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kristie911
07-22-2005, 04:50 AM
I recieved a "form letter" from an agent today rejecting my manuscript, however, it asks that if the project is still available in six weeks to resubmit. "We are inundated w/ submissions at the present time and can consider only a tiny fraction of material that we would otherwise have loved to read." Then the request to resubmit.

Is this just a polite way of saying "You suck" or should I actually try again in a few weeks? I've never seen a rejection worded that way.

Thanks for the help!

Zolah
07-22-2005, 03:10 PM
Why on earth would they ask you to re-submit your ms as a way of telling you that it sucks? If an agent thinks your material sucks, they'll send it back to you. They may even scrawl 'This Sucks!' on the front of it. But one thing they WON'T ask you to do is send it back to them again. I think you're being more than usually paranoid here...

brinkett
07-22-2005, 03:42 PM
I know someone who got the same letter, resubmitted, and received the same letter in response. So should he submit again (for the third time), or assume it's a form letter worded to soften the blow? When he told me about the first letter, I thought it was encouraging, but when he received the second one, I started to wonder.

Perhaps someone here has received this letter, resubmitted, and received a positive result?

Julie Worth
07-22-2005, 03:43 PM
Iíve never had that happen, although Iíve been invited to submit my next novel. And perhaps the agent was being nice, not realizing that I can write a novel as fast as the average agent can read one! Anyway, I sent it, and now Iíll see.

smallthunder
07-24-2005, 08:20 AM
I personally have not received a form letter like the one you're discussing, but my gut feelling is -- do as the agent asks, and resubmit in six weeks. What do you have to lose, save for the cost of postage?

And if you get the form letter again after you resubmit in six weeks -- well, it could be a snafu, or it could mean that this agent/agency is not as pulled-together as one would wish. At that point, consider the agent/agency's track record -- and ask yourself -- Would you still be willing to work with them in light of their cluelessness? Do you have any other potential representation for your work?

Then weigh your answer to those two questions against the cost of resubmitting (postage) -- and either resubmit, or move on.

Just my two pence ...

arkady
07-26-2005, 05:45 PM
I recieved a "form letter" from an agent today rejecting my manuscript, however, it asks that if the project is still available in six weeks to resubmit. "We are inundated w/ submissions at the present time and can consider only a tiny fraction of material that we would otherwise have loved to read." Then the request to resubmit.

Is this just a polite way of saying "You suck" or should I actually try again in a few weeks? I've never seen a rejection worded that way.

Thanks for the help!

Gina Panettieri, right?

kristie911
07-27-2005, 12:09 AM
Damn...burst my very tiny balloon, why don't you? lol Would you like to kick me in the stomach while you're at it? :)

Good guess.

arkady
08-04-2005, 06:56 PM
Your balloon hasn't necessarily been burst, kristie. Check out this thread on writers.net:

http://www.writers.net/forum/read/10/130196/130196Vf

Gina is clearly complaining about submissions that she's getting that are marked "requested material" and aren't. This suggests pretty strongly that the "submit-again-in-six-weeks" (aka requested material) directive may well mean exactly what it says.

Don't give up yet.

David McAfee
08-06-2005, 03:58 PM
If it helps or makes you feel any better, I just recived a rejection from her and there was no request to submit again in six weeks, so you definitely did better than I did. :)

WritingFool
08-29-2005, 06:01 PM
Everyone seems to think life as an agent or manager is simply based on them recieving a good story, and then automatically charging full speed ahead with it, leading to an option/sale. Could it possibly be that she has more on her plate at this particular time then she cares to juggle. Maybe even a few, or more than a few good writers shes sampling right now. Let us not forget the clientele she already has.

Maybe theres a tremendous list of potentials sitting on her desk, and she has an "A" "B" "C" list, where you might not be the A, that says 'WOW' to her, but at same time your not quite the 'not good enough yet' C either.
So theres still hope for ya.

Leave no stone unturned. If she didnt outright decline your work, theres something to try again. I tell ya, writers are worse than the most beautiful girls, some of the most insecure people Ive ever met. Take it as it comes, in this business, especially at the start, people will be very blunt. No means no, send means send, and the give me a few weeks to situate what I have on my plate, means just that.

Then, if your writings sharp, and its just your time, well hey, you might proceed to step 2.

Good luck.