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View Full Version : Borders (UK) is in administration



Priene
11-27-2009, 03:10 PM
It doesn't look very good (http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2009/nov/26/borders-goes-into-administration) at all. Its website (http://www.borders.co.uk/) is just a message from the receivers.

When this happens to a retail group just before Christmas, it's usually fatal.

euclid
11-27-2009, 04:32 PM
http://www.spectator.co.uk/susanhill/5575828/theres-bookshops-and-then.thtml

JimmyB27
11-27-2009, 04:38 PM
Meh, I buy my books in Waterstones.

Ken
11-27-2009, 04:43 PM
Waterstones may well be the next to go

... from Euclid's link.

Priene
11-27-2009, 04:52 PM
If Waterstones and Borders both go, that's pretty much it for High Street bookshops in Britain. There'll be speciality shops down side-alleys and Amazon on the internet.

gothicangel
11-27-2009, 04:54 PM
Just been discussing this on another website.

I live in Stirling and over the last two years, three bookshops have shut. There are no independents left in the area. Its at a point were I will be forced to shop at Amazon.

emilycross
11-27-2009, 05:06 PM
Is there any word about waterstones in Ireland? I really love waterstones!

JimmyB27
11-27-2009, 05:12 PM
... from Euclid's link.
*Hurries off to buy everyone's Christmas present from Waterstones*

Don't gooooooo!!

Lady Ice
11-27-2009, 05:14 PM
NO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

seun
11-27-2009, 05:59 PM
It's at least partly down to supermarkets and shops such as HMV selling books. Still a shame. I always liked Borders.

JimmyB27
11-27-2009, 06:39 PM
It's at least partly down to supermarkets and shops such as HMV selling books. Still a shame. I always liked Borders.
Really? I've seen books in supermarkets, but never anything worth buying. Mostly rip-offs of big selling authors like Dan Brown or Tom Clancy (The Michaelangelo Engima, The Hunt For Blue November*). And HMV has a very small range.

*Yes, I made those up :tongue

Priene
11-27-2009, 06:56 PM
Really? I've seen books in supermarkets, but never anything worth buying. Mostly rip-offs of big selling authors like Dan Brown or Tom Clancy (The Michaelangelo Engima, The Hunt For Blue November*). And HMV has a very small range.

Supermarket books may not be at the literary end of the market, but they sell in vast quantities. Publishers have given big discounts to supermarkets on these books, which means even the likes of Borders can't compete on them. So a profitable end of the market has disappeared. Couple it with the demise of the Net Book Agreement and the rise of the internet and you get this: the collapse of the retail book chain.

Rarri
11-27-2009, 07:38 PM
I'd think supermarkets sell a lot of books; in Tesco, for example, they usually have a '2 books for 7' deal on, or will sell the latest cookery book, celebrity (auto)biography or abuse memoir at a low price.

I still miss Ottakers, it would be horrible to see Waterstones go too. Then again, i have to admit that i buy most of my books through Amazon, so i guess i can't complain.

Jamesaritchie
11-27-2009, 08:33 PM
I remeber, back when teh chain stores first started, hearing several experts predicting they would be HUGE, but would also eventually fail. Most put the failure between 2000 and 2010.

They were a bit off on the timetable, but their arguments made good sense, and most of the reasons they predicted for eventual failure are coming to pass.

I wouldn't be a bit disappointed if all the big chains failed. That might leave a bunch of room for the independents to make a comeback.

para
11-28-2009, 11:39 PM
It's at least partly down to supermarkets and shops such as HMV selling books. Still a shame. I always liked Borders.
I thought HMV owned Waterstones? Waterstones has been losing money hand over fist but HMV is quite solvent.

scarletpeaches
11-28-2009, 11:43 PM
Border's is the only shop where I find erotica.

Looks like I'll have to get an eBook reader and a paypal account now.

scarletpeaches
11-28-2009, 11:45 PM
Also, from that link, "Far too many books are published?"

What a load of shite. The economy's in trouble, or too many books are released? Make up your bloody mind.

Mr Flibble
11-28-2009, 11:56 PM
As long as Waterstone's hangs on till Saturday when I do my first signing :D

Relly, I'm not that sure about the supermarket's impact. All my local Sainsbury's sells is about a dozen different adult books ( Cookbooks, celeb bios etc, virtually no fiction) Even Smiths doesn't have a huge range. You can get mainstream and maybe a couple of the biggest things in genre ( Tolkien, Stephen King) but not much else

On the other hand, Waterstone's is always packed, ( and wasn't there a news article recently about how they're selling an e-reader every two minutes?) and I regularly have to queue for a while to buy a book.

Momento Mori
11-29-2009, 10:04 PM
Priene:
If Waterstones and Borders both go, that's pretty much it for High Street bookshops in Britain. There'll be speciality shops down side-alleys and Amazon on the internet.

I'm not so sure about that. A lot of the reason for book stores failing comes down to over-expansion, which usually goes hand-in-hand with being over-leveraged. In theory if someone were to buy the core 20 bestselling Borders stores (which I suspect are those stores in areas with a lot of footfall trading due to good location), then it should be an enterprise generating steady profits.

But that's an awful lot of ifs and the problem is that private equity (which to my mind is the best hope for continuing Borders as a business) won't be interested in anything other than the ability to make a fast turn-around profit.

MM

Jamesaritchie
11-29-2009, 10:17 PM
Also, from that link, "Far too many books are published?"

What a load of shite. The economy's in trouble, or too many books are released? Make up your bloody mind.

Good economy or bad, far, far too many novels have been published for twenty years now. That same has been true of several types of nonfiction.

About twenty or so years ago, publishers adopted the philosophy of "But a bunch, throw them all at the wall, and see which ones stick."

It isn't about the economy, it's about how thin you can spread the money, and still have more than a couple of publishers and a few top writers come out ahead.

There are thousands of publishers out there releasing books at a ridiculous rate, and it's harming everyone. For publishers, the sheer volume of books flooding the market makes it tougher to turn a profit, and guarantees that profit must come from bestselling writers. For writers, the number of books being released does make it a bit easier to get published, but it also makes it much, much more difficult to stay published, and to make any real money from it.

The number of books being released should have been cut by at least twenty percent long ago, but technology has made it so incredibly easy for nearly anyone to become a "publisher" that cutting back now would be like unilateral disarmament.

BenPanced
11-30-2009, 12:11 AM
Borders isn't in too great of shape here in the US, either. One store in my area was closed after being open for less than three years, even though it was in a high traffic area and one of only two bookstores (the other being B&N) in a major downtown area. Now it seems like they're more interested in keeping the locations in larger malls.

seun
11-30-2009, 05:25 PM
I thought HMV owned Waterstones? Waterstones has been losing money hand over fist but HMV is quite solvent.

They do own it (or they did the last I heard) but if people are buying their books in a record shop and not a book shop, the book shop loses out.