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Judg
11-23-2009, 10:00 PM
Sometimes my sister-in-law makes me look good.

My oldest son was in town doing a concert. In a rather unusual venue. An indoor skateboard park was trying something new: having a series of bands play right in the skate park. Two of my other kids and my nephew went to the concert.

While they're hanging about in the tour bus between sets, my sister-in-law phones her son. She's worried. Watch out dear. It could be such a rough crowd. Poor guy has to field this call while hanging out with two of the bands. My kids are in stitches.

My nephew is just shy of 22, strongly built, and is the kind of laidback guy who never attracts fights. Most of the people at the park are teenagers. He could squash most of them with one hand.

This is the same sister-in-law that warned my kids when they were small not to put their hands out the car window. So that kidnappers would not be able to grab them.

For some strange reason, they think she's insane.

writerterri
11-23-2009, 10:44 PM
This is the same sister-in-law that warned my kids when they were small not to put their hands out the car window. So that kidnappers would not be able to grab them.

For some strange reason, they think she's insane.


All my kids are convinced that when we go up a hill in the car they need to help me by putting their feet on the dash and push to help the car up. One day my son, 12, put two and two together and busted me on it. I payed him not to tell the girls. My 10 year old questioned me the other day on how this works. I told her that I didn't know but to just keep her feet up there until we make it up. Whew! Thank goodness she pressed a little harder. :D

Hi, my name is Terri and this story is not quite the same but I'm insane.

Sweetleaf
11-23-2009, 10:52 PM
:ROFL:

Your poor nephew! That totally kills the cool credentials!
I think she might need to cut the apron strings a little. He's nearly 22? And mummy still can't let him go out without worrying?


You must be the cool aunty... :)

benbradley
11-23-2009, 10:57 PM
This is where I'm reminded to write my memoir yet again, but remembering and trying to write down the events where my mother and others lied to me, teased me, and on and on... just about drives ME insane.

At some vague point between maybe 4th and 8th grade I discovered that books, even the worst ones with spelling and factual errors, were a hell of a lot more reliable than any person I interacted with. Furthermore, books never put me down. I've been inhaling printed matter ever since.

Spock (the one on Star Trek, not the baby doctor) was my hero because he didn't feel those pesky emotions...

Kate Thornton
11-23-2009, 11:02 PM
22. He could just not answer the phone. After all, he knows what's coming.

Sometimes the apron strings get cut by the tied-up party. Maybe he needs to at least loosen 'em up a little.

Yes, and you are most assuredly the cool aunt!

Kate Thornton
11-23-2009, 11:05 PM
This is where I'm reminded to write my memoir yet again, but remembering and trying to write down the events where my mother and others lied to me, teased me, and on and on... just about drives ME insane.

At some vague point between maybe 4th and 8th grade I discovered that books, even the worst ones with spelling and factual errors, were a hell of a lot more reliable than any person I interacted with. Furthermore, books never put me down. I've been inhaling printed matter ever since.

Spock (the one on Star Trek, not the baby doctor) was my hero because he didn't feel those pesky emotions...

There's a big difference between fun family games (Terri's car pushing) and mothers who lie and tease and hurt. I hate to see anyone, but esp. moms tease their children publicly and cause them hurt. I see this in stores and it makes me cringe. I'm sorry this happened to you, BB - maybe writing it out would help make it recede.

bettielee
11-23-2009, 11:27 PM
(who else totally wants to know who these bands are?!)

ha - I know a mom who is like this - she treats her college student daughter like she's 15when she comes home. She doesn't understand why her kids don't want to be home 24/7 - and she should know, she was a hellion. She was never home, assure you, I knew her then!

BB - Kate's right. You must write the memoir! Sell big and then go "neener neener neener"! at the baddies. :) This is what I would do, but I am a small person. (being a fairy and all)

semilargeintestine
11-24-2009, 12:01 AM
(who else totally wants to know who these bands are?!)


That was my first thought, lol.

backslashbaby
11-24-2009, 12:14 AM
Hee hee. I'm so glad my parents generally recognized my age, maturity, and the fact that what they did younger put things into perspective ;)

I wasn't going to be 18 for several months, for instance, and I met a professor who was 32 and asked me to dinner after we hung out with mutual friends for several weeks at the same cafe.

Mom's response? She dated a 34-year-old when she was just-turned 19 :D Some of the best times of her life.

