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uprising
12-15-2009, 01:00 AM
Uprising Media Group is currently accepting queries for novel length fiction.

We're a startup publisher founded by veteran software engineers, television producers and online marketing experts focused on developing new fiction and select non-fiction, primarily for digital distribution.

Our first set of titles will be released in Summer of 2010. Our titles will be released on the Kindle, Sony Reader, B&N Nook along with special Rich Mobile Editions for the iPhone and Android that feature original video content bundled with text. We will also release all titles on trade paperback for traditional distribution. Our focus is on electronic and viral marketing as a cost effective tool to develop a fan base for new writers.

Unlike traditional publishers, we also give our authors a much higher percentage of gross sales.

We are interested in books stuck in the blind spots of traditional publishing: cross-genre novels, etc. We're especially interested in series that cater to a technically savvy readership such as fantasy and science fiction. We will consider most fiction genres other than horror or erotica and within other genres we have a general aversion to sexually explicit material. We'll consider non-fiction memoir and biography, especially if it's funny. We also have a special place in our heart for political fiction. We're looking for strong literary characteristics in all submissions regardless of genre -- we're not looking for pulp genre novels.

We are not necessarily interested in series exclusively, but we do have a preference for prolific authors. Developing a new author is expensive, time consuming and can often take years to yield results. We prefer authors who can reliably produce new work every 12 to 18 months. If you have a drawer full of completed manuscripts, please let us know in your initial query.

You can learn more about us and review our submission guidelines by visiting our web site at http://www.uprisingmediagroup.com (http://www.uprisingmediagroup.com/).

Eleanor Bennet
Editorial Assistant
Uprising Media Group

DarkDesireX
12-15-2009, 09:58 PM
Does an aversion to sexually explicit material include romance?

uprising
12-16-2009, 09:20 PM
DarkDesireX:

No, we're all for romance. We just appreciate the difference between Romance and Erotica. As long as the love scenes in a Romance book aren't over the top gratuitous and are well balanced by equally creative attention to character, plot and theme, we're open to it.

DarkDesireX
12-17-2009, 02:23 AM
That's wonderful! If that's the case I'll be taking a look at your site.

Unimportant
12-17-2009, 04:04 AM
I went to your website, but I couldn't find out any more about you -- ("you" meaning who the owners and staff are and what their backgrounds and industry experience is). I must be having a clueless day. Could you point me to the section of the webpage that has info about the staff, please? And if possible, also, where I can find info about your forthcoming titles and who you distribute through? Thanks!

uprising
12-17-2009, 06:52 AM
We're keeping a low profile until our first list is put together and our focus is on building the authors as brands, not the imprint. I can assure you that you haven't heard of any of us and our publishing credentials would probably not impress you (though our technology and marketing experience might).

We're in the process of working out terms with a distributor and when that process is far enough along, we'll make an appropriate announcement. The same applies to our first set of titles. We'll have more information on that front in early 2010.

Unimportant
12-17-2009, 10:37 AM
Uprising, perhaps you're not aware of it, but advertising for submissions on Absolute Write isn't keeping a low profile. It's more like putting your name up a million blinking neon lights! This place has over ten thousand author-members, and probably a hundred thousand non-members who scan the board looking for markets. And so now, of course, we're all wanting to know if this will be a good place for us to submit our works.... which is why we're asking about contracted authors and distribution and industry experience.

Without wanting to crank your profile to uncomfortably high levels -- can you give us a bit more info as to why should an author choose Uprising rather than any other press?

uprising
12-17-2009, 07:38 PM
I realize that we're new and some people may be wary of submitting to us at this juncture -- and that's okay. Don't submit right now. Submit a year from now when you've had a chance to evaluate us and our titles. Of course by then our slush pile will be much larger, but it's perfectly reasonable to wait.

We don't want to talk about who we are as individuals because it would more than likely invite further scrutiny of who we are as individuals -- which would more than likely hurt our feelings and I know the nice people on AW don't want that. What you want to know is whether or not we're for real and whether or not we're scam artists. Unfortunately, people like Barbara Bauer are still at large and this kind of paranoia is perfectly justified.

For openers, our acquisitions and compensation policies are similar to most of the major publishers. We pay a small advance and then quarterly royalties after that. We'll never ask an author for money ever.

Another concern -- and one I would have if I were a writer -- would be taking a risk on an unknown publisher and tying up the rights to your work with some risky startup that might not be around in a year. After all, independent publishers are a dime a dozen. To address that issue, all our contracts have rights reversion clauses if we shut our doors or fail to sell a negotiable number of copies or reach a certain revenue target. So, if you sign with us and we can't sell your book or we go out of business, rights will revert back to you.

