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View Full Version : How reading affects the brain



ColoradoGuy
12-28-2009, 10:07 AM
We've had various threads now and then about how the act of reading, of our brains' comprehending the meaning of the words, activates various centers of the brain. If you're interested in this sort of thing (and I am), you might check out Livia Blackburne's blog here (http://blog.liviablackburne.com/2009/10/narrative-and-brain.html). She is a writer and budding neuroscientist at MIT whose research involves just that issue. It's perhaps a Quixotic goal -- to relate how different sorts of writing affect the brain in different ways. Her blog also has oodles of links to other interesting places that discuss the same thing.

David Wisehart
12-28-2009, 10:53 AM
Cool. Thanks.

Cassiopeia
12-28-2009, 11:03 AM
I'm not sure if this applies but I've found the only way for me to retain anything I learn, is to take the information I've read and rewrite it into statements with my own words, physically with a pencil first, then typing it up.

I can't learn as well if I don't. The best setting for me to learn or process is through a classroom lecture with visual aids, the sound of the lecturer's voice and note taking. If I skip the note taking, I lose 3/4's of the information that's given.

AliceWrites
01-21-2010, 01:35 AM
Thanks for this link.

My daughter has recently been diagnosed with asperger's and she can read a book very quickly. She can also retain and recall facts, figures, books and authors at will. She also has peculiar ways of interpreting words and language, so this is all very interesting indeed.

Brad
02-06-2010, 09:45 PM
Did anyone see the Frontline documentary - "Digital Nation" or something? They talked about a study that showed that surfing Google actually involves more brain activity than reading a book. But then they hinted that it doesn't necessarily mean it is a greater mental workout, which I don't understand.

JimmyB27
02-24-2010, 07:40 PM
I'm not sure if this applies but I've found the only way for me to retain anything I learn, is to take the information I've read and rewrite it into statements with my own words, physically with a pencil first, then typing it up.

I can't learn as well if I don't. The best setting for me to learn or process is through a classroom lecture with visual aids, the sound of the lecturer's voice and note taking. If I skip the note taking, I lose 3/4's of the information that's given.
When I was at uni, some lecturers would provide the lecture notes online. Me, being the lazy git that I am, never bothered with my own notes for these lectures and I invariably struggled more with these subjects.

Alpha Echo
02-24-2010, 08:29 PM
I'm definitely going to check out the link.


I'm not sure if this applies but I've found the only way for me to retain anything I learn, is to take the information I've read and rewrite it into statements with my own words, physically with a pencil first, then typing it up.

I can't learn as well if I don't. The best setting for me to learn or process is through a classroom lecture with visual aids, the sound of the lecturer's voice and note taking. If I skip the note taking, I lose 3/4's of the information that's given.

I am exactly the same way. That's always how I've learned best.

the_Unknown
03-03-2010, 06:50 AM
The article is so broad it's basically useless.

If I had their equipment I'd post video/photos and do exhaustive testing.

Wind Ann Wise
02-19-2018, 02:14 AM
That is a fascinating article! I love learning about how reading affects the brain.