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Michael Davis
11-28-2009, 08:11 AM
Don't know if this article has been posted before, but its a fairly broad survey of book earnings and royalties for 4 dozen publishers. If ya haven't seen it, might find it interesting in terms of where your sales fit.

http://www.brendahiatt.com/id2.html

She last updated her survey in 11/09

smcc360
12-01-2009, 08:00 PM
Very interesting. Thanks for the link.

With a median advance of $40K, I see that Ballentine are the lucky folks whom I will allow to inflict my magnum opus upon the world. If they're too short-sighted, then I will consider HarperCollins and Bantam/Dell. Fat City, here I come!

On another note: Harlequin NASCAR? That's a subgenre I would not have expected.

Noah Body
12-01-2009, 08:27 PM
Great find, thanks for sharing it!

Madison
12-02-2009, 03:57 AM
Does n/a mean (in this case) that the information is not available?

jennontheisland
12-02-2009, 04:04 AM
Keep in mind that those numbers are primarily for the romance genre. Lit fic, fantasy, or other genre numbers may be very different.

Shadow_Ferret
12-02-2009, 04:05 AM
What does "average earn-out" mean?

And wow, I wasn't interested in selling digital, but with those mid-2 digit royalties compared to the measly 1 digit royalties traditional publishers pay...

I didn't realize publishers were that cheap.

Fillanzea
12-02-2009, 04:38 AM
Seconding Jennontheisland that there's a huge difference between the genres, and also between hardcover/trade PB/mass market paperback. I think that 10%-12.5% is more typical for hardcover royalties. It still doesn't approach the digital publishers, but a huge cut of a print book goes to the retailer, and another huge cut goes to the cost of printing, so I don't consider it too stingy.

jennontheisland
12-02-2009, 04:44 AM
Epublishers typically don't sell anywhere near the volume of print. You may be getting 35% but you'll be lucky to sell 1000 books.

Veinglory's EREC site tracks sales of romance/erotica. Have a look if you want to see digital numbers.

http://www.erecsite.com/SALES.html

Jamesaritchie
12-02-2009, 07:13 PM
When I see the word "average" I'm always reminded of the man who spent his time with his head in the oven and his feet in the freezer. . .on average, he was very comfortable.

I'd rather know what the median advance is, not the average.

Irysangel
12-02-2009, 07:20 PM
What does "average earn-out" mean?

And wow, I wasn't interested in selling digital, but with those mid-2 digit royalties compared to the measly 1 digit royalties traditional publishers pay...

I didn't realize publishers were that cheap.

To be fair, traditional publishers also pay you a large chunk up front, which isn't the case with a digital publisher.

You can end up making the same money (some EC/Samhain folks are pulling in way more money than some romance midlisters) but the main difference with the money is that NY pays up front -- and royalties are pretty much considered gravy.

Priene
12-02-2009, 07:24 PM
When I see the word "average" I'm always reminded of the man who spent his time with his head in the oven and his feet in the freezer. . .on average, he was very comfortable.

I'd rather know what the median advance is, not the average.

The median temperature of his body parts was probably OK as well. Their standard deviation, on the other hand....



(Libbie's probably going to come along in a minute and call me a nerd again.)

CheshireCat
12-05-2009, 06:35 AM
What does "average earn-out" mean?

And wow, I wasn't interested in selling digital, but with those mid-2 digit royalties compared to the measly 1 digit royalties traditional publishers pay...

I didn't realize publishers were that cheap.

I think somebody else already said it, but consider that a mass-market edition of your book can sell hundreds of thousands of copies (or at least tens of thousands) while the ebook edition sells in the neighborhood of a few thousand. If you're lucky.

Currently, of course. I've noticed a pretty steep climb in ebook sales over the last two or three books; on my last statement, one book earned over $20k in ebook royalties. Of course, the same book earned a healthy six figures in print royalties over the same period.


Epublishers typically don't sell anywhere near the volume of print. You may be getting 35% but you'll be lucky to sell 1000 books.

Exactly.

But, as I said, that's currently. Nobody really knows what the market will do, or how the ratio of print to ebook sales will shift as time passes. The larger ebook royalty percentage takes into account the lower cost the publisher has to bear (no printing, shipping, or storage costs, for instance).

But if the ebook market continues to grow, and takes up a bigger slice of the earnings pie, you can bet publishers will find a way to whittle away at that now-larger ebook royalty.

Seriously. Bet money now.