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View Full Version : Writing what you want to write vs what you feel you SHOULD write



unlikelyheroine
12-26-2009, 07:52 PM
Hi there. I think to be honest that I already know the answer to this one in terms of what I myself should be doing, but I would be really interested to get people's opinions on whether they go through the same thing I do. My problem is, that I am motivated to write certain kinds of fiction - sci-fi and fantasy mostly, but also pretty standard crime and mystery fare. Now I have to concede that whilst I aim to write a decent story well, there are certain aspects of the fiction I enjoy writing that even I have to admit are somewhat "cheesy." Nonetheless I really enjoy setting all the ideas down on paper, in all their cheesiness!

My only problem is this feeling that when I write this type of thing I am being a little bit naughty and frivolous and that I should be writing (or trying to write) "realistic" fiction that means something... I'll be honest that I think a literary-type novel of weight and meaning is probably somewhat beyond me and that I believe I want to write for fun and enjoyment more than recognition or success etc. With that I mind, I believe I should just carry on enjoying myself... But does anyone else get that guilty feeling from time to time that they are writing something "fun"?

MGraybosch
12-26-2009, 08:01 PM
But does anyone else get that guilty feeling from time to time that they are writing something "fun"?

Not me. I know damned well that if I ever publish my work, I'll probably be scorned by the literary establishment as a hack. I know I'm not going to win any awards for Starbreaker, no matter how deep I dig into the psychology of my protagonist and antagonist. I'm fine with that. I didn't start writing because I thought I'd win the fucking Nobel Prize.

I started writing because I couldn't afford to have anything resembling a social life in high school and college, and didn't want to admit that I wasn't dating because I was broke. :evil

Wipe the word "should" from your vocabulary. Do it now. If you want to write science fiction, or mystery, or erotica, then write that -- and do the best damned job you can. That's your only obligation, and it's an obligation you owe to yourself first and foremost -- to decide for yourself, follow through, and give the work you've chosen for yourself the best effort you can.

And if anybody objects, tell 'em to fuck off.

Terie
12-26-2009, 08:13 PM
What Mgraybosch said. Also, if you aren't writing what you want to write but only what you think you should be writing, it'll show, it won't have the 'ring of truth' to it....and the work will probably fail. You have to write for yourself first. Anything else is cheating both yourself and any potential readers.

Mr Flibble
12-26-2009, 08:24 PM
But does anyone else get that guilty feeling from time to time that they are writing something "fun"?

Nope. You're looking at a woman who put turnips in because she knows it'll make her other half giggle, and five cameo appearances by wrestlers because my mates had fun trying to figure out which ones they were. I write for / with fun. And I still got accused of being deep the other day.

If it's not what you want to write...why do you want to write it? I write because I love to do so. Sometimes a bit of cheese gets in there. Okay, my first drafts look like they've been liberally sprinkled with Stilton lol. But if I want I can tone it down / tweak on the rewrite. And as Terie said, if it's not fun for you it'll show. If it's not fun for you, how the heck is it going to be emjoyable for the reader?

Sevvy
12-26-2009, 08:27 PM
Write what you want to write, and write it to the best of your ability.

CK Matthews
12-26-2009, 09:36 PM
Whoa, you're questioning whether you are allowed to write for fun? Of course. If you're not having fun, why do this? Writing is frustrating. Don't make it harder on yourself. I would write the kind of stuff that you enjoy both reading and writing. You're the one that's going to be spending hours with your work, at least initially.

Just have fun.

Kitty Pryde
12-26-2009, 09:56 PM
1. The notion that 'literary fiction' is more weighty, significant, meaningful, or important than 'genre fiction' is pure uncorrupted bullshit, pardon my french. If you're getting that message from anybody, stop listening to them. For reals. For a contrasting POV, google 'science fiction ghetto' or 'genre fiction ghetto' (not to be confused with the genre of ghetto fiction, a totally different thing :) )

2. Writing for fun versus writing for market: I don't think literary novels sell better than genre novels. I mean, every genre has its super-successful authors who sell zillions of books...but I don't think the average literary novelist is more recognized or successful than the average crime/mystery/SF/fantasy novelist. In fact I suspect the reverse is true. Within your chosen genre, you can tailor your writing more towards the market, or more towards what you have passion for. I think people succeed doing both.