Oh, and as for us as individuals, if we get to the point where we'd like to acquire your manuscript, the next thing we'll want to do is meet you in person. This will give you a chance to meet some of the team, check out the vibe and figure out if you'd be comfortable working with us. Now, we have our own selfish reasons for doing this. The development of viral videos, mini-documentaries about a book's subject matter, video interviews with the writer are absolutely crucial to our marketing strategy and as extra content for rich mobile editions. (In fact, one of our key team members is a veteran producer who's worked on documentaries for A&E, Food Network, Discovery Channel, etc.) We need to know if our authors are well suited for that kind of PR campaign. If you can't give a good interview, come across as unlikable or we think you can't hold your own at a book event, we'll have to think much harder about whether or not to acquire your manuscript. After all, we're making a major financial commitment when we acquire a manuscript. It took time to write it. It takes real money to sell it.

As for why you should submit to us and not another publisher, I wouldn't frame the question exactly that way. You should submit to everyone you think might be interested in your work. If you have an offer from us and an offer from Random House, even we're going to tell you to take the Random House offer. That being said, what makes us unique is our approach to marketing and distribution. We feel that the major publishers are largely resistant to the way the Kindle has changed publishing. Jeff Bezos (the CEO of Amazon) recently told his employees that Amazon has sold 48 Kindle editions for every 100 print editions sold this holiday season. (Someone told us this in the elevator at Amazon, so consider the source.) An official statistic is that electronic editions (Kindle, eBook, etc) are up 300% year-on-year. The publishing business is scrambling -- mostly to put a stop to it until they can figure out how to react.

What makes us different is that we're interested in embracing this trend instead of fighting it -- and we know how to sell things online. When online marketing tools are married up with the instant gratification provided by direct electronic distribution, new and exciting things are possible. When someone wants to buy a book, they don't have to remember to go to the book store, then remember to buy it once they get there (if the bookstore has it in stock). They are now able to buy and start reading the book within seconds of becoming interested in the book -- in whatever format they want it in. We'll be handling distribution for the Kindle, Sony Reader, B&N Nook and other readers that support the ePub format ourselves and through partners in some cases. Our production team will be producing special mobile editions for distribution through iTunes and Android Marketplace. Those of you familiar with the work of ScrollMotion will have an idea about what we're talking about. But, we're not just an eBook publisher. Although we do not release books on hardcover (we think the $25 price point turns too many people away and makes it difficult to launch new authors), all books will be released on trade paperback. Bookstores will be able to order titles through one of the major distributors. We can't tell you which one yet, because we're still working out the details, but we can tell you that much of the internal discussion at Uprising revolves around the benefits of distributors that also provides sales support and the ones that only provide wholesale distribution.

Hopefully that's sufficient detail for the moment. If you have any specific questions, feel free to pass them along.

Unimportant
12-17-2009, 09:45 PM
Oh, and as for us as individuals, if we get to the point where we'd like to acquire your manuscript, the next thing we'll want to do is meet you in person... (snip)... If you can't give a good interview, come across as unlikable or we think you can't hold your own at a book event, we'll have to think much harder about whether or not to acquire your manuscript.

Wow.

Yeah, that's something you'll probably want to make clear in your submission guidelines, as it's a rather unusual request and is likely to deter at least some authors.

When you say "meet in person" do you mean face to face? Your website is registered to an address on an island in the Portuguese achipelago. I doubt too many authors will want to fly to the middle of the Atlantic ocean to meet with you.

uprising
12-17-2009, 09:55 PM
We do mean face to face and you'll find this is not that unusual, even in traditional publishing -- particularly for non-fiction. The media is critical to marketing books and you need writers who can take proper advantage of that. Sure, it will deter some authors, probably the ones who don't want to do interviews or travel. That's a perfectly legit lifestyle for a writer, but it doesn't dovetail well with our marketing strategy.

We opted for anonymous domain registration in order to avoid getting spam. You'll also find this isn't that unusual either. I assure you, we are not in Portugal. ;)

Unimportant
12-17-2009, 10:23 PM
Uprising, thanks for clarifying that.

I may have missed the info, and if I did, I apologise, but where are you located? I'm asking because if you are in, say, upstate New York, it won't be feasible for Australian or Japanese authors to submit to you as a face-to-face meeting would involve a substantial financial committment. AW has members from all over the world.

I appreciate the time you've taken to come here and answer our questions.

uprising
12-17-2009, 10:30 PM
Editorial and production is in Seattle. PR and Marketing is in Los Angeles. I wouldn't worry too much about the travel aspect. If we get to that point with an author we don't already have a relationship with, who goes where is up for discussion.

Old Hack
12-21-2009, 12:46 PM
Uprising, I'm interested: do you have bookstore distribution for the books that you publish? Or are you planning on relying solely on online listings and special orders to sell your books?

HapiSofi
12-22-2009, 12:13 AM
Uprising Media Group is currently accepting queries for novel length fiction.

We're a startup publisher founded by veteran software engineers, television producers and online marketing experts focused on developing new fiction and select non-fiction, primarily for digital distribution.

