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View Full Version : Move Over DaVinci, it's Shakespeare's Turn



Cyia
12-22-2009, 08:45 PM
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article6964480.ece

Do we call this The Shakespeare Code?





div#related-article-links p a, div#related-article-links p a:visited { color:#06c; } Three mysterious signatures on pages of parchment bound in leather and kept under lock and key may prove the theory that William Shakespeare was a secret Catholic who spent his “lost years” in Italy.



An exhibition at the Venerable English College, the seminary in Rome for English Catholic priests, has revealed cryptic names in its guest books for visiting pilgrims, suggesting that the playwright sought refuge there.





Imagine the movie: Tom Hanks can star as an unassuming scholar type who discovers these 3 "secret signatures" and goes on a quest across Europe to prove the conspiracy to cover it up throughout history! So, who has Dan Brown's e-mail...

Jamesaritchie
12-22-2009, 11:01 PM
Good grief!

IceCreamEmpress
12-22-2009, 11:11 PM
The "Shakespeare was a secret Catholic" theory has been around since the 18th century, and there is much better evidence than this ("Shfordus" means "Shakespeare from Stratford"? Really?) to support it.

Also, while I'm being cranky, Leonardo didn't have a last name. "da Vinci" was a cognomen; calling Leonardo da Vinci "da Vinci" is like calling Eric the Red "the Red".

Phaeal
12-22-2009, 11:14 PM
I always just called him "Yo, Red." But we went way back.

JoNightshade
12-22-2009, 11:19 PM
Silly.

BenPanced
12-22-2009, 11:41 PM
Imagine the movie: Tom Hanks can star as an unassuming scholar type who discovers these 3 "secret signatures" and goes on a quest across Europe to prove the conspiracy to cover it up throughout history! So, who has Dan Brown's e-mail...
Meanwhile, Gwynneth Paltrow and Joseph Fiennes can fall in love all over again! It'll be a sequel within a movie within a movie wrapped in an enigma surrounded by a riddle and covered in phyllo dough with spinach and feta cheese! Or something.

waylander
12-22-2009, 11:53 PM
Also, while I'm being cranky, Leonardo didn't have a last name. "da Vinci" was a cognomen; calling Leonardo da Vinci "da Vinci" is like calling Eric the Red "the Red".

Leonardo of Vinci - Vinci is a small town in Tuscany

BenPanced
12-23-2009, 01:16 AM
Other Leonardos must have gotten the wrong mail a lot, I'm guessing...

IceCreamEmpress
12-23-2009, 01:59 AM
Leonardo of Vinci - Vinci is a small town in Tuscany

Yes. It's not a last name, though. It's a cognomen, like "the Red," only it means "from Vinci."

This is confusing because many cognomens became last names as history wore on ("de Lafayette" and so forth), but Leonardo did not have a last name.

Shadow_Ferret
12-23-2009, 02:29 AM
Maybe we should take up a collection and buy Leonardo a last name.

Anyway, you learn something new every day. I didn't know da Vinci wasn't his last name and I'd never heard the word cognomen before.

CACTUSWENDY
12-23-2009, 02:59 AM
And hook Brown up with King and add about 60+ more folks and all their details, plus a couple of dogs, (you get to see what they think too), and add about 250 extra pages of type and I bet you have a best seller.

Stlight
12-23-2009, 04:25 AM
Yes. It's not a last name, though. It's a cognomen, like "the Red," only it means "from Vinci."

This is confusing because many cognomens became last names as history wore on ("de Lafayette" and so forth), but Leonardo did not have a last name.


Why not? Was he a natural child?

IceCreamEmpress
12-23-2009, 05:12 AM
Why not? Was he a natural child?

Yes.

painkillers
12-24-2009, 01:09 AM
Sorry, Natural child? I am not sure what that means.

As for Shakespear. Everybody knows it was Kit Marlowe working for the papacy to destabalise Britain and lead it into civil war. It worked too, only a hundred years later. They say the new model army went into battle crying, "There's something rotten in the heart of Denmark."

(The natural child question is real the rest not so much)

IceCreamEmpress
12-24-2009, 01:15 AM
Sorry, Natural child? I am not sure what that means.

His parents weren't married to each other.

painkillers
12-24-2009, 01:27 AM
Ah, right, the other words for that ain't PC any more then. I can see why to be honest, but i had never heard it before. Cool, good to know.

Stlight
12-24-2009, 01:37 AM
Natural child is the Renaissance term for it, which is why I used it. ;)


ETA wink because it my post sounded snotty when I re-read it. didn't mean it that way. honest.

painkillers
12-24-2009, 03:48 AM
Natural child is the Renaissance term for it, which is why I used it. ;)


ETA wink because it my post sounded snotty when I re-read it. didn't mean it that way. honest.

I didn't read it that way, honest.:)

And natural child being the renaissance term is even cooler