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ColoradoGuy
12-24-2009, 07:37 AM
. . . apparently not when it comes to swiping books. I ran across a fascinatingly arcane and, I suspect, whimsical study (here (http://www.faculty.ucr.edu/%7Eeschwitz/SchwitzPapers/EthicsBooks070801.htm)) with the wonderful title "Do Ethicists Steal More Books." The author found that ethics books are far more likely than any other philosophical works to be stolen from university libraries. The paper is a bit long, but the gist is in the brief abstract at the beginning. I suppose we should be glad that somebody wants ethics books, even ill-gotten ones.

"Some philosophers Iíve discussed these results with profess to be unsurprised and untroubled by the idea that ethicistsí moral behavior is no better than non-ethicistsí, for ethics, they say, is an abstract discipline with little connection to everyday life. But thatís not how Aristotle, Kant, and Mill see it . . . "

If he is without tenure, I do hope this piece helped its author attain that lofty state.

robeiae
12-24-2009, 08:22 PM
Okay, that's pretty good.

But there's no mention of relative costs. Naming and Necessity, for instance is a slim paparback that only runs a couple of bucks, used. Rawls' Theory of Justice--though apparently excluded--is more expensive, used and otherwise. Plus, I'd rate the latter as a "keeper," moreso than Kripke.

Still, good stuff.

Ruv Draba
12-27-2009, 04:03 PM
If he is without tenure, I do hope this piece helped its author attain that lofty state.In a related matter a colleague of mine once got a job with the university library by dint of bringing in the books he'd stolen during his undergraduate years and saying 'I know how all these were stolen; let me work for you and I'll help you stop it'.

He later moved into politics and I can think of no better destination for him. Perhaps he should be offered an ethics doctorate honoris causa.

Yeshanu
03-23-2010, 08:25 PM
Okay, that's pretty good.

But there's no mention of relative costs. Naming and Necessity, for instance is a slim paparback that only runs a couple of bucks, used. Rawls' Theory of Justice--though apparently excluded--is more expensive, used and otherwise. Plus, I'd rate the latter as a "keeper," moreso than Kripke.

Still, good stuff.

Some situational ethics going on here, eh, Rob? :D

I object! I was an ethics student, and I never stole a single book! :tongue