You don't have any experience publishing books? Does it not occur to you that it might be a good idea to acquire some?

Otherwise, what you're doing is the equivalent of assuming that reinventing the wheel will magically solve all of the auto industry's current problems with emissions and safety standards. You're also soliciting authors to let you use their books in pursuit of this project.


Our first set of titles will be released in Summer of 2010. Our titles will be released on the Kindle, Sony Reader, B&N Nook along with special Rich Mobile Editions for the iPhone and Android that feature original video content bundled with text.
That could be useful for nonfiction.


We will also release all titles on trade paperback for traditional distribution.
What do you mean by "traditional distribution"? Do you have a distribution deal that will put copies of your books onto bookstore shelves? This is an important question.


Our focus is on electronic and viral marketing as a cost effective tool to develop a fan base for new writers.
It may be a cost-effective way to do marketing, but it's not an effective way to sell books. It's especially ineffective if what you're trying to sell is fiction. No one cares about the writer before they care about the book. No one cares what you say about the book before they have a copy of it (or a substantial sample of its text) in hand.


Unlike traditional publishers, we also give our authors a much higher percentage of gross sales.
Your syntax is broken. Could you please just tell us what percentage of gross sales you intend to pay your authors?


We are interested in books stuck in the blind spots of traditional publishing: cross-genre novels, etc.
That's not a blind spot; that's an area where it's difficult and tricky to sell books. For instance, it's a lot harder to get mystery readers to read a book with SF content than it is to get SF readers to read a book with mystery content. The overlap between romance and SF/fantasy gets very complicated. Et cetera.


We're especially interested in series that cater to a technically savvy readership such as fantasy and science fiction.
Do you imagine there's a backlog of high-quality SF and fantasy that appeals to a "technically savvy readership," but has inexplicably failed to find a publisher?

There isn't.

I don't think you know what you're doing.


We will consider most fiction genres other than horror or erotica and within other genres we have a general aversion to sexually explicit material.
Too bad. Horror and erotica could use some marketing help.


We'll consider non-fiction memoir and biography, especially if it's funny.
Good. There's never enough funny in this world.


We also have a special place in our heart for political fiction.
If as much political fiction got published as romance, it would be divided into at least as many micro-categories.


We're looking for strong literary characteristics in all submissions regardless of genre -- we're not looking for pulp genre novels.
If you think you're likely to get pulp genre novels, you haven't been reading slush. Pulp's sturdy prose and straightforward action would be an improvement on most slush manuscripts. They aren't unpublished because they're unambitious; they're unpublished because they're unreadable.


We are not necessarily interested in series exclusively, but we do have a preference for prolific authors.
You think you're going to have that much choice?


Developing a new author is expensive, time consuming and can often take years to yield results.
True.


We prefer authors who can reliably produce new work every 12 to 18 months. If you have a drawer full of completed manuscripts, please let us know in your initial query.
It is easier to develop an author who can produce a book a year. However, soliciting authors who've accumulated a heap of unpublished novels is unlikely to generate a successful publishing program.


You can learn more about us and review our submission guidelines by visiting our web site at http://www.uprisingmediagroup.com.

Eleanor Bennet
Editorial Assistant
Uprising Media Group
You shouldn't be trying to drive traffic to a sparse, uninformative website. It wastes everyone's time.

HapiSofi
12-22-2009, 12:29 AM
We're keeping a low profile until our first list is put together

Why? Starting up a new publishing company is hard enough as it is. Why deprive yourself of potential submissions from authors who want to know what kind of talent and expertise you bring to the table?


our focus is on building the authors as brands, not the imprint.
You can't. All you can do is acquire, package, and promote books. If enough readers like an author's books, they'll be ready to take an interest in the author. Trying to start by promoting the author is doing things backward. It won't work.


I can assure you that you haven't heard of any of us and our publishing credentials would probably not impress you (though our technology and marketing experience might).
IMO, it doesn't matter what you know about technology or marketing if you don't know how to apply that expertise to the problems of publishing books. However, if you think your background is sufficient to get you started, why not let your prospective authors know what it is?


We're in the process of working out terms with a distributor and when that process is far enough along, we'll make an appropriate announcement. The same applies to our first set of titles. We'll have more information on that front in early 2010.
If I had an unpublished novel, why would any of that make me think that your company would be the right place to send it?

veinglory
12-22-2009, 12:58 AM
If I had an unpublished novel, why would any of that make me think that your company would be the right place to send it?

Exactly.

HapiSofi
12-22-2009, 01:33 AM
I realize that we're new and some people may be wary of submitting to us at this juncture -- and that's okay. Don't submit right now. Submit a year from now when you've had a chance to evaluate us and our titles. Of course by then our slush pile will be much larger, but it's perfectly reasonable to wait.

