PDA

View Full Version : The book no one I know will ever read.



icerose
12-06-2009, 11:22 PM
I just finished a very dark crime thriller. My Bloody Diary. The character came to me with her twisted little story and sarcastic mannerism. She's witty, funny, and deeply disturbed. Very much a psychopath. And yet she's my protagonist.

You can see a glimpse of her voice in my sigline.

I set in knowing no one I personally know would ever read it. I have family who think I need to write about skipping prancing ponies. You would think that my soul sucking house that ate my MC's family members novel at the age of twelve would make them realize I'm not a light and happy writer, but they are persistant.

I received many countless lectures over this one. They're going to have heartattacks when I write the sequel but it got me thinking. How important is it to other writers that people they know read and appreciate what they write?

Apparently it's not high on my list because I've never written anything I've really loved that even remotely appealed to any of them.

DWSTXS
12-06-2009, 11:44 PM
I just finished a very dark crime thriller. My Bloody Diary. The character came to me with her twisted little story and sarcastic mannerism. She's witty, funny, and deeply disturbed. Very much a psychopath. And yet she's my protagonist.

You can see a glimpse of her voice in my sigline.

I set in knowing no one I personally know would ever read it. I have family who think I need to write about skipping prancing ponies. You would think that my soul sucking house that ate my MC's family members novel at the age of twelve would make them realize I'm not a light and happy writer, but they are persistant.

I received many countless lectures over this one. They're going to have heartattacks when I write the sequel but it got me thinking. How important is it to other writers that people they know read and appreciate what they write?

Apparently it's not high on my list because I've never written anything I've really loved that even remotely appealed to any of them.

skipping prancing ponies? Nothing wrong with that, as long as they think of nothing but murder all day.

Ellefire
12-06-2009, 11:47 PM
sounds pretty good to me :D

san_remo_ave
12-07-2009, 12:04 AM
Not important at all that people I know will read what I write. In fact, I prefer that they don't.

icerose
12-07-2009, 12:12 AM
You guys are hilarious. I think this is the book that really hit me. They will never read what I write because of what I write about. Oh well, back to death and destruction.

Maryn
12-07-2009, 12:17 AM
Well, if we didn't have different tastes there wouldn't be menus, right? So what if those near and dear wouldn't care for it? The market clearly supports that sort of fiction, and so do I. It literally sounds like a line from something I'd buy, or already on my shelves.

I hear you about the prancing ponies writing. One woman in my critique group used to joke, "[realname], don't you ever write about anything that ends well, or has anybody happy in it?" Uh, no. What fun would that be?

Maryn, who writes sex and murder, often together

Mr. Anonymous
12-07-2009, 12:24 AM
If you don't write to please yourself, then your writing will come out soulless.

That said, there is a difference between pleasing yourself and being self-indulgent. Just because you want give us five pages of description doesn't mean readers will want to read it (ahem, Scott Lynch, AHEM.)

maxmordon
12-07-2009, 12:34 AM
I kinda know that feeling, no one around me has time or the care to read what I write... it would be the same if I burned it. But the important thing is that you wrote it, it's a part of your essence and not prancing ponies...

Matera the Mad
12-07-2009, 12:36 AM
No way I want people who think they know me reading my stuff...until after it's published--let 'em pay. TG my mother is dead.

Toothpaste
12-07-2009, 12:56 AM
icerose - I have to tell you, for the first time ever I was faced with the people who were most important to me not liking something I'd written and it hurt like heck. My parents have always championed me, have always adored my writing while being honest in their feedback at the same time. They accepted dark themes, weird sense of humour, really anything, they usually loved it.

Then, the summer before last, I sent them the first 20 000 words of my latest MS and they didn't like it. It hurt so much. I became obsessed with talking with them about it, and needing to prove to them that it was good. I didn't quit writing it. I just kept going, but it was so hard knowing my biggest fans, and biggest help (they are my alpha beta readers) didn't love it. When I gave them the final copy, they helped me edit it like usual, and a wonderful thing happened. I managed to make my dad like it by the end. Not love it, I doubt he ever will, but actually kind of like it and it was a huge coup for me.

