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michael_b
11-09-2009, 10:33 PM
http://carinapress.com/

Major ebook only publisher just opened. Take a look at the bottom of the page where it gives the info on who backs this company.

This may be the ultimate wakeup call to the Romance Writer's of America.

CaoPaux
11-09-2009, 10:57 PM
w00t! :fistpump

Richard White
11-09-2009, 11:14 PM
From their FAQ
__________________________
As Carina Press is a division of Harlequin Enterprises Ltd, how is it different?

At the very basic level, Harlequin is a traditional print publisher with a robust digital-offering, while Carina Press is a digital-only publisher.

Both the contract and distribution channels are very different:

The Carina Press contract does not include an advance or DRM, and authors are compensated with a higher royalty.

Unlike Harlequin there is no guaranteed series distribution (no standing order, no direct mail, no overseas translation markets).

Carina Press titles will be sold direct to consumers through the Carina Press website, and we’ll be securing 3rd party distribution on other websites.

(emphasis added)

Carina Press FAQ #1 (http://carinapress.com/?page_id=5)
____________________________________________

So, let's see, yes it is backed by Harlequin, there are no advances, no guarantees of distribution and you can only buy them at their web site.

That's not a big change from other e-publishers that I can see.

JanDarby
11-09-2009, 11:16 PM
It's worrisome to me that they're adopting the no-advance model. I believe they currently pay advances to their existing e-only books (e.g., Spice Briefs), but now they're setting a precedent for not paying advances. That seems like the first step to them saying "okay, now we're not paying advances to ANY author." They might make exceptions for their top sellers, but the midlist and debut authors are likely to get squeezed.

I don't see how that's a good thing for authors. For the publisher, sure. The authors, not so much.

JD

Bubastes
11-09-2009, 11:22 PM
I'm also worried about their no-advance model. I find it interesting that they won't have DRM either. This aiso doesn't seem to help authors.

Haunted_October
11-10-2009, 02:13 AM
Harlequin just came out with a new Digital Press, but for all genres. Here's the link:

http://carinapress.com/

What do you think?

michael_b
11-10-2009, 02:21 AM
So, let's see, yes it is backed by Harlequin, there are no advances, no guarantees of distribution and you can only buy them at their web site.

That's not a big change from other e-publishers that I can see.

There is however the Harelquin reader base already in place--and since Harlequin titles are also available in eformat this will help increase traffic/sales--for romance and erotic romance titles. And there will also be third party distribution--which many epublishers also offer. You also have the backing of a large corporation behind it which means it's not going to be like the majority of small epublishers. So there are some major differences right out of the gate.

michael_b
11-10-2009, 02:27 AM
I'm also worried about their no-advance model. I find it interesting that they won't have DRM either. This aiso doesn't seem to help authors.

DRM helps no one and frustrates readers because if the device you got the original book on dies, you've pretty much lost the book and need to buy it again.

DRM does not stop pirating either because the people who put up pirated books tend to be the same people who can crack a DRM code, unlike your average reader who can't.

And the way the book industry is going is away from the old model of advances and print. I'm fine with no advance if the royalty percentage is in keeping with normal ebook publishers unlike some places that think 20% for e-royalties is fine. It's not. Standard is 35% to 50%. Gross and net being other variables to take into consideration.

michael_b
11-10-2009, 02:35 AM
It's worrisome to me that they're adopting the no-advance model. I believe they currently pay advances to their existing e-only books (e.g., Spice Briefs), but now they're setting a precedent for not paying advances. That seems like the first step to them saying "okay, now we're not paying advances to ANY author." They might make exceptions for their top sellers, but the midlist and debut authors are likely to get squeezed.

I don't see how that's a good thing for authors. For the publisher, sure. The authors, not so much.

JD

This is why they can take a chance on books that aren't the normal fare offered by Harlequin. No advance means that if a book bombs they're not taking a bath on it the way they'd do with print and advances.

This is not a print model publishing venture, they have adapted the ebook model.

The book industry is going to change and everyone is going to have to get used to the way it will be done now and into the future, rather than the way it's been done in the past. Things change. You don't see people selling horses and carriages anymore and in a few more decades print books will be the exception, not the rule.

Deb Kinnard
11-10-2009, 04:36 AM
This is why they can take a chance on books that aren't the normal fare offered by Harlequin. No advance means that if a book bombs they're not taking a bath on it the way they'd do with print and advances.

No--it might not be quite that easy. It might be that "no advance" means they simply don't get stuck with upfront costs on any particular acquisition.

Look at it this way. Digital-only publishing means the print set-up costs are no longer there. Instead of a given title costing them in the neighborhood of $20,000 to get to market, it may cost them a quarter of that (I don't know the exact cost of getting an e-book to release--I've heard figures that are too low to believe and too high to credit). Minus the advance--they begin making money that much faster, and can clear their initial investment months earlier since they're not giving the author DIME-ONE upfront.

Their reasoning breaks no new ground. It's the extant e-publishing model. Only if their royalty rate is industry standard will authors bother with them.

Of course I may be wrong. I often am. Time will tell.

James D. Macdonald
11-10-2009, 05:53 AM
The advance is only a small part of the cost of a book. Editing and promotion are far bigger slices of the pie.

This "no advance" thing is a troubling trend, and, for me, would be deal-breaker.

jennontheisland
11-10-2009, 06:07 AM
No advance is standard for romance epublishers. Most authors familiar with the system won't blink at that. On another board, Angela James reported 30% royalties. No idea if that's net or cover though.

Me, I see a huge jump in the steaminess of the content from Harlequin's Blaze line and the Spice line. Samhain and EC fill that gap. If they want typical ebook readers, they're going to have to consider how they approach the sex, imo.

Carina is also separating some genres out from the Romance/Erotic Romance umbrella by looking for mystery, horror, thriller, sci-fi etc. stories with some or no romantic elements. That's spreading things thin. It's also something other epubs have tried and for the most part abandoned.

Yeah, it's Harlequin. But it's still a new epublisher.

entropic island
11-10-2009, 06:18 AM
It seems shady...

No advance, and it tries to justify it. I wouldn't have trust in a publisher like that.