The size of the slush pile doesn't determine the author's chances of getting published. If they've written an engaging book that people want to buy and read, the odds that they'll get published are very good. If they haven't, the odds that they'll get published aren't very good. Therefore, it makes sense to wait and see before sending work to Uprising.


We don't want to talk about who we are as individuals because it would more than likely invite further scrutiny of who we are as individuals
Yes. That is the point of the exercise.


-- which would more than likely hurt our feelings and I know the nice people on AW don't want that.
Scrutiny would hurt your feelings. Check.

Have you given much thought to what it's like to work in publishing?


What you want to know is whether or not we're for real and whether or not we're scam artists. Unfortunately, people like Barbara Bauer are still at large and this kind of paranoia is perfectly justified.

For openers, our acquisitions and compensation policies are similar to most of the major publishers. We pay a small advance and then quarterly royalties after that. We'll never ask an author for money ever.
Is there some reason you can't just quote percentages?


Another concern -- and one I would have if I were a writer -- would be taking a risk on an unknown publisher and tying up the rights to your work with some risky startup that might not be around in a year. After all, independent publishers are a dime a dozen. To address that issue, all our contracts have rights reversion clauses if we shut our doors or fail to sell a negotiable number of copies or reach a certain revenue target. So, if you sign with us and we can't sell your book or we go out of business, rights will revert back to you.
Congratulations. You pass one of the basic tests for basic contracts.


Oh, and as for us as individuals, if we get to the point where we'd like to acquire your manuscript, the next thing we'll want to do is meet you in person.
The "meet authors in person" thing has been a very effective distraction, but it doesn't tell us who you are as individuals or as a company.


This will give you a chance to meet some of the team, check out the vibe and figure out if you'd be comfortable working with us.
You've skipped over the part where the writer decides that you have the ability and experience to successfully run a publishing company, and sends you his or her manuscript, and gone on to the part where your company judges the writer.

We need to know who you are and what you've done.


Now, we have our own selfish reasons for doing this. The development of viral videos, mini-documentaries about a book's subject matter, video interviews with the writer are absolutely crucial to our marketing strategy and as extra content for rich mobile editions. (In fact, one of our key team members is a veteran producer who's worked on documentaries for A&E, Food Network, Discovery Channel, etc.) We need to know if our authors are well suited for that kind of PR campaign. If you can't give a good interview, come across as unlikable or we think you can't hold your own at a book event, we'll have to think much harder about whether or not to acquire your manuscript. After all, we're making a major financial commitment when we acquire a manuscript. It took time to write it. It takes real money to sell it.
Translation: "We own several hammers, and we think that driving nails is absolutely crucial to modern book publishing, especially the extra nails, drywall screws, carpet tacks, and ornamental brass drawer-pulls we drive into our rich hardware editions. (In fact, one of our key team members is a finish carpenter who used to work at a Home Depot.) We need to know if our authors are well suited for nail-driving sessions, since nail-driving is what we know how to do."


As for why you should submit to us and not another publisher, I wouldn't frame the question exactly that way. You should submit to everyone you think might be interested in your work. If you have an offer from us and an offer from Random House, even we're going to tell you to take the Random House offer. That being said, what makes us unique is our approach to marketing and distribution.
Unique isn't the point. Effective is.


We feel that the major publishers are largely resistant to the way the Kindle has changed publishing.
Major publishers have been scrambling to cope with electronic publishing for years now. Vast amounts of analysis. Constantly refining policies. Serious difference of opinion. More analysis.


Jeff Bezos (the CEO of Amazon) recently told his employees that Amazon has sold 48 Kindle editions for every 100 print editions sold this holiday season. (Someone told us this in the elevator at Amazon, so consider the source.)
Really don't care about that citation. Where there's no context, there can be no interpretation.


An official statistic is that electronic editions (Kindle, eBook, etc) are up 300% year-on-year.
Official from what source? What are the actual figures, and how do they compare to overall sales?


The publishing business is scrambling -- mostly to put a stop to it until they can figure out how to react.
Nope. If you think that's what's going on, you don't know enough to be starting a publishing company.


What makes us different is that we're interested in embracing this trend instead of fighting it --
You are arrogant ignoramuses, and will fail. Authors should not entrust their books to you.


and we know how to sell things online.
Again: who are you, and what's your background?


When online marketing tools are married up with the instant gratification provided by direct electronic distribution, new and exciting things are possible. When someone wants to buy a book, they don't have to remember to go to the book store, then remember to buy it once they get there (if the bookstore has it in stock). They are now able to buy and start reading the book within seconds of becoming interested in the book -- in whatever format they want it in.
But enough about Jeff Bezos. What are your plans?


We'll be handling distribution for the Kindle, Sony Reader, B&N Nook and other readers that support the ePub format ourselves and through partners in some cases.
No. You will not be handling their distribution. You will be distributing your titles through their channels. Please try to talk like someone who's put in some time working with distributors.