Libbie
12-26-2009, 10:29 PM
My goodness -- we literary writers certainly don't have a corner on meaningful stories. I write literary fiction but I read more genre fiction than anything else -- I love sci-fi and fantasy, and I've even been known to enjoy a few romances and horrors here and there. Sci-fi and fantasy writers, like all others, and including literary writers, produce stories that are full of deep meaning, beautiful prose, and memorable images. I count Ursula K. LeGuin, Philip K. Dick, and Ray Bradbury among my most influential writers.

You should write whatever story you feel like you want to tell. If you're not writing the style and genre you love to write, you won't write your best. Whatever you produce will feel stretched, like it's trying too hard. Don't for a second think that because you're not writing something that would be marketed as "literary" or "mainstream" that you can't tell a meaningful, beautiful story that will last for generations.

Even if the only meaning you want to convey with your writing is fun entertainment, that's a perfectly lofty goal. It's a rare soul who can entertain an audience, and fun fiction has all my respect.

NeuroFizz
12-26-2009, 11:29 PM
The minute a writer climbs on a soapbox (which can result from forcing a socially redeeming message), he/she risks replacing entertainment with author intrusion and moralizing. While the two "sides" are not mutually exclusive, it's best to write what you want to write and not worry about how it plays out. Some people are able to write extremely entertaining stories that also carry heavy social messages, but I doubt they have to sit down and force themselves to do it that way. I suspect it just happens in much the same way our stories "happen" to us. Write the stories that are in you, not the ones you think should be around you.

BethS
12-27-2009, 12:16 AM
Write about what you're passionate about. Anything else will be a chore and will ring false to the reader.

scarletpeaches
12-27-2009, 12:20 AM
Write what you love. There's no nobility in writing like a martyr. That way lies automatic wallbangage.

C.M.C.
12-27-2009, 01:13 AM
If you don't enjoy what you're writing, no one else will. Indulge.

unlikelyheroine
12-27-2009, 05:48 AM
Thank you for all your replies, much appreciated. On the subject of the literary fiction etc, it's not that I think it is better so much as that is the message I get from some people around me but I take on board what is said here and I will just ignore them ;)

I've begun a WIP today which is a big steaming pile of cheese and such a self-indulgence in terms of subject matter (a sort of futuristic SF thing with a vague military feel, my favourite!) and I've got more than 1,000 words down. They're not great words but they're the beginnings of a first draft of something and they're 1,000 words I found very easy and fun to write, so I think, thanks to that little experiment and the helpful advice here, I have my answer!! :D

kaitie
12-27-2009, 07:51 AM
Nope. You're looking at a woman who put turnips in because she knows it'll make her other half giggle, and five cameo appearances by wrestlers because my mates had fun trying to figure out which ones they were. I write for / with fun. And I still got accused of being deep the other day.

If it's not what you want to write...why do you want to write it? I write because I love to do so. Sometimes a bit of cheese gets in there. Okay, my first drafts look like they've been liberally sprinkled with Stilton lol. But if I want I can tone it down / tweak on the rewrite. And as Terie said, if it's not fun for you it'll show. If it's not fun for you, how the heck is it going to be emjoyable for the reader?

To take this a step further, if it's not enjoyable to you, why the heck would you keep doing it?

Maxinquaye
12-27-2009, 02:54 PM
Writing is something you sit and tear your hair out about for months and months, instead of going to the pub with your friends. You better enjoy it, or you'll go mad.

That was a joke, but still not. There's a bit of truth in it. Unless you actually enjoy watching paint dry on the wall, then there's no point in engaging in this slooooow artform's composition stage. :D

Ruv Draba
12-27-2009, 03:52 PM
Depth is not about subject but what the writer has to say. And quality of writing is entirely the writer's skill -- not the subject written about.

Write what you'd read -- because what you read is what you'll think about, and the best writing you read will inspire you.

(And only let people tell you what you should write if they'll let you tell them what they should eat)

Mr Flibble
12-27-2009, 05:19 PM
Thank you for all your replies, much appreciated. On the subject of the literary fiction etc, it's not that I think it is better so much as that is the message I get from some people around me but I take on board what is said here and I will just ignore them ;)

Then tell them the truth. Literary fiction is just another genre, no more inherently 'worthy' than any other. It's a different style of writing, with different conventions, same as Romance generally has different conventions to Fantasy. That's all.