God, I love it when parents (and aunts) are cool :)

regdog
11-24-2009, 12:19 AM
I'm **cough cough** years old and my Aunt still puts an extra blanket on me
at night if she thinks it's too cold and I don't have enough blankets on.

Susie
11-24-2009, 12:40 AM
LOL. Just yesterday I called my b-i-l to wish him a happy 71st b-day. My sis told me that I was an old lady now. The funneh part? She's 4 years older than me! That struck me very :roll:

One time I visited my 91 yr-old-mom and she's normally very serious, but this time when we went to bed, I woke up to go to the er potty. When I returned, my bed was made and she was lying on her side, like she hadn't moved. We were the only two in the house! hehe.

JoNightshade
11-24-2009, 12:45 AM
My first year in college, I was rather surprised one day when the cops showed up at my dorm room. They proceeded to interrogate me regarding the whereabouts of my roomie - where I had last seen her, what she was doing, when she would be back, etc. I was like, "Uh... well, I'm not sure, but she'll probably be back from class in a while?"

Turns out roomie's mom had not heard from her in a couple of days, gotten worried... and phoned the cops to come check.

Seriously.

tjwriter
11-24-2009, 01:33 AM
And now I know how very lucky I was.

Wayne K
11-24-2009, 01:35 AM
You must be the cool aunty... :)
I'll second this nomination.

Mela
11-24-2009, 01:46 AM
I had a boss once give me instructions on how to interview and handle myself with a pair of Russians for some sort of PR event for a client - don't ask me about the Russian connection - it escapes me now. Point is, she didn't trust me alone with 2 men; thought I'd get all flirty and lose my head and toss my hair and oh dear, did I just drop my hanky? The Russian part was especially drilled into my head; she thought I'd get carried away because they wanted American women, or some such thing.

This, after spending 15 years as a journalist and editor, during which I assure you I interviewed lots and lots of men.

I stayed in that job around six months.

benbradley
11-24-2009, 01:49 AM
Alice Miller's designation for the cool aunty is enightened witness (http://www.alice-miller.com/index_en.php?page=2).

Woops, don't read that link.

Judg
11-24-2009, 02:59 AM
LOL. I really don't think she was trying to humiliate him. She thinks that's perfectly normal. Her mother (my MIL) thinks cell phones are wonderful because that way the kids can phone home to let their parents know that they've finished their classes (at university) and are now driving home. I was flabbergasted. "But they're adults!"

Italian culture or something.

Bettielee, my son's band is called Never More Than Less. They're not exactly international stars or anything, but they're way beyond garage band status. You can find them all over the internet. I'm sorry to say, I'm not cool enough to enjoy their music, a cross between metal and punk. So no, I wasn't cool enough to go to the concert myself.

Mela, I'm not surprised you only lasted a few months. Oy.

Jo, the cops? And they went along with this?

My father specifically told me that he raised his kids to be able to do without him, so I have a lot of trouble understanding this hover mentality. Although he broke his own rule once... We were on a family ski trip and one of the guys from his office was with us. The young guy. The womanizer. Said young guy decides he wants to go pubbing after a day on the slopes (he also seemed to possess unlimited energy) and asked me if I wanted to go. I was only 18, but I'd been away from home for the better part of a year and had gotten quite accustomed to running my own life. I opened my mouth to answer but my father got there first. "She's not going." I was a little miffed, but seeing as I had been planning on saying no anyway, I let it pass. This after he let me spend the summer in Europe on my own. Go figure.

Backslash, I'm afraid I said no to the professor... :D But I will confess to dating grad students at that age.

Kate, that thought kind of crossed my mind too. On the other hand, I have seen him stand up to her. But he's very low-key about it, like his father. And to be fair, they're lovely kids, so she must be doing something right. But realistic risk assessment has never been her strong point... LOL

I would cheerfully pile advice on my own (adult) kids, but I do recognize that if they haven't asked for it, I'm more likely to make them want to go in the opposite direction, so I try to keep my mouth shut. I usually succeed. They probably only notice the times I fail. Oh well.

Judg
11-24-2009, 03:15 AM
Interesting link there, Ben. In the case of my SIL, I really don't think she's trying to embarrass her kids. She's just clueless, not vicious. And I think her kids put up with the cluelessness because they recognize how much she really does care about them. Not that I've asked them outright.