Had he not, though, I still would have submitted it to my agent and everything. I wasn't about to not write this story, nor not seek its publication. But it was really a huge test for me, and I'm glad I finished despite their opinion.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that sometimes the people we respect and care about aren't going to love our work, and you have to decide that it's still worth having created it. Others will like what you've written, and maybe they will come around to at least respecting it. But we have to be true to ourselves. It's the only way.

ChaosTitan
12-07-2009, 01:04 AM
How important is it to other writers that people they know read and appreciate what they write?

If it mattered a whole heck of a lot, I wouldn't be published today. I'd have never written the book in my sig line, because it contains elements that some people I know (mostly family members) wouldn't like and would question me about including. But I also have very conservative family members who are very open about not supporting what I write. Oh well.

I write first for myself, and then think about the broader audience appeal. I don't write about prancing rainbow ponies, I write about darkness, violence, and survival. I also write about hope, love, and forgiveness. You can't have hope without darkness, and you can't have love without hate.

There are people, friends, in my life who've read my book and loved it, and I'm so grateful for that. After all, not every stranger who reads it is going to love it, so I can't possibly expect every person I know who reads it to love it. If they do, that's just icing. :)

wannawrite
12-07-2009, 01:16 AM
Funny, I was just thinking about that today. I have a big family, and when Demon Heart is released, I will send out a massive e-mail and I'm pretty sure that most of them will buy DH. Will they actually read it? I dunno. It's kinda weird to think of my 60 yr old uncle, sitting around reading my paranormal/time-travel romance. Especially the spicy love scenes.

Cyia
12-07-2009, 01:21 AM
My family thinks vampires are evil. I have a multi-part series. :D

dgrintalis
12-07-2009, 02:02 AM
I write dark tales (horror, but not gore fests) and a family member said, "You're too pretty to have such dark things in your head". Another relative told me she would never, ever read anything I write. I have a few other relatives I can't imagine ever reading my stuff and I'm okay with that. I didn't choose to write about dark things; they are just what comes out of the word machine in my head.

Wayne K
12-07-2009, 02:09 AM
Family always want the book for free, so F 'em.

scarletpeaches
12-07-2009, 02:14 AM
What Wayne said.

Plus, I can't stand what remains of my family anyway. I know for a fact my aunt-by-marriage would read my books because she likes the genre, so great. She'd approve, but tell me if there were parts she didn't like.

As for my (step)dad, I can't ever stop him buying a copy but if he does, I never, ever want him to tell.

But really it doesn't mean a thing whether they like my books or not. I'm not writing for them. I'm writing for me, and people who like my books. Of course I want to improve with each one but familial approval doesn't mean Jack shit because I've never had it.

icerose
12-07-2009, 03:34 AM
I really couldn't write to cater to anyone elses tastes. If I don't love it the passion isn't going to be there.

My family does support the fact that I write and are very encouraging, they simply don't like what I write. I think I just finally realized that I will most likely never write anything that any of them will want to read.

I'm okay with that, but it just struck me today. There are times though that I wish the lectures would end. "Well if you wouldn't watch those horror films." "If you wouldn't read those dark books." "If you wouldn't think those dark thoughts."

I doubt that will ever change though and that's okay too.

MGraybosch
12-07-2009, 04:07 AM
How important is it to other writers that people they know read and appreciate what they write?

I want my wife to love my work. Nobody else matters.

MGraybosch
12-07-2009, 04:10 AM
My family thinks vampires are evil. I have a multi-part series. :D

My parents can't understand why I'd have demons in a story I describe as science fantasy. Then again, they can't understand why I'd write science fantasy in the first place, as opposed to writing down their stories or researching their family history.