And it's only ebooks...(okay, they're an ebook publisher) but available ONLY from their site, as I understand it.

jennontheisland
11-10-2009, 06:22 AM
No advance does not automatically equal shady, especially for an epublisher. In fact, as I said above, it's pretty much industry standard for romance/erotic romance epublishers.

veinglory
11-10-2009, 06:32 AM
I wonder what this "higher royalty" is.

jennontheisland
11-10-2009, 06:37 AM
According to Angela James, 30%.
http://forums.romancedivas.com/index.php?showtopic=58706&view=findpost&p=866031

Higher than the digital royalty on Harlequin's print books (which, as far as I know is 8-10%).

Richard White
11-10-2009, 06:39 AM
That's about 10% under standard if I remember my earlier discussion with Veinglory about another e-publisher.

(See, Emily, I do pay attention. *grin*)

veinglory
11-10-2009, 06:39 AM
But on the low side of normal for other epublishers (anything n the 30-40% range is common).... I think it is a case of 'wait and see' as with any other epublisher.

Selah March
11-10-2009, 06:43 AM
And it's only ebooks...(okay, they're an ebook publisher) but available ONLY from their site, as I understand it.

From the Carina Press FAQ:

"Carina Press titles will be sold direct to consumers through the Carina Press website, and we’ll be securing 3rd party distribution on other websites."

I expect this means Fictionwise, AllRomanceEbooks, Kindle, Nook, etc.

Link. (http://carinapress.com/?page_id=5)

Psst. Could somebody please fix the misspelling in the thread title? Thanks.

Unimportant
11-10-2009, 06:44 AM
My guess is that Harlequin wants to dip its toe into some of the niche markets to see if they might be financially viable, without committing too much or risking offending their core readership.

Selah March
11-10-2009, 06:44 AM
But on the low side of normal for other epublishers (anything n the 30-40% range is common).... I think it is a case of 'wait and see' as with any other epublisher.

I imagine they expect authors to make up the difference in volume?

I agree. Wait and see.

jennontheisland
11-10-2009, 06:46 AM
I wonder if they'll accept m/m romance.

Selah March
11-10-2009, 06:47 AM
I wondering if they'll accept m/m romance.

They do. It's in their submission guidelines.

"We welcome everything from the very sweet to the incredibly sexy, featuring couples (or multiples) from all walks of life and sexual orientation, including same-sex romances."

Link. (http://carinapress.com/?page_id=2)

jennontheisland
11-10-2009, 06:52 AM
Interesting. That's definitely a risk for Harlequin.

ChristineR
11-10-2009, 07:07 AM
A huge portion of e-books are m/m erotic romance though, so it makes sense that they would offer it.

I'd rather have 30% from a respected name like Harlequin or Ellora's Cave than 40% from one of the many, many do-it-yourself e-publishers out there. I've read enough posts on this forum about people selling two copies a year or something like that.

veinglory
11-10-2009, 07:28 AM
The question is whether Harlequin will be successful in this arena. How successful are their Harlequin-brand ebooks?

Nadia
11-10-2009, 09:20 AM
Angela James also said that she believed Carina Press pays twice a year.

That's a long time to wait for $. Most epubs pay monthly or quarterly.

ETA: I got the info from an RD thread.

para
11-10-2009, 02:50 PM
The question is whether Harlequin will be successful in this arena. How successful are their Harlequin-brand ebooks?

They must be making them a lot of money for Harlequin to have set up a ebook press. Harlequin is nothing if not about the bottom line. If the press is not successful I don't doubt it will be shut down in due course. The only benefit for author's (over any other start up press) would be that their work would have been published by HQN and they might get a foot in the door to transfer to the other side of the operation.

The no advance and potentially paying twice a year is troublesome.

Susan Gable
11-10-2009, 05:19 PM
There is however the Harelquin reader base already in place--and since Harlequin titles are also available in eformat this will help increase traffic/sales

The Harlequin "reader base" is NOT that ebook friendly. At this point, the established epubs have a way better "built in reader base."

I can tell you by looking at my royalty statements -- my ebook format is not selling that well.


You also have the backing of a large corporation behind it which means it's not going to be like the majority of small epublishers. So there are some major differences right out of the gate.

I'd be asking a lot more questions first. Like, what is this "higher royalty rate" and is it going to be on "cover price" or net?

And what will the cover prices be, anyway? Since the cover prices of the ebooks they sell now are still pretty close to the cover price for the "real" book.

What other rights will they take in these contracts? If they're only taking the digital rights, that would be a big plus. HQ's regular contracts grab up eveyr right under the sun, including those not yet invented. (That is NOT a sarcastic quip, that's reality.) The reason authors have traded away all these rights is because HQ has always had a MASSIVE distribution system/channels. (That's actually been sort of melting a bit.)

With a new epublishing house, they don't have ANY distribution channels that give them a leg up on the competition at the moment. You've actually got a better distribution system at the established epubs right now.

They're banking on the HQ name to be the draw for new authors.
They're banking on the HQ name to be the draw for readers. But the fact is they ARE already selling ebooks -- and not in any quantity for authors to get excited about. And these are ebooks that DO have something of a "built-in" readership, because they're books for existing lines with built-in readership.

Like ANY new venture, I'd advocate a huge dose of caution. (See Bombshell, Everlasting Love, Next, Red Dress Ink, Flipside, Precious Gems [not a Harlequin venture. That was Kensington.] etc. for more reasons to be cautious of new ventures.) HQ also has a tendency to pull the plugs on things before really giving them a chance to find their readerships. (Sort of like network TV. A new series doesn't get that long to prove itself.)

As with any foray into the publishing world, arm yourself with as much knowledge as you can first. :)

Susan G.

Susan Gable
11-10-2009, 05:22 PM
According to Angela James, 30%.
http://forums.romancedivas.com/index.php?showtopic=58706&view=findpost&p=866031

Higher than the digital royalty on Harlequin's print books (which, as far as I know is 8-10%).

Try 6% to start. Which is also what their print pub authors get for their ebooks right now. (Originally I think we got 30-50%, until it was realized that they were worthwhile rights. Then the contracts got changed. And many, MANY bigwig authors have tried to negotiate this ebook rate, and HQ won't budge. No matter who the author, or their agent.)

Susan G.

JanDarby
11-10-2009, 09:37 PM
I know it's still pre-opening, sort of, but it struck me that the website has one of the biggest red flags we're usually pointing out as a reason to be cautious in dealing with a new publisher: the website is directed to AUTHORS, not readers, and it's justifying its existence in terms of what AUTHORS want, rather than what readers will get from the publisher.

