small, and the growth began to go beyond our original intent for the press. So, while we're still open to submissions (both for our anthologies and full, unsolicited manuscripts), we are being more particular about what we acquire and have a new acquisitions editor who is very meticulous. Doesn't mean no one has a chance getting published with us, but it does mean we want to pick and choose which books we go ahead with for the future.

~K. Piet

Marketing Director
Storm Moon Press, LLC

TheOtherDuckling
08-31-2014, 07:19 PM
Can anyone tell me about how long to expect to hear back from Storm Moon Press for Anthology submissions? I've searched the website but couldn't find much info, and I sent an email over a month ago and still haven't heard anything.

WildScribe
09-02-2014, 07:46 AM
Can anyone tell me about how long to expect to hear back from Storm Moon Press for Anthology submissions? I've searched the website but couldn't find much info, and I sent an email over a month ago and still haven't heard anything.

Hi! SMP's Acquisitions Director, here. We aim for about 8 weeks, but we've got a bit of a backlog at the moment. I'm sorry to hear that we missed your email. I personally check the box at stormmoonpress at gmail dot com, so please do feel free to shoot me an email if you have any concerns.

Best,
Kathleen

TheOtherDuckling
09-04-2014, 01:17 AM
I personally check the box at stormmoonpress at gmail dot com, so please do feel free to shoot me an email if you have any concerns.

Best,
Kathleen

Thanks Kathleen! I hadn't been able to find that email on the site, so I ended up sending my message to the editors email provided under the 'contact us' page.

Fallen
09-04-2014, 01:38 PM
Congrats on the new aquisitions position, WildS. :)

StormMoonPress
11-16-2014, 03:12 AM
Hello, everyone. This is just a quick, official statement from us owners at SMP.

Effective immediately, Storm Moon Press has closed its doors to outside submissions. There are several reasons behind this, but it is mostly because one of us owners has become chronically ill, so our priorities as individuals have shifted toward taking care of the health issues that have arisen. With less time to devote to Storm Moon Press, we are basically shutting our doors. This might ultimately be a temporary thing, but it will at the very least be an extended hiatus. The press' website will remain open, and various titles will remain on sale. At this time, we are in communication with our authors to see if they would like to negotiate for their rights back (it's not their fault we're so drastically cutting back with the press, after all) or let their books with us see out their contract terms to their natural ends. Each author is being treated individually, which means that our catalog might go through a few changes in the next couple months as we get all our current authors squared away.

After that, there will be the occasional release from the press, but we won't be putting out very many titles each year. Those we do will be either titles that are currently in production or from authors who have worked with us in the past and choose to do so again.

We're incredibly grateful to all the authors and staff who have worked with us at SMP, and are humbled by those who are continuing to do so as we go through this transition and face the health and wellness challenges that we're up against at our home base.

Thank you to readers for your patronage and support over the last five years we've been in business. Without all the readers and the exceptional authors we've worked with, Storm Moon Press would never have been a reality, and you all have our most sincere gratitude.

~K. Piet, S.L. Armstrong, Roger Armstrong

Owners
Storm Moon Press, LLC

CaPooF
03-15-2015, 02:47 AM
I don't see anything on the Storm Moon submission guidelines pages about being closed to submissions - have things changed?

StormMoonPress
03-18-2015, 09:23 AM
Hello, CaPooF.

We are currently closed to submissions. The press has downsized greatly, so apart from a couple ongoing projects that we already have contracted in our queue and our open anthology calls, we are closed to submissions. I'm sorry for the confusion. I'll have a word with our webmaster to try to make everything more clear on the website.

~K. Piet

Owner, Marketing Director
Storm Moon Press, LLC

michael_b
09-02-2015, 07:58 PM
Hello, CaPooF.

We are currently closed to submissions. The press has downsized greatly, so apart from a couple ongoing projects that we already have contracted in our queue and our open anthology calls, we are closed to submissions. I'm sorry for the confusion. I'll have a word with our webmaster to try to make everything more clear on the website.

~K. Piet

Owner, Marketing Director
Storm Moon Press, LLC

Just an FYI: The website hasn't been updated and still shows info from 2013.

CaoPaux
04-22-2018, 02:02 AM
No activity after '16.