1. Their stories mean nothing to me, because they're not my stories.
2. I don't give a single little fucking shit about their family's history.
3. They're not really demons; my characters just don't know what else to call 'em. :)

Chumplet
12-07-2009, 04:28 AM
I let my dad read my first two books but I wouldn't allow him to read The Toast Bitches. I told him not to buy it. In my mind, it's too erotic (although the first two had sex scenes) and it crossed the line of what I want my dad to see. He's an avid reader and I'm sure he's seen it all, but from his daughter? He'll probably buy it and read it, but leave his comments to himself. I hope he respects my wishes, though...

Many of my office colleagues have bought my first two books, but I was hesitant to promote the third to them, since many scenes were 'borrowed' from real life and some characters were inspired by friends, with their permission.

However, since the setting is a similar industry to the one I work in, co-workers might get the wrong idea and think some of those wild erotic scenes actually happened. They might think the hot editor with a penchant for BDSM might really exist.

One colleague borrowed my girlfriend's copy and sat down beside me with a wicked grin on her face. She said, "I was reading your book and when I got to the part with ___'s legs in the air in the limo, I thought, 'Hey, that's me!'"

Fortunately, it seems she won't sue me. When I sell a copy to a co-worker, I tell them first, "Listen, I have to give you my standard disclaimer: THIS IS FICTION!"

I'm definitely sending Dad a copy of my latest WIP. It's much tamer.

Wayne K
12-07-2009, 04:31 AM
I let my dad read my first two books but I wouldn't allow him to read The Toast Bitches. I told him not to buy it. In my mind, it's too erotic (although the first two had sex scenes) and it crossed the line of what I want my dad to see. He's an avid reader and I'm sure he's seen it all, but from his daughter? He'll probably buy it and read it, but leave his comments to himself. I hope he respects my wishes, though...

Many of my office colleagues have bought my first two books, but I was hesitant to promote the third to them, since many scenes were 'borrowed' from real life and some characters were inspired by friends, with their permission.

However, since the setting is a similar industry to the one I work in, co-workers might get the wrong idea and think some of those wild erotic scenes actually happened. They might think the hot editor with a penchant for BDSM might really exist.

One colleague borrowed my girlfriend's copy and sat down beside me with a wicked grin on her face. She said, "I was reading your book and when I got to the part with ___'s legs in the air in the limo, I thought, 'Hey, that's me!'"

Fortunately, it seems she won't sue me. When I sell a copy to a co-worker, I tell them first, "Listen, I have to give you my standard disclaimer: THIS IS FICTION!"

I'm definitely sending Dad a copy of my latest WIP. It's much tamer.
Are they hiring?

icerose
12-07-2009, 04:44 AM
I let my dad read my first two books but I wouldn't allow him to read The Toast Bitches. I told him not to buy it. In my mind, it's too erotic (although the first two had sex scenes) and it crossed the line of what I want my dad to see. He's an avid reader and I'm sure he's seen it all, but from his daughter? He'll probably buy it and read it, but leave his comments to himself. I hope he respects my wishes, though...

I completely understand. There are some books that I'll talk about with my family, most however they never hear about. For some reason I don't think they'd appreciate a book with lines like:

"Annoying bobble headed bimbos" and "May he rest in pieces, the bastard" would go over well with my very conservative family.

PoppysInARow
12-07-2009, 07:22 AM
When I used to write, I needed people's approval. But after I got into a huge fight with my best friend/sole reader, I wrote on my own for a while, and I realized I liked what I wrote by myself. I find I love giving it to people who will have discussions with me about the plots or characters, but I usually don't let them read it till its polished.

I like having it all to myself in those beginning stages. That way it's my baby and I can mould it into what I want it to be.

After that, anybody can read it. And if they don't like it, not my problem.

Jess Haines
12-07-2009, 08:22 AM
I know there are friends, family and acquaintances who won't care for my work. They aren't my target audience, so I don't feel too bad about that.

One person told me today, "You know, it's not the sort of thing I usually read, but I'll probably buy it anyway and put it on my shelf just to support you." I can deal with that. :D

blacbird
12-07-2009, 09:11 AM
Just because you want give us five pages of description doesn't mean readers will want to read it (ahem, Scott Lynch, AHEM.)