Our production team will be producing special mobile editions for distribution through iTunes and Android Marketplace. Those of you familiar with the work of ScrollMotion will have an idea about what we're talking about. But, we're not just an eBook publisher. Although we do not release books on hardcover (we think the $25 price point turns too many people away and makes it difficult to launch new authors),
A $25 price point will sell if the buyer wants that book. Any higher than that is where you start seeing real price resistance on books by unfamiliar authors.


all books will be released on trade paperback.
In trade paperback. Please try to talk like someone who's got experience in publishing or bookselling.


Bookstores will be able to order titles through one of the major distributors.
Hold it. Do you mean that bookstores will be able to order individual copies, or do you mean they'll receive regular shipments of whole-copy-returnable books? As I noted earlier, this is a very important question.


We can't tell you which one yet, because we're still working out the details, but we can tell you that much of the internal discussion at Uprising revolves around the benefits of distributors that also provides sales support and the ones that only provide wholesale distribution.
You don't know yet? You haven't decided?

You guys aren't just reinventing the wheel. You're arguing about whether it has three corners or four.

AlterEgox5
01-10-2010, 07:53 AM
I'm late to the party, but it doesn't seem to matter much since no one has responded since Hapi's thorough dissection of the previous posts (cheers).

I'd like to know that if they need to meet with me in order to finally decide whether or not they want to represent me, then how's that going to happen? Because I sure as heck don't have the money to spend flying to Los Angeles - especially if, for some reason, they decide they don't like me and ultimately say no.

Unimportant
01-10-2010, 09:19 AM
AlterEgo, this aspect of their business plan got discussed here: http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=165794&page=2

and their overall business plan was discussed here: http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=165808

Maryn
01-10-2010, 09:13 PM
DarkDesireX:

No, we're all for romance. We just appreciate the difference between Romance and Erotica. As long as the love scenes in a Romance book aren't over the top gratuitous and are well balanced by equally creative attention to character, plot and theme, we're open to it.In addition to the important posts by HapiSofi, this announces loudly that you don't know enough to start a business.

Point one, erotica is among the biggest sellers in electronic publishing. By refusing to consider it, you are undercutting your profit potential.

Not to mention insulting me and others.

AW has an active erotica board. Many of its authors have paid publications. All our work features "creative attention to character, plot, and theme," and I take umbrage at your blanket assumption that my work does not meet the standards of all good fiction.

Besides, Uprising would be a great imprint for slash.

Maryn, disgusted

gambit924
01-11-2010, 04:26 AM
So what's the opinion of everybody? To submit or not to submit, that is the question. What do you all think. Is it worth the risk?

Unimportant
01-11-2010, 04:38 AM
IMO: No. There are a plethora of start-up e-presses with zero track record, zero industry experience, and zero knowledge of publishing, if that's who you want to publish with. But as Uprising (or, at least, their representative here on AW) has demonstrated a really poor attitude, both publicly and privately, towards authors, I'd put them at the bottom of the list.

gambit924
01-12-2010, 12:58 AM
Right, thank you muchly.

Ladyhawke_18
01-12-2010, 10:31 PM
I'm surprised... We're writers. We should be excited that there's one more paying market in the world. Who they are as individuals doesn't matter at the moment. I feel like many of us are so accustomed to an inbox full of rejections that we're saving the editors and agents the trouble by rejecting them first!

If you're interested, SUBMIT.

You may get rejected. Cross that bridge first. THEN if you don't like the terms, no one says you've got to sign the dotted line.

AND I don't think they ever stipulated that YOU had to travel to them and that YOU had to pay for it.

Yeesh.

If your such hot stuff, as they said, submit to random house, not them.

I'm playing devil's advocate here. We do need to protect ourselves, absolutely, but it is starting to read like an attack. We're going to frighten new markets from posting here at all!

Of course, in a perfect world, the entity in the hot seat would have all the perfect answers to our questions, so by all means ask.

I just thought...dang...

stormie
01-12-2010, 10:39 PM
....AND I don't think they ever stipulated that YOU had to travel to them and that YOU had to pay for it.
....
They did originally mention that if they were considering taking a writer on, they'd want that writer to come out to CA to meet with them, face to face. They said (and I paraphrase) that it was a good way for them to know if that writer can help make the book sell. Appearances seemed to mean a lot to them. It's now down off the original post and their web site. If Harper Lee were to have been made to do that, she'd never have had To Kill A Mockingbird published. Yes, Uprising Media Group did say they'd pay the travel expenses (what exactly, I don't know).

ETA: Found this downthread from the original post here:
We do mean face to face and you'll find this is not that unusual, even in traditional publishing -- particularly for non-fiction. The media is critical to marketing books and you need writers who can take proper advantage of that. Sure, it will deter some authors, probably the ones who don't want to do interviews or travel. That's a perfectly legit lifestyle for a writer, but it doesn't dovetail well with our marketing strategy.