Lady Ice
12-27-2009, 07:51 PM
I think when you're writing intending to publish or you want to 'make it big' then you get worried that your work is 'insignificant' or 'slight' but if you're writing out of mere obligation, you won't enjoy it and it won't be as important to you if other people enjoy it.

painkillers
12-27-2009, 07:59 PM
Just because literary types dislike SF&F don't mean they're right. I'd much rather read about whizz-bang starships and flash-bang spell craft that wham-bang relationship drivel.

That article in Wired: ah so, now I understand why post-apocalyptic etc no longer means Science Fiction; is that where 'Magic Realism' came from to?

Libbie
12-27-2009, 08:16 PM
it's not that I think it is better so much as that is the message I get from some people around me

Then hang out with more people who know genre writing is valuable art, and less people who don't read it. :D

Libbie
12-27-2009, 08:19 PM
Just because literary types dislike SF&F don't mean they're right. I'd much rather read about whizz-bang starships and flash-bang spell craft that wham-bang relationship drivel.

Heeeey! There are lots of us literary types who also love starships and spells and talking animals and all the rest. I sure wish more literary readers (and writers!) would pull their heads out of their butts and read some good sf&f. There really is some amazing writing to be found in that genre.


That article in Wired: ah so, now I understand why post-apocalyptic etc no longer means Science Fiction; is that where 'Magic Realism' came from to?

Ha!! I've got to read that. The other gal at the book store and I always rant over why certain authors' sci-fi books are shelved in Literary when they are CLEARLY sci-fi and belong on the Sci-fi shelves!

Jamesaritchie
12-27-2009, 08:54 PM
I think you have to write what you love to read, and hope a great big bunch of readers out there love the same thing.

Kitty27
12-27-2009, 09:03 PM
Write what you love and enjoy. In the struggle to land an agent,write a terrific query,a killer synopsis,go raving mad waiting for a response and such,many writers forget that writing IS fun!

If you don't enjoy what you're writing,WHY are you writing in the first place? I think that produces a rather resentful and bitter writer.

painkillers
12-27-2009, 09:14 PM
Heeeey! There are lots of us literary types who also love starships and spells and talking animals and all the rest. I sure wish more literary readers (and writers!) would pull their heads out of their butts and read some good sf&f. There really is some amazing writing to be found in that genre.

Shame on you for being so open minded. How are publishers supposed to market to you if you insist on reading whatever you like.

MGraybosch
12-27-2009, 11:23 PM
Shame on you for being so open minded. How are publishers supposed to market to you if you insist on reading whatever you like.

That's not Libbie's problem. It's not my problem either. In fact, don't market to me. Just publish the damned books and let me know what's going to hit the fan and when it will hit. I'll decide for myself if it's worthy of my attention.

ishtar'sgate
12-28-2009, 12:53 AM
But does anyone else get that guilty feeling from time to time that they are writing something "fun"?

Nope. I write to entertain. First myself and then other people.

NeuroFizz
12-28-2009, 01:09 AM
But does anyone else get that guilty feeling from time to time that they are writing something "fun"?
Writing is sometimes hard work and sometimes frustrating. But when you get to one of those times when writing is fun, try to slip on the spurs without spooking the critter, give it a good kick, and hold on for dear life. And it's okay to pleasurescream your lungs the whole while.

painkillers
12-28-2009, 02:34 AM
That's not Libbie's problem. It's not my problem either. In fact, don't market to me. Just publish the damned books and let me know what's going to hit the fan and when it will hit. I'll decide for myself if it's worthy of my attention.

Tut, all those poor Mad-men cast out of a job. Don't it just make you want to shed tears of blood? They spend ages targeting the right audience, sorting out the cover, getting the glowing testimonials from anybody they can find, and you still insist on making your own mind up. Sadness falls across the gaping hole where my soul used to be.:D

p.s. i stuck the emoticon at the end of the post this time.

MGraybosch
12-28-2009, 03:14 AM
Tut, all those poor Mad-men cast out of a job. Don't it just make you want to shed tears of blood?

Actually, the thought gives me a hard-on. But it's OK; I'll just take it out on my wife. Who needs Viagra when you can inflict well-deserved suffering? :evil

Kalyke
12-28-2009, 04:53 AM
I worked a long time to get the guts to start writing about the subject I really loved. The end result was constantly being kicked in the teeth by micro managing fools. I don't listen to them, or the fact that I may not get rich off what I do. Change is made by the people who refuse to be lemmings and follow the crowd. They write about authentic experiences or their inner visions-- not copy what happens to be out on the bookshelves today.