Also, is anyone else underwhelmed by the slogan -- where no great book is untold? Just like the rest of the focus of the site, it comes across as appealing to an insiders' (authors'/editors') view of the world, rather than a reader's view. I know what they mean, because I'm part of the industry (where the frequent complaint is that great stories can't find a home), but the slogan could be misinterpreted by someone less familiar with how publishing works, as if the publisher were saying about each offering: "well, it's no great book, but at least it's told."

Bottom line: what are they offering TO THE READER that existing publishers don't offer? If they're not offering something identifiably (by readers) different/better, then what's going to bring readers to the books?

JD

Richard White
11-10-2009, 10:03 PM
That's a good question, Jan.

It seems like they could have spoken to a few of their established authors to launch the line with some books right out of the gate to build momentum.

As it looks now, it's set up for authors that HQ wouldn't normally publish. What's in it for HQ to set this line up?

Susan Gable
11-10-2009, 10:29 PM
As it looks now, it's set up for authors that HQ wouldn't normally publish. What's in it for HQ to set this line up?

The same thing that's always in it. This is a business. :)

$$$$$

Susan G.

jennontheisland
11-11-2009, 03:47 AM
From the looks of this blog post Carina is being kept very separate from Harlequin.
http://carinapress.com/?p=127


A potential writer wanted to know if Carina Press eBooks will be sold on the eHarlequin.com website. No, we will be building a bookstore for Carina Press and selling through other eRetailers. Why? Because Harlequin offers a very specific promise to its readers and Carina Press is open to a much wider range of editorial.
...

I know people can be a little confused about Carina Press versus Harlequin but just think of it this way: what was Harlequin is still Harlequin.

I'm sure it's for good reason, but with Carina not listed as a line on the eHarlequin site, it may limit reader crossover.

IceCreamEmpress
11-11-2009, 04:27 AM
As it looks now, it's set up for authors that HQ wouldn't normally publish. What's in it for HQ to set this line up?

They want to cut in on the folks who are currently buying from Samhain, Ellora's Cave, Loose Id, and other e-publishers, not cut in on their own existing print market.

Presumably it leverages their existing facilities and staff in expanding to a new market.

Susan Gable
11-11-2009, 05:51 PM
They want to cut in on the folks who are currently buying from Samhain, Ellora's Cave, Loose Id, and other e-publishers, not cut in on their own existing print market.

Presumably it leverages their existing facilities and staff in expanding to a new market.

Oh, goodness, I hope they're not leveraging their existing staff! The staff is spread too thin already! Seriously, I don't know how the eds are keeping their heads above water now. Plus...if they use the same staff, it's going to "muddy" the waters of the "division" between the two. One reason that division is so important is that they will lose their RWA "Recognized Publisher" status if they can't show a clear seperation. There's a huge debate going on in RWA already.

Did anyone catch that what they sell is "editorial?" Is that what other publishers call it, or is it just HQ that calls books "editorial?"

Susan G.

Donna Pudick
11-11-2009, 06:27 PM
Two of our print books have gone to Kindle, one at the same time the print copies came out. A third print book is due to go to Kindle any day now. The royalties have been higher than the print copies, even though sales of those have been brisk.

I don't think the demise of print books is imminent. However, I do think the use of electronic books will escalate, especially with the price of readers going down. Once they get under $200, more folks will buy them. They make wonderful gifts, and the people I know who own them love them.

Some of the editors at the big houses are reading manuscript submissions on their Kindles. I'm not sure how they do that. Does anyone here know?

M.R.J. Le Blanc
11-11-2009, 07:37 PM
Isn't the market that Ellora's Cave, Loose Id and Samhain are in already glutted as it is?

James D. Macdonald
11-11-2009, 09:16 PM
As it looks now, it's set up for authors that HQ wouldn't normally publish. What's in it for HQ to set this line up?

It hasn't failed so often, or so spectacularly, at their level for the guys at corporate to recognize an already-doomed model.

jennontheisland
11-11-2009, 09:46 PM
Did anyone catch that what they sell is "editorial?" Is that what other publishers call it, or is it just HQ that calls books "editorial?"

Susan G.

I figured it was just a euphemistic way of saying "this line will have man-sex". ;)

I see their content as editorial. It's how traditional mid-western American family values are supposed to be. Harlequin sells an ideal. Harlequin decides what that ideal is.

michael_b
11-11-2009, 10:57 PM
Yes, the entire HQ outfit does use the word 'editorial' incorrectly. An 'editorial' is an opinion column written by an editor. This is something they do that I've never understood. What they mean, of course, is 'fiction' not opinion pieces which are typically written for a magazine or newspaper. It's on their main HQ website with the same odd language. I think some publishers try and reinvent the language just to be 'different'.

jennontheisland
11-12-2009, 12:39 AM
Seems reasonable to me.

Harlequin is a brand, much more than Kensington or Avon is. It's important to them to maintain that brand. And making all of the products they produce theirs rather than the author's seems a good way of maintaining the brand. Readers don't buy authors each month. They buy Harlequins.

Susan Gable
11-12-2009, 12:47 AM
Seems reasonable to me.

Harlequin is a brand, much more than Kensington or Avon is. It's important to them to maintain that brand. And making all of the products they produce theirs rather than the author's seems a good way of maintaining the brand. Readers don't buy authors each month. They buy Harlequins.


Sometimes that's true. Sometimes not.

Mac's mom carries a list around with her of authors she likes. I know, cause I'm on that list. <G> (Which is WAY COOL, and something Mac didn't know, either. LOL.) So, again, even within Harlequin, it's sometimes about the author as well.

There are plenty of names that are well-recognized within Harlequin. Trust me, the readers begin to recognize certain names for giving them a certain experience even within the lines.

There are plenty more who've moved outside and become even more widely recognized. (Nora Roberts, Suzanne Brockman, Stephanie Bond, Jennifer Crusie, Debbie Macomber [Debbie still publishes with Mira, though]...)

Susan G.

Unimportant
11-12-2009, 01:38 AM
There are plenty of names that are well-recognized within Harlequin. Trust me, the readers begin to recognize certain names for giving them a certain experience even within the lines.

Sure, but Harlequin readers will give a new author a try knowing that they'll get a certain type of story or reading experience because that new author's book is a Harlequin book. It sounds like Carina is planning to publish stories that would not fit with the Harlequin reader's expectations (as Jenn said, man-sex, among other things) so Harlequin would be shooting itself in the foot if they put Carina books forward under the Harlequin name, because readers would be bound to try them and be disappointed. Harlequin would be nuts to take a chance on alienating some of its readers.