AlterEgox5
01-13-2010, 12:16 AM
Heh, I think I'm automatically out anyway. In terms of travel, I'm sure they plan to fly people to their location.

Except I don't fly. At all. Ever. You'd have to drug me, kidnap me, and then wake me up after the plane landed and I was on solid ground again. And even then I'd probably still be really unhappy. :e2thud:

Ladyhawke_18
01-13-2010, 12:17 AM
I may regret my little devil's advocate stance, but the feel I got is that they want to make sure you have personal hygiene and you can comfortably, pleasantly, and intelligently market your book to people.

There are people who have trouble communicating verbally. There are people who fear public speaking.

That type of person won't do well at a reading of their work or, say, on Oprah.

Am I right?

That's the spirit in which I took the face to face thing.

I mean, if a publisher wants to publish your book but they'd like to meet you first, are you going to spit in their faces and retract your submission?

Maybe you aught to just have a sit down and let them fall in love with you. After all they liked your work and you wrote it. You're obviously wonderful, full of wonderful thoughts.

When I apply to a job, I usually have to go to an interview. I've only been hired once, sight unseen. But when they call asking to interview me, I don't call them jerks and hang up on them. I dress up nice and go to the interview.

I just posted cuz I think we need to think positively every now and again.

Sunshine and care bears and all that stuff.

The cool thing is, if I did have something to submit, maybe competition would be lighter (giving me an advantage) since the majority on this thread seem to think negatively of this market.

Ladyhawke_18
01-13-2010, 12:20 AM
Heh, I think I'm automatically out anyway. In terms of travel, I'm sure they plan to fly people to their location.

Except I don't fly. At all. Ever. You'd have to drug me, kidnap me, and then wake me up after the plane landed and I was on solid ground again. And even then I'd probably still be really unhappy. :e2thud:

So we'll only see you on Oprah via remote satellite video conferencing, then.

AlterEgox5
01-13-2010, 12:23 AM
Yeah, but Uprising has to meet me first before I end up on Oprah.

Anyway, I don't intend to end up on Oprah. I seriously doubt she'd be interested in military SF. XD

Ladyhawke_18
01-13-2010, 12:27 AM
I was being facetious. It's just sad to me that you're starting out your adventure as an author limiting yourself. You're not going to travel to conferences and do special readings and book signings? EVER?

Isn't that stuff the icing on the cake?

Ladyhawke_18
01-13-2010, 12:28 AM
Maybe there's a nice train you can take to your destination.

AlterEgox5
01-13-2010, 12:34 AM
I was being facetious. It's just sad to me that you're starting out your adventure as an author limiting yourself. You're not going to travel to conferences and do special readings and book signings? EVER?

Isn't that stuff the icing on the cake?
I know. :)

Oh, I have no problem with traveling. Not at all. I'd be more than happy to go to conferences and readings and signings and all that good stuff.

I'm not just flying to it. Not unless the publishing house wants one of their authors to stroke out. :P

Unimportant
01-13-2010, 01:14 AM
Ladyhawke, the main thrust of these questions is to try and distinguish not between legit publisher versus legit publisher who cares what I look like, but between legit publisher versus black hole. Too many startups turn into black holes, where the author's manuscript disappears and languishes, unpublished or unsold, for years and years.

By reading the threads on AW about publishers that have "gone grey" (their names are in grey text on the index, indicating that they've gone out of business and, sadly, have often taken all their authors down with them) a clear pattern emerges. Startups run by people with no industry experience or knowledge go grey. Startups run by authors who couldn't sell their book to a commercial publisher and who spout off about the "evil gatekeepers" and the "elitist, snobby authors" go grey. Startups whose webpages are geared to advertise to authors go grey. Startups who claim they are going to revolutionise the publishing industry go grey. Startups who get angry and defensive when asked questions about their business plan, and whose reply is along the lines of 'how dare you question us? you should be glad there's another publisher you could submit to!" go grey....

icerose
01-13-2010, 02:37 AM
I was being facetious. It's just sad to me that you're starting out your adventure as an author limiting yourself. You're not going to travel to conferences and do special readings and book signings? EVER?

Isn't that stuff the icing on the cake?

You've obviously never been published by a bad press. It's far worse than never being published at all. Trust me on this. That's all these are designed for, to try and figure out who actually knows what the hell they're doing and who doesn't.

Ladyhawke_18
01-13-2010, 05:23 PM
I do believe they addressed the issue of what happens to the rights if they go under.

I was just stunned by how negative the thread felt. It was like the new market stepped into a den of wolves simply by posting an opportunity.

"You are arrogant ignoramuses, and will fail. Authors should not entrust their books to you."

That's not a question. It's an insult. If someone posted that directed at me, I'd be embarrassed.