C. C.
12-28-2009, 08:05 AM
You should write what you like and have fun with it; otherwise you'll lose interest and never finish it. :)

thegirlwhowrites
12-28-2009, 09:01 AM
Nope. I write what I enjoy writing. I don't care for anything else and don't feel guilty about doing it.

nighttimer
12-28-2009, 10:21 AM
I'm with the "write what you like" crowd. When I was freelancing fulltime I found myself writing a lot of shit I knew I was only doing for a buck and knew I'd never read.

Write what you SHOULD write? Like what? The mythical Great American Novel? Write what feels real and honest and you don't feel like a sell-out for writing and the rest will take care of itself.

EclipsesMuse
12-28-2009, 10:25 AM
Write what you love. Cheesiness is just as needed as the moral, thought provoking stories.

I decided to write my novel because I thought it would be great to write about gods in the modern age. That's it. The story and character reactions have made it a bit deeper, but I still have had fun along the journey!

David Wisehart
12-28-2009, 10:52 AM
What you want to write is what you should be writing.

scarletpeaches
12-28-2009, 10:59 AM
What you want to READ is what you should be writing.

MGraybosch
12-28-2009, 05:07 PM
Be more selfish.

painkillers
12-28-2009, 06:59 PM
Truth, is the key. If you try to write you should be writing then you won't be writing truthfully. Fun, cheesy, writing what you want to write will most likely make truthfulness easy. Anyway, one person's cheese is another person's enjoyment.

CynV
12-29-2009, 04:14 AM
I'll be honest that I think a literary-type novel of weight and meaning is probably somewhat beyond me and that I believe I want to write for fun and enjoyment more than recognition or success etc.

I think you answered your own question there.

For me the writing HAS to be fun or I just don't do it. I never sit down with the intent to write what is "popular" or "trendy"...no way. Those ideas are fleeting at best. It's best just to write what you want to write. Part of the thrill of writing for me is to watch the story unfold in my head as I write it...for me I'm reading the book for the first time too, so it's necessary to be something that I enjoy.

Best to you in your writing endeavors wherever they lead.

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painkillers
12-29-2009, 04:20 AM
There is more meaning (on the nature of religion)at the end of the Hogfather than in the whole of the deep and meaningful His Dark Materials.

Going deep means you just drown in the symbolism. Stay light and you can hook the revelation out of nowhere as your skip across the dreaded depths of turgid meaningfulness.

AryaT92
12-29-2009, 04:57 AM
What I want to and what I should are the same thing.. :)

smcc360
12-29-2009, 06:15 PM
I envisioned myself writing globetrotting adventure and gritty, hard-boiled crime fiction, the kind of stuff I like to read.

I sat down to crank out my thousand words a day (just like Stephen King said to in On Writing), and when I came up for air, I had five pages of a guy who can shoot lightning bolts out of his hands beating up bank robbers.

The strange part, though, was that I really liked it.

So you gotta write what's in you, I guess. Even if only to get it out of your head, and see what comes out next .

sohalt
12-30-2009, 12:37 AM
There is more meaning (on the nature of religion)at the end of the Hogfather than in the whole of the deep and meaningful His Dark Materials.


I, too, like the Hogfather take on belief better than the notion of belief presented in His Dark Materials, but I wouldn't say either is more meaningful. One meaning resonates more with me than the other, but both reveal that the respective author has done some thinking on the subject. They seem to have come to different conclusions, but their thinking process is still interesting. And in both cases it's presented in a rather unobstrusive manner - you can read both books just for the story.

They are both very good examples for writing that doubles as fun escapist fluff and deep, meaningful stuff.

painkillers
12-30-2009, 01:18 AM
I, too, like the Hogfather take on belief better than the notion of belief presented in His Dark Materials, but I wouldn't say either is more meaningful. One meaning resonates more with me than the other, but both reveal that the respective author has done some thinking on the subject. They seem to have come to different conclusions, but their thinking process is still interesting. And in both cases it's presented in a rather unobstrusive manner - you can read both books just for the story.

They are both very good examples for writing that doubles as fun escapist fluff and deep, meaningful stuff.