I agree that Carina is probably Harlequin's way of dipping into the Ellora's Cave audience without risking much money or name brand consciousness.

Haunted_October
11-12-2009, 02:40 AM
This was an answer on their blog today.

Question: I saw that the ‘higher royalty’ rate is 30%. How is that higher? Most e-publishers use a 30%-40% royalty rate right now. At least the ones I’ve seen. I’m a little concerned with that.

Answer: I also want to point out our royalty is based on the COVER PRICE and not NET. We believe the cover price is transparent to the author — there are no odd costs added to it (as can be done with net). So, if the book is priced at $5.99 the author receives her percentage of that.

Even if Carina Press bookstore discounts the price for a sale or on a regular basis, the author still receives her royalty percentage of the $5.99 cover price.

There was a comment before the answer, so that's why it starts with 'I also want..."

mlhernandez
11-12-2009, 04:34 AM
Question: I saw that the ‘higher royalty’ rate is 30%. How is that higher? Most e-publishers use a 30%-40% royalty rate right now. At least the ones I’ve seen. I’m a little concerned with that.

Answer: I also want to point out our royalty is based on the COVER PRICE and not NET. We believe the cover price is transparent to the author — there are no odd costs added to it (as can be done with net).




That's sort of a non-answer. All of the big e-pubs who pay 35% or more pay on cover price. Paying on net is NOT the the norm so to say that Carina is somehow different because they pay 30% on cover is misleading.

jennontheisland
11-12-2009, 05:41 AM
For some things they will likely be paying on "net". Third party distribution sites typically get their cut before the author's royalty is calculated.

This is industry standard as far as I know, and while their full rate on sale books may be a novel decision (but really, how often do ebooks go on sale?), I can't see them giving full rate to an author after they've already handed over 30% to the distribution system.

para
11-12-2009, 08:21 AM
Didn't something like this come up with the now defunct Quartet Press? When is gross net or something? Not to revisit the whole thing but were some authors quite insistent that they were paid gross but when you got down into it, they were paid gross minus certain fees (which sounds a lot like net but by another name)?

michael_b
11-12-2009, 09:47 AM
For some things they will likely be paying on "net". Third party distribution sites typically get their cut before the author's royalty is calculated. I can't see them giving full rate to an author after they've already handed over 30% to the distribution system.

I hate to tell you this, but MOST distributors take 60%, not 30%. (FYI Smashwords takes 15%, but they also deduct the processing fee.) This is one of the things that likely killed Quartet, I don't think they realized that distributors take the lion's share of the cover price just as they do in print. With Fictionwise that '60%' can often add up to more than 80% of the cover price when they've got one of their small press killing sales going on. I've actually gotten paid a whopping .10 cents per sale on a $1.99 book by the time Fictionwise has deducted the sale cost then taken their distribution cut and my publisher took their portion.

michael_b
11-12-2009, 09:48 AM
Didn't something like this come up with the now defunct Quartet Press? When is gross net or something? Not to revisit the whole thing but were some authors quite insistent that they were paid gross but when you got down into it, they were paid gross minus certain fees (which sounds a lot like net but by another name)?

Since Quartet never actually put out a book it would be hard to say what they paid on.

mlhernandez
11-12-2009, 09:58 AM
Didn't something like this come up with the now defunct Quartet Press? When is gross net or something? Not to revisit the whole thing but were some authors quite insistent that they were paid gross but when you got down into it, they were paid gross minus certain fees (which sounds a lot like net but by another name)?

Yes. There was a lot of confusion on net and gross as defined by Quartet. Most epubbed authors I know expect to receive royalties on cover price from their publisher's site and net royalties from third party sites (Fictionwise, etc.) It's the net royalties from a pub's direct sales on site that is odd.

MacAllister
11-12-2009, 10:12 AM
Mac's mom carries a list around with her of authors she likes. I know, cause I'm on that list. <G> (Which is WAY COOL, and something Mac didn't know, either. LOL.) So, again, even within Harlequin, it's sometimes about the author as well.

There are plenty of names that are well-recognized within Harlequin. Trust me, the readers begin to recognize certain names for giving them a certain experience even within the lines.

There are plenty more who've moved outside and become even more widely recognized. (Nora Roberts, Suzanne Brockman, Stephanie Bond, Jennifer Crusie, Debbie Macomber [Debbie still publishes with Mira, though]...)

Susan tells it true, here.

What's hard to quantify OR qualify is word of mouth. But my mom is one of those people who is happiest when she's turning other people on to her favorite authors and books. I have NO idea how many copies of the various Nora Roberts and other favorite authors' series romance novels she bought over the years -- but still if she sees an old Roberts book she remembers loving, she'll buy it to give away or donate. And she's a faithful pre-order-er.

Those are the kind of readers who are worth a lot more than the handful of hardbacks they buy every year, and the bagfuls of paperbacks they buy every month, because they're a completely unpaid sales-force composed of zealots.

(Also, my mom is a force of nature. So if she gives you a book and says "Read this, you'll love it!" You darned well do as you're told.)

Angela James
11-12-2009, 08:35 PM
I scanned through the thread to see if there were any questions I could clear up, but the main thing I saw was the question of royalties. Carina Press will pay royalties on cover price. No net, no fees, just cover price. We avoided net and set the royalties at 30% direct from the website and 15% from 3rd party distributors, and the plan is to distribute through those you could probably list. And yes, 3rd party online distributors take a very, very large slice of the book sales in terms of percentage. It's another thing the publishing industry is really struggling with right now. Everyone wants the largest piece of the pie! It will be interesting to see in the future how it shakes down and if those large distributor percentages stick.

A few other concerns I think were mentioned:

Yep, the website is currently geared towards authors, because there's no way to gear it to readers with no content to offer or share! Our "announcement" of opening was for the publishing industry and authors, so we could start building our list. The site and marketing will change as we get closer to the summer launch. Of course we want readers to take interest in what we're doing, but in these early days, we're going to be focusing on answering questions from authors, since it's hard to build a publishing house without them. You're the key element.