I never heard of anybody named Scott Lynch, but I assume you mention him because his novel(s) is(are), ahem, published, AHEM. And maybe even, ahem, popular, AHEM.

Which means, ahem, that SOMEBODY seems to want to read them.

AHEM.

caw

Rhoda Nightingale
12-07-2009, 09:33 AM
My parents are my toughest crowd. They've both read drafts of my WIP, although for my dad I had to give him a cautionary disclaimer. "Now, Dad, there are gay vampires in this book. In the very first scene. And they're going to be kissing. A lot. I can tell you what pages to skip if you want." He just gave me this look like I'd just told him his cat had been put to sleep while he was at school, but then he just said, "No, it's okay, uh, I'll read it. . ." (He's a closeted homophobe. He pretends to be liberal, but I know he gets squicked out easily.)

So yeah, I worry about that kind of thing with him. With Mom, I just worry that she'll convince herself she did something wrong when I was growing up and that's what makes me write about dark, disturbing, death-related things.

BUT that's their problem, not mine.

JimmyB27
12-08-2009, 04:32 PM
Meh, so long as I like it, and I get pots of money from a publisher for it, I'll be happy. ;)

Thump
12-08-2009, 04:49 PM
I know that my family will read anything of mine that ends up being published but it's not really their thing. Well, maybe my sisters might enjoy it but it's not a sure thing since my kind of fantasy and SF is not really their cuppa.

I'm kinda glad because it would be harder if it was something they were interested in. I think the pressure to please them would be greater, maybe crippling.

kaitie
12-08-2009, 05:27 PM
My best friend doesn't like my current story and that hurt like hell. It was the first thing I've ever done that I felt was actually good. It had an interesting story, fun characters, and the writing didn't suck ass. He read the first couple of chapters, and usually with my past writing he's wanted it as soon as I wrote anything, even just a page. This time around, I'd spend three months waiting on him to read it and finally he'd feel guilty and do it, which of course made me feel like crap because it was obvious that the only reason he did at all was because he felt bad about it.

I think what got me most wasn't just that it was my best friend who disliked my work, it was the fact that it was apparently so bad he wouldn't even read it as a favor to me. Maybe I just have a strange opinion regarding things like that, but my friends have often had me read their writing for whatever purpose, and I don't think it's ever occurred to me not to read it whether I liked it or not. I'd do it solely because they were my friend and they asked. So I guess it was like not only does it suck, it sucks to the extent that you don't even want to read it as a friend.

Eventually I just said screw it and decided maybe it wasn't his style. I've never figured out what's so wrong with it, honestly. The next one is definitely one he'd enjoy in terms of story, but I'm honestly afraid at this point and probably won't give it to him to read at all until it's finished because I'm not sure if I can take another round of saying you like it and then refusing to read it. It almost killed my confidence this time around.

Anyway, my mom has read this one and she actually enjoyed it. I really didn't expect her to, to be honest. She has different taste than I do, and I thought most of the humor would be too...specific to things that were nostalgic for my age group and that she wouldn't get into it. She actually found it really funny, though, and I really was surprised she liked it. She's even willing to read the latest draft.

So yeah, having someone around telling me it doesn't suck is definitely important to me. That's mostly just a result of having very little confidence in my ability. I might think this is great, but I'm aware that there are a lot of writers who aren't very good who think their work is the best out there, so I figure my opinion doesn't count for much.

CaroGirl
12-08-2009, 05:39 PM
Getting published will be its own reward. Congratulations from family and friends means something, of course, but whether they like it or not means little. I write for myself and for readers. If readers happen to be family members or friends, great, if not, oh well.

seun
12-08-2009, 05:52 PM
There are only a few people in my family who read (eldest brother and both parents). If they liked my stuff, then cool. If not, :Shrug:

To be honest, the first person I write to impress/shock/make laugh or weep is my wife. Anyone else is a bonus.