Fair enough. I prefer Hogfather, because it is not supposed to be meaningful, but no real argument there.

sohalt
12-30-2009, 01:21 AM
I'll be honest that I think a literary-type novel of weight and meaning is probably somewhat beyond me

I suspect that you have a somewhat too narrow defintion of "literary-type novels of weight and meaning" if you think they are irreconcileable with fun. (Or you might just have a too narrow definition of fun).

And I agree with the general tenor that writing should be fun. It's such a frivolous activity in the first place, if you don't take at least some kind of pleasure in it, there hardly will be enough benefits to justify that particular use of time.

But I'm going a bit against the grain now in so far as I'd like to point out that questioning your desires can be quite an interesting exercise, because it allows you to gain a deeper understanding of them. (Of course there would be no fun to be had, if we wouldn't go through with them in spite of everything occassionally, but the fact that we examined them before, can add new interesting dimensions to our pursuits).

Desires are strange beasts, they are not always what they seem to be on the surface, they are not always completley our own. (So many people make a living selling prefabricated dreams...) It's often a good idea to dig a bit deeper.

Why do you think that your favorite scenarios are cheesy? Do they rely on worn out tropes? It might be interesting to think about the factors that make these tropes so powerful and unkillable, the surely legitimate needs they meet (and almost all needs are legitimate) and the potentially problematic ways in which they do this. By thinking about these things you might come about a way to put a new spin on them. (You don't have to brutally deconstruct them, there's also much pleasure to be had with gentle subversion. Or just play some of them straight once in a while - if every single trope is convulsively messed with, that can get old too... keep it unpredictable. Be playful about it.) Makes your story unique, still allows you to deal with your favorite tropes and gives your reader something to think about. Where could be the harm in that?

Of course I can only speak for myself, but I've noticed that the stories I make up for my own pleasure have changed as I've developed more complex notions of love and power.

Writing deep, meaningful works of literary merit is rarely done by putting characters on a soap-box and having them make pretty speeches about IMPORTANT ISSUES. It's done by staying away from prefabricted dreams and facile simplifications. I don't think that this necessarily spoils any fun.

sohalt
12-30-2009, 01:30 AM
Fair enough. I prefer Hogfather, because it is not supposed to be meaningful, but no real argument there.

That's not how I would put it. Every use of language is supposed to carry meaning by definition. I'd go so far as to say that there is nothing without meaning (because either everything has meaning or nothing has). But we clearly have a different understanding of the meaning of "meaning".

I guess what you want to say is that you prefer Hogfather because it comes across as less pretentious. Fair enough. To me, His Dark Materials did not come across as particularly pretentious either (it had battles and romance and mystery and suspense and all other ingredients of a good fantasy romp, so it did not exactly read like a philosophical treatise; but I guess it did have a more serious tone) - but that's admittedly very subjective. So, agreed - no real argument there.

MGraybosch
01-01-2010, 06:21 AM
Going deep means you just drown in the symbolism.

I don't buy that. Who says that that "going deep" means dicking around with symbolism? You could go deep into your characters, dig into their motives, and find plenty of meaningful stuff.

painkillers
01-01-2010, 08:32 PM
I don't buy that. Who says that that "going deep" means dicking around with symbolism? You could go deep into your characters, dig into their motives, and find plenty of meaningful stuff.

Different definitions of deep. I was talking about symbolism etc, because I don't see why you would write character driven fiction without going deeply into their personalities, motivations, and so on. You may not tell all, and leave stuff unwritten, but it should be there all the same. Every character should be 3d (god how i hate that dimensional stuff when talking about characters) by the last draft, even the one line -- or no line -- wonders.

I don't call that going deep. I call that writing ;)

Jamesaritchie
01-01-2010, 08:43 PM
[QUOTE=painkillers;4432257]Different definitions of deep. I was talking about symbolism etc, because I don't see why you would write character driven fiction without going deeply into their personalities, motivations, and so on. You may not tell all, and leave stuff unwritten, but it should be there all the same. Every character should be 3d (god how i hate that dimensional stuff when talking about characters) by the last draft, even the one line -- or no line -- wonders.



We sure agree on the 3D. I hate it when writers wonder which characters should be 3D. Evwery last character in a story should be 3D. If not, they aren't characters at at all, they're just props.

I don't even like character driver versus plot driven. Good writers do both at the same time. There's no reason not to do so.

painkillers
01-01-2010, 08:48 PM
That's not how I would put it. Every use of language is supposed to carry meaning by definition. I'd go so far as to say that there is nothing without meaning (because either everything has meaning or nothing has). But we clearly have a different understanding of the meaning of "meaning".

