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View Full Version : Anyone else trying to save the world?



kaitie
12-15-2009, 01:13 PM
Hi guys. If there's already a thread like this sorry. I didn't bother to look. :tongue

Anyway, I've just been listening to the (actually rather discouraging) news coming out of the Copenhagen summit. On one hand, it's awesome to see so many countries around the world hoping to get the 350ppm number set as the limit. I was really excited when I saw that. On the other, it looks like it's going to fail miserably, and chances are America isn't going to institute nearly what we need.

I can't say I'm all that surprised, all things considered. I've been hopefully but kind of expecting it to turn out like the Kyoto Protocol where America and some other big nations don't sign, and the ones who do aren't able to meet their quotas. On the other hand, maybe people are really starting to see that we're going to have some major, incredibly awful changes happening if we don't do something, and that's a good thing. :)

Anyway, I just wanted to ask if anyone else has made changes in their lives to try to help change things? What are things you haven't really done but want to? Maybe as a sort of environmental New Year's resolution or something. :)

A couple of weeks ago, I caught a sale on light bulbs and replaced the ones in my house with the energy efficient ones. It's pretty awesome, too, because the old bulb in my entrance was really dim and hardly worked at all, and now I can actually see! Woohoo!

I also try to make my own tea and carry a water bottle, though the past couple of weeks I keep forgetting, so I'm going to have to start doing it again. I'm almost afraid to open the bottle lol. I imagine it's probably all moldy and gross now. :tongue

I think I've been really amazed living in Japan how much I can do without. In the summer, for instance, I hardly ever turn on the a/c and just open the windows. Before I would have balked at the idea of not having it on if it was over eighty lol. I also hang all my clothes to dry as I don't have a clothes drier, and I've been amazed at how easy it is and plan to keep doing it when I go back to America. I also have very limited electricity and can't run two appliances at once, which has really made me recognize not only how little I really need, but also how much I used to use without even thinking about it. It's definitely been an eye opening experience.

Silent Rob
12-15-2009, 04:01 PM
I'm not exactly business-minded myself but surely whoever gets in first and starts inventing viable alternative fuels etc is going to make a mint at some point. I think it's very sad that everything comes down to money, but surely there is an economic incentive to deal with the problems on the (not so very far away) horizon.

I also have energy saving bulbs, recycle, compost etc. BUT I also drive to work everyday. Sometimes the infrastructure isn't set up to allow you to make really substantial changes very easily. I hope all that changes.

I want to see more monorails.

ad_lucem
12-15-2009, 07:56 PM
I think it's kind of a misconception that the world needs saving. The earth will do fine without us and never notice when we've gone. It's the humans that need the saving, it's just that most don't notice it.

But, we are using CFLs and recycling and whatnot.

Shadow_Ferret
12-15-2009, 08:05 PM
I'm thinking, we can't destroy the Earth, only ourselves. The Earth will recover from whatever we do it in time.

I went to the store to buy some LED bulbs for our kitchen ceiling fan. They were dim as hell, so I returned them. Really disappointed because they were expensive as hell. That'll teach me to try to save the environment.

So I'm back to littering, not separating my recyclables, and trying to waste as much energy as possible.

stephenf
12-15-2009, 11:18 PM
[QUOTE=ad_lyceum;4373254]I think it's kind of a misconception that the world needs saving. The earth will do fine without us and never notice when we've gone.

I agree.But humans will probably survive for a long time as well.The thing that is doomed is our way of life.
Most of the worlds population has now embraced the idea of unregulated and unsustainable growth. Every body wants to live like the western world.The problem is that the western worlds is 17.5% of the worlds population,but is consuming over 50% of the worlds resources .The world is set for melt down.Even if you do use energy saving light bulbs.There will be a period of global population adjustment and the survivors will adjust to the new world that they find themselves in.
The question is ,when will the adjustment start and will you or your children be one of the survivors?

ad_lucem
12-16-2009, 12:59 AM
[QUOTE=ad_lyceum;4373254]I think it's kind of a misconception that the world needs saving. The earth will do fine without us and never notice when we've gone.