Judg
12-08-2009, 06:06 PM
Getting published will be its own reward. Congratulations from family and friends means something, of course, but whether they like it or not means little. I write for myself and for readers. If readers happen to be family members or friends, great, if not, oh well.
Yeah, like she doesn't have a bunch of us telling us how well she writes. ;) Although I admittedly did tell her that one of them was a little too bleak for me...

What's really awkward is being on the other side. I've got kids who are musicians and songwriters. I did a bit of that myself in the day, but they are more serious. You know, concerts and recordings and all. And one of them, well, it's not my cuppa. Like, it's a style of music that I so actively dislike, I couldn't possibly survive a concert. It really sets my teeth on edge. The other one, well, his stuff I really enjoy. Not that I like every single bit of it (hey, I'm in another generation) but for the most part, I think it's really cool stuff. But I'm the mother here. I can't go touting one guy's stuff and not mention the other. *sigh* The one whose stuff I can't handle takes it pretty well; he gets the whole thing of personal tastes, but I feel bad I can't be more supportive. Which means if family members don't want to read my books, I guess I can't get in a snit about it, can I?

icerose
12-08-2009, 06:11 PM
So yeah, having someone around telling me it doesn't suck is definitely important to me. That's mostly just a result of having very little confidence in my ability. I might think this is great, but I'm aware that there are a lot of writers who aren't very good who think their work is the best out there, so I figure my opinion doesn't count for much.

With my first completed novel one of my older sisters agreed to read it. It took her nine months to get back to me with very faint praise. The faint praise actually hurt worse because I could tell she didn't like it. So I learned very early not to base my personal feelings in my writing. Another sister helped me edit it for the PA disaster and she liked it and wants to read the second book but I can't write the second book because the first was munched by a monster.


Getting published will be its own reward. Congratulations from family and friends means something, of course, but whether they like it or not means little. I write for myself and for readers. If readers happen to be family members or friends, great, if not, oh well.

Oh yeah, definitely. Publishing is my ultimate reward for writing good enough other people want to read it.

It just really struck me because my family has been my greatest supporters and they've supported me from the beginning. It's ironic if anything else that even if I do get something published what I write is something they will never read.

icerose
12-08-2009, 06:14 PM
And to add on because a few people have mentioned spouses, my husband will never read any of my stuff either. He thinks I'm very twisted and when I talk about what I'm writing, he gives me that look like I just killed the family dog in front of the kids.

I don't need anyone's approval, it just feels weird to realize I'll never get it.

Namatu
12-08-2009, 06:16 PM
I think what got me most wasn't just that it was my best friend who disliked my work, it was the fact that it was apparently so bad he wouldn't even read it as a favor to me.Same thing happened to me. (More than once; same friend.) I tend to interpret it as the book or my style just really not being their cuppa. I don't want anyone reading - or beta'ing - one of my stories if it would be a chore, and I tell everyone up front that if it's not their thing, return it with no foul. Then I find other betas. Don't let someone's personal taste affect your confidence in your work. Their lack of reading is not a reflection on your story! It's a letdown when good friends disappoint us - it sucks - and I won't say I'm happy that my friend can't make it through what I write. I value her opinion. But if she doesn't want to give it, eh! Her loss! ;)


Eventually I just said screw it and decided maybe it wasn't his style.Yes. This.


I've never figured out what's so wrong with it, honestly.Nothing may be wrong with it. So one person didn't want to read it. If it's published, not everyone will buy it. Friendship makes it harder when this happens, but again, his lack of interest is not a reflection on your story. He's one person, one opinion. Find another one. :)

CaroGirl
12-08-2009, 06:22 PM
Yeah, like she doesn't have a bunch of us telling us how well she writes. ;) Although I admittedly did tell her that one of them was a little too bleak for me...
Thanks, Judg! I hope you know how much your support means to me. :) And when do I get to see some shiny new thing of yours, by the way? ;)

Anyway, there are different kinds of support. Just because someone doesn't like what you write, doesn't mean she can't support your effort. I work at cultivating strong friendships. So if, in my wildest dreams, I managed to publish a novel, I know a launch party would be well attended. Even of they never cracked the spine, I know my friends would buy the book and keep it proudly in support of me. And I would do the same for them. And that is enough.