There's a difference between asking questions and judging the answers to decide personally whether you will submit or not, and even leaving notes to help protect other writers and help them judge for themselves

and

you know, openly taking jabs and the like.

I'm glad this forum exists. I learn a lot here. I do want to avoid bad presses. I just think there's a polite way to talk to people.

If I'm wrong, I'm wrong.

Richard White
01-13-2010, 08:11 PM
Personally, I'd talk the same way to a friend of mine who was thinking about starting a business (say a crafts store) that they had absolutely NO experience in and were going to get people to contribute to providing material to the store (say, making quilts).

If they were underfunded, inexperienced and were taking things from people with a poorly written contract, I sure as heck would be in their face asking them what they were doing. And I would expect any of my friends to do the same to me.

Business isn't for the faint-hearted and the thin skinned. If you aren't prepared to answer the hard questions, especially if you're going to be taking other people's stuff to sell for them, then you have no business being IN business.

And publishing is a unique critter. If you have no experience, you can't just transfer in from another line of work and expect to be successful. If I wanted to be a publisher, I'd spend the time to learn the system. I'd try to get a job at one of the bigger imprints first and start making connections, seeing how a P&L is done for books (I'm pretty sure they figure it differently than my father in law did for deciding how many heads of cabbage to order for his grocery store), etc.

No, I have little patience for people who try to pull an Andy Hardy - "Hey, I've got a barn, you play guitar, let's put on a musical" only works in the movies.

Ladyhawke_18
01-14-2010, 05:21 PM
You do have a point.

uprising
01-17-2010, 07:10 AM
We're rebranding and rebooting. Gray us out.

Birol
01-17-2010, 09:00 AM
Didn't work out for ya, huh?

uprising
01-17-2010, 09:22 AM
I didn't say we were quitting, but when this thread is the number one listing on google when you search for us, the brand name's trashed and we have to rebrand.

Birol
01-17-2010, 06:29 PM
Rebranding won't make the inherent problems in your exercise go away. It's easy to blame us for your difficulties rather than actually look at what we had to say. Your group -- whatever you call yourselves next -- will still have no publishing experience and still be a bad idea for writers. Changing your name does not change that.

Birol
01-17-2010, 06:39 PM
You know, it's actually underhanded and devious that you would choose to change your name rather than fix the problems in your business. As far as publishing goes, it's another mark against you.

uprising
01-17-2010, 08:36 PM
Don't jump to conclusions about whether or not we learned something. We learned a lot. We learned that until we have a track record, we have no business reaching out to people we don't know for material. The tone was nasty, but we did try to take the advice constructively when we felt it was accurate. A lot of what we read on here, especially about the role of the author in marketing, was just plain not accurate and reflects less knowledge of publishing than we supposedly have.

Consider this...

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703414504575001271351446274.html

I think the quote from Jim Levine is very illuminating. Anyone who thinks it's the publishers job to market the book and the author has no role, even with "real" publishers, needs a reality check.

Birol
01-17-2010, 08:44 PM
Never once did I say the author didn't have a role, but again, that avoids answering the question: What publishing experience do you have? The answer is none. There is far more to publishing than getting the author's face in front of people.

It also assumes that I won't read the article you linked to, or perhaps I have no reading comprehension skills? That article is about the slush pile. Not marketing.

You're very good with the non sequitors, aren't you? It's a kind of sleight of hand with you, isn't it?

uprising
01-17-2010, 09:11 PM
Are you asking me to answer a question we've already answered? Maybe you should actually read the thread. We've admitted that we have no direct publishing industry experience. Would you like us to admit it again? Should we repeat it? Should we send a written apology to every AW member?

Our new incarnation won't be soliciting material, so no writer that doesn't have a personal relationship with us will ever have to worry about making a "mistake" publishing with us. Isn't that the corrective action you want? Do you want us to just give up entirely? And do you really think we should care what a bunch of trolls who sit around writing unicorn porn think about our business plan? This may be our first go round in the publishing business, but it's not our first foray into business or the entertainment industry. We're not going to hold a webex meeting and pitch our whole business plan. There's nothing in it for us. Seriously, who do you people think you are? It's not like Birol is secretly Stephen King.

I know from reading the bingo thread that AW's standard technique for dealing with an argument they have no defense for is to call it a cliche, so I'll skip all that. Anyway, we do have a business to run -- whether you jackals approve of how we're doing it or not -- so, if it's okay with everyone, we'd like to get back to it.

Kensington
01-18-2010, 12:19 AM
Every business -- publishers included -- had to start out new at some time. I think Uprisings, or whatever they're now calling themselves, got a bad rap here. Not called for at all.

Unimportant
01-18-2010, 12:52 AM
We're not trolls, or jackals, or producers of unicorn porn. Who do we think we are? We think -- we *know* -- that we're writers who advocate for each other.