The Carina team is comprised of some existing Harlequin staff, on the marketing/website/digital side of things, but the editing and copy editing will be done by freelance editors and copy editors I hire, so the editorial staff will be separate (and will not be paid on royalty, as many publishers who follow this business model do, but on a flat fee). We'll have a variety of editors interested in all genres. Which leads me to...

Your thoughts on the wide content/genres being acquired: Since I was at Samhain from the beginning, I'm in a unique position to understand how difficult it was to do a general fiction acquisition at the time Samhain opened. But I think it's important to remember that 1) that was several years ago and at the time Samhain went romance only, there was no Kindle, Fictionwise was one of the few online retailers in the game, and erotic romance was practically the only digital product that sold well. Since that time, the digital market and digital industry have exploded and I think the time is ripe for a publisher to step in with fresh, digital-only content that's more than romance. As more readers move to digital reading, they will seek out the content that appeals to them, and there are many, many readers for whom romance doesn't hold appeal, but science fiction, fantasy, mystery, thrillers, etc. do. Does that mean I think it will go gangbusters out of the door? No, but it means I think that the right publisher, willing to take the time and build the audience and the talented authors, can capitalize on a rapidly expanding digital marketplace. And yes, clearly I believe Carina is that press!

Please let me know if I missed something, and I'll try to answer.

JanDarby
11-12-2009, 09:26 PM
the editorial staff will be separate (and will not be paid on royalty, as many publishers who follow this business model do, but on a flat fee).

That does sound encouraging, in that it reflects a financial commitment by the publisher.

JD

MacAllister
11-12-2009, 10:16 PM
Oh good. :) Glad you stopped by, Angela - I was about to drop you a note with a link, and ask if you had time. Thank you!

Susan Gable
11-12-2009, 10:41 PM
Angela, can you address why the twice-a-year royalties, which is how...ummm...old-school <G> (I hate to use traditional LOL) publishing works, instead of quarterly or monthly, which is how a lot of the epub only publishers work?

I mean, with no advance, it's nice for an author to be able to begin earning some money soon after publication, which the other models allow better than the bi-annually model.

So why did they decide to just carry on with the payment schedule they use on the HQ side of things?

Thanks!

Susan G.

Polenth
11-12-2009, 10:48 PM
Please let me know if I missed something, and I'll try to answer.

I have a content question... is there a minimum word count? It says "shorter length stories of less than 50,000 words", but that's a pretty wide range there. Do you mean you'll take short stories or short story collections? Or are you meaning novelish things that don't quite make 50,000 words?

Angela James
11-13-2009, 02:00 AM
Easy answer first: Polenth, we will look at anything as short as around 15k.

Susan's question: It's a really good question, Susan, with a somewhat simple answer: Carina will be using much of Harlequin's back end work flow, to simplify the process and that includes the royalty system. Harlequin's royalty system works very well, authors always get paid on time and correctly, which is important too (at least I think so!) One other thing to keep in mind that will work differently, is that though royalties go out twice a year, you will still get paid for sales made, not just for money that's come in, as most epubs do.

Example: Let's say you sold 10,000 copies of a book on Kindle (oh come on, dream big with me!) but though the sales report has come in letting Carina know of those 10,000 sales, the money hasn't been paid by Amazon yet, when it comes time to pay royalties. Doesn't matter. The author will still get paid for all reported sales.

Unimportant
11-13-2009, 02:28 AM
Thanks for coming on the board to answer questions, Angela. It's much appreciated.

Deb Kinnard
11-13-2009, 02:48 AM
This is probably at least partially off-topic, but what do Fictionwise and the other third-party sellers actually DO that's worth 60% of the purchase price of an e-book? I've visited some of those sites and it looks as though all they do is slap the book's data, intact from the publisher, onto their own site, and hope for good sales.

Jennifer Robins
11-13-2009, 11:57 PM
Hi, Angela,
Would there be an option for print at any time?

Angela James
11-14-2009, 12:03 AM
Jennifer, we aren't ruling that out for the future, but right now are going to focus on digital because that is the main purpose of Carina. There are many options we can explore for print in the future, but just not at this time.

Susan Gable
11-14-2009, 01:37 AM
Jennifer, we aren't ruling that out for the future, but right now are going to focus on digital because that is the main purpose of Carina. There are many options we can explore for print in the future, but just not at this time.

Angela, I "heard" through the grapevine (not the most reliable source. <G>) that the Carina contract is asking for print rights, though.

Can you yea or nay that?

Susan G.

Angela James
11-14-2009, 02:28 AM
Yes, true. The rights are similar to the Harlequin contract.

Unimportant
11-14-2009, 02:48 AM
Ouch. I think that's going to be a deal-breaker for a lot of authors.

Why does Carina want print rights when they're raison d'etre is "I think the time is ripe for a publisher to step in with fresh, digital-only content"? It might make more sense for Carina to have a ROFR/options clause on print rights if e-book sales hit a set threshhold.

Bushdoctor
11-14-2009, 04:24 AM
My main worry is this is just another case of the big boys trying to muscle out the little guys. I mean most of the epublishers I know are small time micropresses and with these guys comming in, what chance do they have?

Deb Kinnard
11-14-2009, 04:27 AM
Bushdoctor, in my (only 7 years) experience, that will be largely driven by content and quality. For example, people who buy from my current publisher may or may not browse Carina's offerings. Desert Breeze specializes in "sweet" or "warm" romance, while I hear Carina will not be limited to that end of the continuum.

I think a small time micropress has just as much chance as the quality, and its ability to get the word out, will give it. It's a whole new world for e-publishing, and daily expanding its borders.

Bushdoctor
11-14-2009, 04:38 AM
Bushdoctor, in my (only 7 years) experience, that will be largely driven by content and quality. For example, people who buy from my current publisher may or may not browse Carina's offerings. Desert Breeze specializes in "sweet" or "warm" romance, while I hear Carina will not be limited to that end of the continuum.

I think a small time micropress has just as much chance as the quality, and its ability to get the word out, will give it. It's a whole new world for e-publishing, and daily expanding its borders.

My main worry Deb is that others will follow Carina. To use an analogy - small independent shops sometimes get put out of business by large retailers like Tesco and Asda. If players like Carina expand the market that will be great news, but if the are going to eat into the existing market then the micropresses are done for. For example I assume they will be more effective at marketing given their contacts and financial backing.
The other thing I am concerned about is the authors. I am not published, it is a tough industry and the small micropresses seem more willing to engage with authors like myself who find it hard to break into the mainstream. If the huge publishers get to dominate the digital market, what will that mean for writers like us at the bottom of the food chain?

