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View Full Version : How do you bake a bread so hard that it is inedible?



Exir
12-30-2009, 10:17 AM
As in, if you have a normal mixture of dough, what do you have to add to it so that the bread will become rock-solid if it is baked?

Many thanks.

Wayne K
12-30-2009, 10:21 AM
I'll have to ask my wife :D

aruna
12-30-2009, 10:22 AM
Ask me to bake it for you; watch and learn.
But I would think it has something to do with yeast or whatever makes the bread rise; forget to put it in?

Nakhlasmoke
12-30-2009, 10:24 AM
Ask a dwarf.

Matera the Mad
12-30-2009, 10:46 AM
No yeast, no shortening. Thud. Ugh.

Medievalist
12-30-2009, 10:54 AM
As in, if you have a normal mixture of dough, what do you have to add to it so that the bread will become rock-solid if it is baked?

Many thanks.

If you kill the yeast just before putting it in the oven.

If you leave out the leavening (yeast, or baking power/baking soda/beer).

If you cook it in a "slow" oven--that is cook it too long a too low a temp.

Exir
12-30-2009, 11:28 AM
Many thanks. The yeast option is good enough.

Medievalist
12-30-2009, 11:36 AM
I will confess once making biscuits with yeast, using a recipe I'd use oh, forty times, with my mom watching me while I worked--that were normal looking when they went in the oven, at the right temperature, and cooked for the right length of time, but when they came out, though the color and "doneness" was normal looking, they'd shrunk to about and inch and a half in size, and were hard as rock.

We have no idea at all what went wrong . . . but the birds wouldn't even eat them.

BillPatt
12-30-2009, 05:40 PM
Many thanks. The yeast option is good enough.

Except you specified a "normal mass of dough". That would presume that the yeast or baking soda is already in there.

Hardness (as opposed to density) comes about by driving all the water out of the mixture, which would make the gluten stiffen to immobility. Baking it too long is what turns bread to pretzels. Pretzels work because they aren't too thick. Imagine a pretzel with the cross section of a slice of regular bread. I wouldn't eat it either.

Now, if you leave out yeast or baking soda, you have a dense bread, but one that is edible, if not baked too long. It's called matzoh, ask any observant Jew. It's not a lot of fun to eat, but it won't break your teeth.

Nivarion
01-01-2010, 07:04 AM
If you really really overknead it and then allow it to over proof you'll get a pretty inedible bread. It'll come out dry and tough as paper.

but you could still eat it.

Too much yeast makes a pretty inedible bread. Ah the days when I was just learning to cook. Didn't quite understand what it meant by a "Package."

C.bronco
01-01-2010, 07:07 AM
Put it on 500 degrees, and then go shopping and forget until later that night?

L.C. Blackwell
01-01-2010, 08:40 AM
Put it on 500 degrees, and then go shopping and forget until later that night?

You want it hard, not incinerated. :D

Probably the easiest thing to do would be to leave the yeast out, bake it, and then let it dry in a "slow" oven for several hours, with the temperature at 200 or less. Then leave it, unwrapped, on top of a dehumidifier. By the next day or so, you should have a chunk of bread about the consistency of a brick.

L.C. Blackwell
01-01-2010, 08:55 AM
Now that I think about it, that wasn't really your question, was it? Assuming that you want to start with a normal dough, bake it normally and still have it come out rock hard and inedible.... Hmnnn....

I have ideas, but I am not sure that it is perfectly safe to bake quick-set concrete in the oven....

:popcorn:

Canotila
01-01-2010, 12:37 PM
Once my sister made a round loaf of irish soda bread. It was about the size of a volleyball. Something went so terribly wrong it came out like a boulder. We tried chipping bits off to sample but were too afraid of breaking our teeth.

Even the chickens and dogs refused to touch it. It made a fine doorstop until my dad threw it away.

Kathie Freeman
01-01-2010, 09:24 PM
Bake it at a low setting for a couple of hours.

Cyia
01-01-2010, 09:50 PM
Salt.

Purple Tulip
01-03-2010, 07:44 AM
An easy mistake someone might make is to put the bread in the oven before it is fully heated. The low, warm temperature will cause the yeast to go nuts and essentially over proof the bread. Then when the oven reaches a hot enough temperature to kill the yeast, the bread will have collapsed on itself. Voila! A brick.

Shamrockgreen
01-03-2010, 08:49 AM
i don't know, but it happens everytime I try to bake bread.

scottishpunk
01-04-2010, 08:25 PM
No yeast is what I'd say. It'll come out just like a lump.