Judg
12-08-2009, 06:42 PM
How about next time I'm in town for a crit group meeting? ;) But right now I'm doing a major reworking of the first book. *sigh*

Ellefire
12-08-2009, 06:57 PM
My sister has never read any of my stuff, she's just not a reader, so that doesn't bother me. My husband reads sometimes (in fact he's still reading the Deaver novel I gave him for Christmas last year) and it hurts a wee bit that he hasn't so much as glanced at my stuff. But then, he'll take the kids out so I can write and he didn't mind paying for my nano-victory bottle of wine (although actually, he paid for the stuff that I should have bought with the money I spent on the wine, but he didn't moan. Bah, skintness sucks) but even if he doesn't read, he's supportive.

My parents have read almost everything. My mum's only criticism was that "'Reunion' was your weakest book". My dad is incredibly helpful. He said of my second book 'Well, it's okay, but it won't ever be a best-seller.' ouch! But he was right. It's not. He'll pull me up on my grammar, tell me where the story sucks and will give unbiased opinion. He's a voracious reader, and he picks my stuff apart as a reader would. If I can please him, I'm doing it right.

Phaeal
12-08-2009, 07:42 PM
As long as my target audience (aka Pard and Primary Beta Reader) likes the stories and books, I'm good.

I have one nephew and niece who will probably like my stuff. They're the ones who used to listen to me retell The Lord of the Rings every Christmas. It took about three days, because they wouldn't let me leave out a single subplot.

My best friend just isn't a fic reader, never has been. Being an actor, though, he does like reading my scripts. I think he's looking for a breakout role for himself. ;)

Kalyke
12-08-2009, 08:47 PM
How important is it to other writers that people they know read and appreciate what they write?

Apparently it's not high on my list because I've never written anything I've really loved that even remotely appealed to any of them.

This is so close to my heart you could not imagine! I feel that it is vastly important that those around you appreciate your talents and must not run screaming when you bring them a few pages to read. In the 15 years I have been writing, one family member actually sat still (under duress) to read something I wrote. That person called me a "hack" and was very uncomplimentary--thank you Mother. Perhaps wanting to become a novalist was not her idea of a proper career? She had been pushing me to become a brain surgeon and I chose a bohemian life. What a dissapointment I must have been.

I am now putting out work that I see as on par with many very good writers (dead ones like Hemmingway and Graham Greene). Even with this upgrading of my talents-- formed in the crucibel of a life that has been a series of non-stop shocks and dissapointments-- and I still get no interest of hits from family or friends.

Okay, my limited Psychological training assures me that they do not want their familar child to "change." They want to see you in a certain way. They do not want to see into your real heart, just see you in the mirror they have themselves created. My thesis is that people see you the way they want to see you, and often this is not the way you really are. Mothers see their babies as sweetness and light, puppydogs and rainbows. They do not see their little pomegranate penning horrific scenes of torture and debauchery-- dark lust and fornication (etc.)

So they hang on to their own version of you. The worst thing that could happen is that this bunnyrainbowdoodle hands them a floppy MS of a nasty, murdering psychopath who in fact was dreamed up in bunnyrainbowdoodle's head. This causes cognitive dissonence in their minds and leads to insomnia, and self loathing: Why did I expose my little Pomegranate to murder and lies? I am a bad mother! Bad! Bad!

icerose
12-08-2009, 08:56 PM
That's a really interesting take on it. It's just ironic that it's still not accepted even though I wrote these kinds of things even when I was little.

Still, they are supportive and that's all I can ask, really. Even though they don't like what I write, they are still very encouraging. Though they still ask me now and then why I don't write X. I have tried to answer this question but some things you just can't explain to people who simply haven't gone through it themselves.

Ellefire
12-08-2009, 09:05 PM
In his book On Writing, Stephen King talks about the questions people ask him. Top of the list is 'why do you write horror?', his answering question is 'why do you assume I have a choice?'.