Susan Gable
11-14-2009, 05:49 AM
Yes, true. The rights are similar to the Harlequin contract.

So, not just the epub and print rights, but pretty much all rights?

Thank you for your willingness to answer our questions, Angela!

Susan G.

Angela James
11-14-2009, 05:08 PM
Ouch. I think that's going to be a deal-breaker for a lot of authors.

Why does Carina want print rights when they're raison d'etre is "I think the time is ripe for a publisher to step in with fresh, digital-only content"? It might make more sense for Carina to have a ROFR/options clause on print rights if e-book sales hit a set threshhold.

http://pubrants.blogspot.com/2009/11/when-no-compete-clause-comes-into-play.html

I'm not trying to give a non-answer, but I read this post yesterday and I thought it was a nice lightbulb moment (for me), about publishers taking digital/print rights and the no-compete clause.

About setting a sales threshold, the one thing I have to say, from my years of doing this, is that sales threshold in digital is no indication of how it will do in print. Possibly that will change as digital becomes more mainstream, but right now books that sell not-so-well in digital can sell gangbusters in print and vice versa.

Angela James
11-14-2009, 05:11 PM
So, not just the epub and print rights, but pretty much all rights?

Thank you for your willingness to answer our questions, Angela!

Susan G.

There's a bit more on this here: http://carinapress.com/?p=140

And I apologize if anyone thinks I'm being cagey, but answering questions for Carina/Harlequin is much harder than where I've worked previously because they're a larger corporation and have a whole lot of policies about these things!

Stew21
11-14-2009, 05:30 PM
thanks for being so helpful, Angela. We really appreciate it.

Susan Gable
11-14-2009, 05:33 PM
So, not just the epub and print rights, but pretty much all rights?
.

To make it easier for others interested in this, I went to the link Angela helpfully shared with us.

It states that Carina will be buying ALL rights.

Susan G.

Eirin
11-14-2009, 06:43 PM
It states that Carina will be buying ALL rights.


Oy.

I know Harlequin is notorious for rights grabbing in their contracts, but come on. With no current plan for exploiting print rights, taking those rights is unreasonable. And what are the chances of selling movie rights for a book without print exposure? Like it or not, the print audience is, at this time, much larger than the digital one. Without even an advance, a global rights grab is just draconian.

I'm not up on RWA rules, but will a sale to a non-advance paying publisher at least make the writer eligible for RWA membership?

Susan Gable
11-14-2009, 07:14 PM
I'm not up on RWA rules, but will a sale to a non-advance paying publisher at least make the writer eligible for RWA membership?

Anyone who is "seriously pursuing publication" can join RWA. Unpubs are welcome.

To qualify for PAN (Published Author Network of RWA), the writer will have to prove they've made...I think it's $1,000.00...off the sale of ONE book. (In other words, no combining money from several books to get to $1,000.00) The qualifications have changed recently, and I'm not precisely up-to-date on them.

Carina will NOT qualify (under current RWA standards) as a "Recognized Publisher." Only Recognized publishers are allowed to take appointments and do other "official" things at RWA National. To be a Recognized Publisher, the publisher must offer an advance of at least $1,000 to each and every author.

Susan G.

Unimportant
11-14-2009, 11:15 PM
Angela, can you tell us how long the contract runs for? All rights might not be so bad if it's only for two or three years.

Thanks again!

Unimportant
11-14-2009, 11:32 PM
http://pubrants.blogspot.com/2009/11/when-no-compete-clause-comes-into-play.html

I'm not trying to give a non-answer, but I read this post yesterday and I thought it was a nice lightbulb moment (for me), about publishers taking digital/print rights and the no-compete clause.

Thanks, Angela. Yes, that made the light bulb go off for me, too -- in a cornea-burning kind of way.

Bushdoctor
01-11-2010, 05:22 PM
has anyone been signed by these guys yet?

Lainey Bancroft
01-11-2010, 05:42 PM
The stats from the Carina Press Blog (http://carinapress.com/2010/01/submissions-update/)

19 acquisitions to date, including names I recognized, Lauren Dane, Carrie Lofty.

mlhernandez
01-11-2010, 08:33 PM
The stats from the Carina Press Blog (http://carinapress.com/2010/01/submissions-update/)

19 acquisitions to date, including names I recognized, Lauren Dane, Carrie Lofty.

I am super impressed with the acquisitions showcased on the blog so far. I can't wait to get my hands on some of these books!

Bushdoctor
01-11-2010, 10:46 PM
Manuscripts offered contracts to date: 19
Rejections sent to date: 198
Revise/resubmit letters sent: 10 (0 returned so far, but I’ll remain hopeful since it’s still early days)
I have another batch of probably forty rejection letters to send and 2 new contract offers to deliver with more coming next week! Yay! That puts us at about 8% acceptance, which is actually pretty high, so I’m impressed with that number, especially considering the stringent approval process these books are being put through.


These are really good acceptance rates

Lainey Bancroft
01-12-2010, 01:50 AM
These are really good acceptance rates

I would venture a guess that Carina's earliest submissions were a cut above ordinary slush. Meaning, because they are so new, chances are a good percentage of subs came from already epubbed authors with their eyes on the market, as opposed to first time submitters.

Also, Angela James is well networked and highly respected in the online romance community, so an experienced author who might hesitate to submit to a new publisher would not hesitate to submit to Angela.

Bushdoctor
01-12-2010, 02:26 AM
I would venture a guess that Carina's earliest submissions were a cut above ordinary slush. Meaning, because they are so new, chances are a good percentage of subs came from already epubbed authors with their eyes on the market, as opposed to first time submitters.

Also, Angela James is well networked and highly respected in the online romance community, so an experienced author who might hesitate to submit to a new publisher would not hesitate to submit to Angela.

I think that is an apt hypothesis. It is very good though that they release such information, it shows a level of transparency.

brainstorm77
05-03-2010, 01:49 AM
Bumping for those who may want to read.

jennontheisland
05-03-2010, 01:52 AM
I would venture a guess that Carina's earliest submissions were a cut above ordinary slush. Meaning, because they are so new, chances are a good percentage of subs came from already epubbed authors with their eyes on the market, as opposed to first time submitters.