Do we help each other avoid scammers? Yes. Do we help each other be wary of publishers who are likely to tank and take our books down with them? Yes. Do we heed the advice of AW members who are top-dog editors at top-dog publishers, such as HapiSofi? Yes. Do we cheer on new presses who have industry experience behind them, such as Angela James' recent ventures? Yes. Do we celebrate publishers who prove themselves and succeed, such as priceless1's press? Yes. Do we hope that Uprising, in its new incarnation, will succeed? Yes. Do we hope that Jeffrey David Payne's book "The Wavy Line" will become a bestseller for you? Yes. Do we worry that his book and others may be sucked into a black hole because the principals behind Uprising don't have industry knowledge and experience to the degree that AW has, over the years, found is strongly correlated with the success of a new press? Yes.

uprising
01-18-2010, 12:57 AM
Ugh, here we go again. I'm an idiot for getting sucked back into this.

Anyway, Uprising's probably dead. Who would have thought someone who edit's chain mail reference books could bring us down, but that appears to be exactly what happened.

Just gray us out. We're not taking submissions even if we aren't dead.

Medievalist
01-18-2010, 01:02 AM
We lost that book thanks to this thread. So seriously, just fuck off.

Dude, you're really making a sterling impression.

You're not only clueless about publishing, the English language, and given to sock-puppetry, you engage in abuse.

Yeah, you're a super publisher. Way to go!

You "lost the book" because you revealed your incomptence.

Medievalist
01-18-2010, 01:03 AM
Every business -- publishers included -- had to start out new at some time. I think Uprisings, or whatever they're now calling themselves, got a bad rap here. Not called for at all.

Go read the post history. He was better treated than he deserved.

Medievalist
01-18-2010, 01:08 AM
Do you want us to just give up entirely? And do you really think we should care what a bunch of trolls who sit around writing unicorn porn think about our business plan?

You know, initially, I thought you were just a naive teen. Now I think you're deliberately duplicitous.

You can't even handle basic English syntax, you have immature public tantrums, you insult volunteer unpaid staff--with a better command of English than you and a better background in publishing--and you want writers to trust you with their books?

uprising
01-18-2010, 01:52 AM
Uh, I think the whole purpose of unflouncing was to say that we actually don't expect writers to trust us with their books. We're not taking submissions anymore. We lost the first book we planned to put out along with our editor and software engineer. We may not even exist anymore. If you wanted us to shrivel up and go away, you may have gotten your wish.

Kensington
01-18-2010, 02:16 AM
I was being facetious. It's just sad to me that you're starting out your adventure as an author limiting yourself. You're not going to travel to conferences and do special readings and book signings? EVER?

Isn't that stuff the icing on the cake?

Not for everyone. Many writers, including myself, are introverts who shudder at the idea of being in the spotlight. I get my reward from the writing itself.

Medievalist
01-18-2010, 02:18 AM
Can you please shut up now?

Well, now. Aren't you a precious little snowflake!

No dude, I'm not going to "please shut up now."

Kensington
01-18-2010, 02:20 AM
We may not even exist anymore. If you wanted us to shrivel up and go away, you may have gotten your wish.

I doubt that any writer wants publishers to fail. That would be a bit self defeating.

Unimportant
01-18-2010, 02:28 AM
Med, Birol, et al -- who edits the chain mail reference books, and where can I buy them? They sound fascinating!

Medievalist
01-18-2010, 02:31 AM
Med, Birol, et al -- who edits the chain mail reference books, and where can I buy them? They sound fascinating!

Yeah, you got me. I'm still trying to parse that one.

Medievalist
01-18-2010, 02:33 AM
Not for everyone. Many writers, including myself, are introverts who shudder at the idea of being in the spotlight. I get my reward from the writing itself.

Most authors never get near the spotlight.

And if the writing is itself the reward, why on Earth bother worrying about publishers? Seems like you'd be happier just getting on with the writing?

Kensington
01-18-2010, 02:49 AM
Most authors never get near the spotlight.

And if the writing is itself the reward, why on Earth bother worrying about publishers? Seems like you'd be happier just getting on with the writing?

And that's what I do.

Birol
01-18-2010, 02:49 AM
Med, Birol, et al -- who edits the chain mail reference books, and where can I buy them? They sound fascinating!

Don't know, but I'm thinking about trying my hand at unicorn porn. I would, of course, have to give Coyote Wild first refusal. I hear their editor-in-chief loves all things unicorn.

Medievalist
01-18-2010, 02:54 AM
Don't know, but I'm thinking about trying my hand at unicorn porn. I would, of course, have to give Coyote Wild first refusal. I hear their editor-in-chief loves all things unicorn.

I hear unicorns are horny. I like the pink ones with glitter.

AW Admin
06-02-2016, 09:20 PM
There's a Bewares thread about Uprising (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?165808-Uprising-Media-Group).