You write what you write, mainly what you love to read. Fortunately my parents have seen me reading horror since my early teens, they know what a sick, twisted little puppy they created.

It must run in the family, my six year old spent all afternoon pretending to pull her face off and coughing an imaginary brain into her hand after laughing through the human-to-ood transformation scene on Doctor Who. Now that's a sick and twisted puppy. :D That's ma girl!

Jenifer
12-08-2009, 09:15 PM
You know, it never occurred to me! Huh.

I'm not sure my family will really read me ;) if I ever get anything out there. I don't think it will have as much to do with active dislike/mismatched taste as it will, well, priorities- my family doesn't read much. We're into motorcycles, horses, cars... movies. My Mom will probably read my books out of a feeling of obligation. My Dad might read so that he can laugh at me (but will probably skip the reading part). My Grandfather's older sister is a reader, but I'm not sure my current projects are her type.

Friends will be more likely to read because, well, I picked them- and I like readers!

It'd be nice if my closer friends and family enjoyed my work, but really, I have a pretty small circle. <50 people related to or close too me that it would be nice to impress. You can't earn out an advance on 50 people, so impressing the family, etc. would be more of a bonus than a serious goal.

Ervin
12-08-2009, 10:27 PM
Tell them all to **** off.

Lady Ice
12-08-2009, 11:31 PM
I just finished a very dark crime thriller. My Bloody Diary. The character came to me with her twisted little story and sarcastic mannerism. She's witty, funny, and deeply disturbed. Very much a psychopath. And yet she's my protagonist.

You can see a glimpse of her voice in my sigline.

I set in knowing no one I personally know would ever read it. I have family who think I need to write about skipping prancing ponies. You would think that my soul sucking house that ate my MC's family members novel at the age of twelve would make them realize I'm not a light and happy writer, but they are persistant.

Read Lolita.

icerose
12-08-2009, 11:40 PM
I would love to but I can't get it in my area and all spare money is headed for christmas, which is regrettably not much. Unemployment for three months and then no income right after it for 6 weeks is just no fun.

Celia Cyanide
12-08-2009, 11:56 PM
You guys are hilarious. I think this is the book that really hit me. They will never read what I write because of what I write about. Oh well, back to death and destruction.

I think that's great. My family doesn't like violent movies, so they don't watch the ones I'm in. And whenever there's something I did with sex and nudity, I just tell them it's too violent! Then I never have to show it to them.

Maxinquaye
12-09-2009, 12:09 AM
I have family who think I need to write about skipping prancing ponies. You would think that my soul sucking house that ate my MC's family members novel at the age of twelve would make them realize I'm not a light and happy writer, but they are persistant.

My mum wants me to write nice stories, and got annoyed at the time I showed them to her, that it was all about angst and pain and stuff. Ingmar Bergman, you got nothing on me.

So I know exactly how you feel. But the soulsucking flesheating horse... Wish I'd thought of that.

I did write about an undead dog when I was a kid; it was full of maggots, and its eyes were rotted, and it snuck into your bed at night.

These days I want to be Zadie Smith. My heroine.

icerose
12-09-2009, 08:03 PM
My mum wants me to write nice stories, and got annoyed at the time I showed them to her, that it was all about angst and pain and stuff. Ingmar Bergman, you got nothing on me.

So I know exactly how you feel. But the soulsucking flesheating horse... Wish I'd thought of that.

I did write about an undead dog when I was a kid; it was full of maggots, and its eyes were rotted, and it snuck into your bed at night.

These days I want to be Zadie Smith. My heroine.

You're absolutely welcome to use a horse, I used a house. ;)

Phaeal
12-09-2009, 10:45 PM
Ewwww, maggotty undead dog. Me likes. ;)

The Lonely One
12-09-2009, 11:16 PM
Some people say we all die alone.

I say we all write alone. Support of friends and family is nice but temporary compared to the overall.

Judg
12-09-2009, 11:18 PM
Some people say we all die alone.

I say we all write alone. Support of friends and family is nice but temporary compared to the overall.
Yes, but you would say that. You're The Lonely One, after all. :D