Also, Angela James is well networked and highly respected in the online romance community, so an experienced author who might hesitate to submit to a new publisher would not hesitate to submit to Angela.
And yet Quartet Press closed before it even opened.

Carina is a new epub with what appears to be a high acceptance rate.

brainstorm77
05-03-2010, 01:53 AM
Yeah, what happened with that?

jennontheisland
05-03-2010, 01:59 AM
Yeah, what happened with that?
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=150769


And in particular:
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3946074&postcount=9
and
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=4021588&postcount=28

Angela James
05-03-2010, 02:12 AM
Carina is a new epub with what appears to be a high acceptance rate.

Our acceptance rate is 5% from the slush pile, 7-8% overall. It's been pretty well documented on our blog, so it's not a secret, but I'm very surprised to hear you think that's a high acceptance rate, especially for a digital publisher releasing all genres of fiction. I don't know of many other publishers who back up their stated acceptance rates with actual numbers, so you also know I'm not playing them either up or down.

Angela James
05-03-2010, 02:14 AM
And yet Quartet Press closed before it even opened.


I guess I have to ask...I was an employee of that publisher for only three weeks, so I'm not sure what you mean by this?

jennontheisland
05-03-2010, 10:16 PM
I guess I have to ask...I was an employee of that publisher for only three weeks, so I'm not sure what you mean by this?
That despite the names and experience behind it, it closed. Another epublisher that didn't last a year, and so many people thought it was a sure thing. All the more reason to wait and see what will happen with Carina. Which also has a big name behind it.

I understand the appeal of names, but publishers close for all kinds of reasons. And a new epub is a new epub and should be treated as such regardless of who opened it.

Angela James
05-03-2010, 10:19 PM
I totally understand. Thanks for clarifying!

iwannabepublished
05-26-2010, 02:08 AM
I came across this e-publisher on the Query Tracker web site. P&E does not list them. A quick search came up with it was launched Nov 9, 2009 by Harlequin. They do not now, but may get into print publishing. Website is http://carinapress.com/.

Another question I have is will e-publishing (with a 'legitimate" [not vanity of self-publishing] publisher) have a negative impact on getting an agent for print publishing later?

brainstorm77
05-26-2010, 02:09 AM
<moot link snipped> there is already a lengthy thread here on them.

nkkingston
05-26-2010, 02:09 PM
It looks like the first slew of books are due out next month, judging by the promotion thread over on Dear Author (well, that and Carina's website says so!). It'll be interesting to see how the website changes. Obviously, with no books currently for sale there's no relevant page, but presumably that'll change on the launch date. I wonder if it'll start pitching harder to readers, since at the moment it's still pitching to potential authors.

Erin
05-26-2010, 08:25 PM
It looks like the first slew of books are due out next month, judging by the promotion thread over on Dear Author (well, that and Carina's website says so!). It'll be interesting to see how the website changes. Obviously, with no books currently for sale there's no relevant page, but presumably that'll change on the launch date. I wonder if it'll start pitching harder to readers, since at the moment it's still pitching to potential authors.

From what I read on their web/blog, the website will change at launch and look more like a bookstore. I got a Harlequin email newsletter last week and it had a Carina banner & link in it. I thought it was a good sign that they're marketing to their readers already. They may have been doing this for a while, but I'd just signed up for the weekly newsletter.

brainstorm77
05-26-2010, 10:01 PM
Just got a rejection on my novella from Angela James. It didn't meet their current needs, but stated to feel free to submit again in the future, sounds like a form reject to me. Wait time for me was three weeks to hear from them.

Robin Bayne
05-27-2010, 08:33 PM
Just got a rejection on my novella from Angela James. It didn't meet their current needs, but stated to feel free to submit again in the future, sounds like a form reject to me. Wait time for me was three weeks to hear from them.


I think I got the same form letter yesterday.

brainstorm77
05-27-2010, 09:05 PM
I think I got the same form letter yesterday.

I found a entry on Carina's blog, they rarely send out personalized rejections. The letter was basic.


Dear *****,


Thank you for submitting ******* to Carina Press, and for your patience while the acquisitions team reviewed your full manuscript.

Unfortunately, after careful consideration of your manuscript, we have determined that it does not fit our needs.
Though we aren’t able to accept this manuscript, it is always possible that future manuscripts may find a home with us, and we hope you’ll consider us for future submissions. Additionally, please remember that publishing is quite subjective, and what doesn’t work for one publisher may work for another so we wish you the best of luck in placing this manuscript elsewhere.

Thank you for your interest in working with Carina Press.


Angela James
Executive Editor, Carina Press
www.carinapress.com

Robin Bayne
06-01-2010, 01:50 AM
Yep, that's the one.

brainstorm77
06-01-2010, 01:52 AM
Yep, that's the one.:D I wonder if they really read the full manuscript...:tongue

Lainey Bancroft
06-01-2010, 03:20 AM
:D I wonder if they really read the full manuscript...:tongue

It doesn't always require a read of a full ms to give it "careful consideration" sometimes content that just isn't what they're looking for or plot holes can leap right out of a synopsis or first chapter.

I got the same 'R' on my choose your own adventure novella after about the 11-12 week mark. Not a big sting as this was an experimental venture for me, never having written (or read) cyoa, but all is not lost. I really, really like one thread of the adventure so I think I'll paste it together and go with it.:)

(not to submit to Carina, of course, since the form R does not in any way suggest a revise and resub)

brainstorm77
06-01-2010, 03:26 AM
I'm going to wait before subbing anything else... Just to see how things pan out for them.

iwannabepublished
06-01-2010, 06:24 PM
I could not find anything on their web site about rights so I asked. Here is what Angela James, Executive Editor, wrote back " We do not contract only digital rights, but request full worldwide rights within the contract." Can someone explain this to me? If this is an e-publisher, why do they require worldwide rights? Doesn't this mean that an author that signs this contract can never attempt to have their work published in print without the permission of Carina Press? I understand that they will be spending money to edit and perhaps promote. Is this kind of transfer of full rights normal for an e-publisher to request? And there's that sticky word 'request'. Does that mean these rights are negotiable?

priceless1
06-01-2010, 07:19 PM
" We do not contract only digital rights, but request full worldwide rights within the contract." Can someone explain this to me? If this is an e-publisher, why do they require worldwide rights?