I guess what you want to say is that you prefer Hogfather because it comes across as less pretentious. Fair enough. To me, His Dark Materials did not come across as particularly pretentious either (it had battles and romance and mystery and suspense and all other ingredients of a good fantasy romp, so it did not exactly read like a philosophical treatise; but I guess it did have a more serious tone) - but that's admittedly very subjective. So, agreed - no real argument there.

My problem with HDM is the Amber Spyglass, but I am actually all ranted out about how that damn book needed an editor (preferably one that understood how evolution works :D). Yeah, meaning is such a subjective word that using it in a post may obscure your mean...err...point.

painkillers
01-01-2010, 08:50 PM
[QUOTE=painkillers;4432257]Different definitions of deep. I was talking about symbolism etc, because I don't see why you would write character driven fiction without going deeply into their personalities, motivations, and so on. You may not tell all, and leave stuff unwritten, but it should be there all the same. Every character should be 3d (god how i hate that dimensional stuff when talking about characters) by the last draft, even the one line -- or no line -- wonders.



We sure agree on the 3D. I hate it when writers wonder which characters should be 3D. Evwery last character in a story should be 3D. If not, they aren't characters at at all, they're just props.

I don't even like character driver versus plot driven. Good writers do both at the same time. There's no reason not to do so.

Abso--bloody--lutely. If something is a character study then it ain't a story.

Maxinquaye
01-01-2010, 08:55 PM
And I agree with the general tenor that writing should be fun. It's such a frivolous activity in the first place, if you don't take at least some kind of pleasure in it, there hardly will be enough benefits to justify that particular use of time.


Whoa! Frivolous? :)

What makes you think I have any choice?

If I worked for money, I'd certainly earn more laying pipe in some of my relative's firms...

I have a need to write. If I don't I think I'll go mad. Honest.

Sometimes I think I have a weird form of schizophrenia coupled with a compulsive obsessive disorder. :) I need to pour out my imaginary friends onto paper.

I've got no choice in the matter. :D

painkillers
01-01-2010, 09:01 PM
Yup, no writy make Painkillers a very grumpy ranty boy/man/maturing at his own pace.

Writing keeps me sane and balanced, though generally distracted and possibly antisocial. Swings and roundabouts, see?

MGraybosch
01-03-2010, 01:19 AM
Yup, no writy make Painkillers a very grumpy ranty boy/man/maturing at his own pace.

Not being able to write makes me stabbier than Hugo Stiglitz in a basement full of drunk Nazis.

sohalt
01-03-2010, 02:10 AM
Whoa! Frivolous?

Maybe I should have mentioned my firm belief that from a certain point of view basically everything can be seen as frivolous.

The Otter
01-03-2010, 02:33 AM
I have the same kind of issues, though for me it's more like writing what I want to write verses what I think has a chance at getting published or read by a wider audience. A lot of the subject matter I find interesting is stuff that probably no one else cares about and therefore, I fear, won't be marketable. But I do want other people to read my work, because I believe writing is an act of communication and writing something that no one will ever read is unfulfilling.

I think we all have to find that balance. Maybe there are some writers who can write purely for their own private pleasure, but I think most of us want to be read and appreciated by other people. Ultimately, though, if you don't enjoy writing, there's no point in doing it. I mean, the monetary rewards are sporadic at best, there isn't a whole lot of recognition or respect in it (unless you're at the very tippy-top.) If writers weren't in love with their own craft, they'd go insane.

Maybe some of us are insane anyway, heh.

painkillers
01-06-2010, 02:40 AM
I prefer unsane to insane, but yup no argument there The Otter.

DWSTXS
01-06-2010, 03:53 AM
Everytime I come across this question, I am reminded of the Jack London novel, Martin Eden. It is a great story that perfectly illustrates the dichotomy that writers face. Which is, to write what you know and love, or to write whatever is selling.

painkillers
01-06-2010, 05:20 AM
The proble with being more comfortable in the long form is that you actually have to try and work out what will be sellling two years from now. Which is pointless, so I pretty much write what i like. It is mostly action and adventure stuff anyway (no, that is not a subgenre. That is just a description of the kinds of plots and chars I like. Adventure fiction as a subgenre, sheesh i almost had a cow.) so hopefully i will find a market with people that like that sort of stuff.