I agree.But humans will probably survive for a long time as well.The thing that is doomed is our way of life.
Most of the worlds population has now embraced the idea of unregulated and unsustainable growth. Every body wants to live like the western world.The problem is that the western worlds is 17.5% of the worlds population,but is consuming over 50% of the worlds resources .The world is set for melt down.Even if you do use energy saving light bulbs.There will be a period of global population adjustment and the survivors will adjust to the new world that they find themselves in.
The question is ,when will the adjustment start and will you or your children be one of the survivors?

Ugh, I will refrain from getting into any discussion that involves neomalthusian logic. Ehrlich wrote the population bomb how many years ago?

I've seen peak oil mental meanderings and where they lead. I know a guy who renounced modern society and toddled off to live out his golden years as an "anarcho-primitive". We'll see how well that plays when arthritis and the other infirmities of old age catch up.

More power to him, I guess, but I'll pass.

The best answers to the problem probably lie in a mix of conservation and innovation--not in some luddite daydream of a World Made By Hand or post-apocalypse Mad Max or "The Road" style demise.

My least favorite uncle nearly died in the London fog/Great Smog of 1952. So far as I know, thanks to changes in human behavior they haven't had another one.

We're not doomed.

ejaycee
12-16-2009, 01:12 AM
Agreed that the earth will recover from what we've done. But I've heard people use this as an excuse for keeping doing what we're doing. We're taking too many down with us, and it'll be one helluva recovery.

In my opinion, the human race—as a whole—will never accept that there has to be change. There may be some few, but throughout history they've been dismissed without a thought, or only just humoured. Corporations don't want to cut down on carbon emissions, they want to earn as much money as possible.

And how many of you would be willing to give up your car, your computer, your power to your home? The way I see it, even if Copenhagen goes for the best, that's the only way it can really be helped. Otherwise it's a choice between going quickly, or going a little slower.

/depressingness.

ad_lucem
12-16-2009, 01:18 AM
Agreed that the earth will recover from what we've done. But I've heard people use this as an excuse for keeping doing what we're doing. We're taking too many down with us, and it'll be one helluva recovery.

In my opinion, the human race—as a whole—will never accept that there has to be change. There may be some few, but throughout history they've been dismissed without a thought, or only just humoured. Corporations don't want to cut down on carbon emissions, they want to earn as much money as possible.

And how many of you would be willing to give up your car, your computer, your power to your home? The way I see it, even if Copenhagen goes for the best, that's the only way it can really be helped. Otherwise it's a choice between going quickly, or going a little slower.

/depressingness.

Cheer up :) Polution and energy problems have been with humanity a lot longer than you might think. We used to dump fecal matter into our own drinking supply, afterall.

Things can get better. As for bringing up the living standard of the non-Western world--that's not necessarily going to kill the planet. In fact, it might lead to a safer and more verdant world.

Just a thought.

Not saying there isn't work to be done, just that it isn't impossible and people have made great leaps in the past.

stephenf
12-16-2009, 02:02 PM
[QUOTE=ad_lucem;4374632][QUOTE=stephenf;4374203]

Ugh, I will refrain from getting into any discussion that involves neomalthusian logic. Ehrlich wrote the population bomb how many years ago?

The theory is ,eventually , the population will grow to a point were it can't be sustained .Are you saying that ,eventually ,that theory will become invalid?

My least favorite uncle nearly died in the London fog/Great Smog of 1952. So far as I know, thanks to changes in human behavior they haven't had another one.

That is true.But it is also true that the population in 1952 was 2.500.000.00.And to day it is 6.500.000.000.

I doesn't mater what I believe or Indeed what you believe .The world has it's own dynamic that is not controllable.
However, I do like to understand the world I live in and know something about the people that live in it.

Zoombie
12-16-2009, 02:28 PM
Hey, Lucem, you're not the only one tired of neoluddites, neomethusalists, and so on and so forth.

I'm pretty upbeat about the future of the world myself.

Mostly cause I'm a believe in the technological singularity, or something similar to that, so I'm pretty sure our ability to innovate and build new methods of sustaining ourselves with increase exponentially, along with all our other forms of technological progress. I mean, anyone else notice how we've changed more in the past century than we ever have. Ever?

If this rate of change and progression keeps going at the rate it has been going at, who knows what new wonders and horrors we'll invent.

It'll be exciting!

As for saving our way of life...eeeh, its got a shelf life anyway. Within the next hundred years, we'll be living in a world so much better and richer than this one that people will look back and think, "How the hell did people live back then without VR, nanoreplicaters and gene-splicing?"