Wanna, when uploading an e-book, say to Amazon's Kindle, they ask which rights you have, US/Canada, worldwide, etc. It's a simple click. That means anyone in the world can order your e-book for their Kindle. I assume it's the same for all the online databases.

Print rights are a whole other banana, and those rights are negotiable. If the publisher doesn't have worldwide distribution or the ability to sell the foreign rights [and there is a whole psychology to this], it makes little sense to insist on retaining those rights.


Doesn't this mean that an author that signs this contract can never attempt to have their work published in print without the permission of Carina Press?
If their contract is strictly for e-rights, then you still retain the print rights -they're two different animals. But beware, there is some danger in having two different publishers. I suggest you read a blog post (http://behlerblog.wordpress.com/2010/05/27/i-want-to-keep-my-e-book-rights/) I wrote last week on this very topic. It's a bit in reverse of your particular boggle, but the general information still applies.

I understand that they will be spending money to edit and perhaps promote. Is this kind of transfer of full rights normal for an e-publisher to request? And there's that sticky word 'request'. Does that mean these rights are negotiable?
I'm not quite sure what you mean "full rights." Worldwide e-rights isn't unusual because the online e-book sites go worldwide. Think of the nightmare when telling someone who clicked into Amazon.com to buy your e-book but happens to live in the UK. Without worldwide rights, they can't have the e-book.

Anything in a contract is negotiable, but you have to be aware of the advantages and disadvantages of making one decision over another.

jennontheisland
06-01-2010, 08:48 PM
I could not find anything on their web site about rights so I asked. Here is what Angela James, Executive Editor, wrote back " We do not contract only digital rights, but request full worldwide rights within the contract." Can someone explain this to me? If this is an e-publisher, why do they require worldwide rights?

Because it's Harlequin and that's part of their boilerplate contract that has been carried over to Carina.

Robin Bayne
06-01-2010, 08:51 PM
:D I wonder if they really read the full manuscript...:tongue



:D

Susan Gable
06-01-2010, 09:09 PM
When Harlequin says full rights, most times they mean FULL rights, including those rights not yet invented. (I kid not -- there is a line in the contract that says something like that. So whatever the ebook of the future is...I dunno, hologram books or something...that hasn't been invented just yet...those rights are granted HQ in the boilerplate contract. TV, audio...FULL rights.)

Susan G.

priceless1
06-01-2010, 09:50 PM
When Harlequin says full rights, most times they mean FULL rights, including those rights not yet invented. (I kid not -- there is a line in the contract that says something like that. So whatever the ebook of the future is...I dunno, hologram books or something...that hasn't been invented just yet...those rights are granted HQ in the boilerplate contract. TV, audio...FULL rights.)

Susan G.
Good grief, how whack is that?

brainstorm77
06-01-2010, 09:55 PM
Also note that in the Carina blog, it's been stated that while they are right now a e pub, print books may become a reality in the future.

jennontheisland
06-01-2010, 10:03 PM
Good grief, how whack is that?
No other publisher on the planet could get away with that kind of grab, I know.


Also note that in the Carina blog, it's been stated that while they are right now a e pub, print books may become a reality in the future.
Every new e-pub says this.

brainstorm77
06-01-2010, 10:05 PM
No other publisher on the planet could get away with that kind of grab, I know.


Every new e-pub says this.

I'm talking about Carina and what they have posted. And that is a generalization that I am not inclined to believe. There are e pubs are are strictly that and have no intention of ever going into print.
As for contracts and HQ, I suggest that if an author is not please with the way HQ does business, don't sign with them.

iwannabepublished
06-01-2010, 10:55 PM
Based on all of the above comments it seems to me an author would be boxing him/herself into a corner if they went with Carina Press. Carina would own all of the rights and even if your e-publication did well you might never see it in print. And there's nothing you can really do about it. Unless, of course, they really do go through with the idea of going to print and even then your book might not be selected. I haven't had anything published yet and I guess e-publishing is better then nothing but I still would like to be able to see my book on a shelf, at least my own. By the way Priceless1, I did read your blog and it is very enlightening.

veinglory
06-01-2010, 11:35 PM
If you are epublishing, you are epublishing. So IMHO you are putting yourself in that box deliberately and have no basis for complaining that had hadn't realised what kind of box it was. Epublishers vary on which rights they take and which they always, often or sometimes exploit. If you epublish first the odds are most publishers will not want print rights only, but there are exceptions and I suppose you could self-publish it. Bottom line, if you want to print publish it would pay to tackle that goal first and foremost.

KathleenD
06-02-2010, 12:11 AM
"Epublishing is better than nothing"

Wow.

I wrote a post, walked away, deleted it, wrote another, walked away, and decided to go ahead and post after a few edits.

I understand that many people have this point of view, and further that many people believe that *any* print publication is superior to epub.

And that's fine. Meanwhile, I and thousands of others will collect royalty checks for our work from a niche that is expanding even as other publishers are cutting authors and titles.

Seriously, I don't understand why someone with a negative attitude towards epubbing would even be in the Carina Press (Harlequin's explicitly digital imprint) thread in the first place.

But just in case it was ignorance, not rudeness: Many people write stories that are unlikely to see print publication due to length, theme, or some other element of the story. Other people need to earn money from writing a hell of a lot faster than traditional publishing can possibly offer. For us, digital publication is our first choice, not our last choice.

Should you ever find yourself having written a contemporary erotic novella with a parallel universe plot, you won't even bother with New York. ;)

mscelina
06-02-2010, 12:32 AM
Amen, Kathleen. E publishing is not only legit, it's gaining immense respect. At the agent workshop at RT, agents like Ethan Ellenberg, Miriam Kriss and Jim McCarthy all listed e-pubbed books (with legitimate e-publishers, not self-pubbed) as acceptable credits in a writer's publishing history.

Might want to do some fact-checking before you start talking about e-pubbing being better than nothing or implying that these aren't legitimate publishing credits. E published novels pay the mortgage on my house--which is something that a lot of "real" authors can't say.

Jersey Chick
06-02-2010, 12:37 AM
**stares down at the now-open can of worms**

I guess epublishing is better than nothing? No - I did NOT just read that, did I?

Saanen
06-02-2010, 03:36 AM
Regarding the "epublishing is better than nothing" issue, I suspect a big part of it comes from the books not being on bookshelves, which means the author has to explain to friends and family that the book is only available online, which the clueless will interpret as being not really published. Add in the scads of micro-epublishers whose books will never be read except by the authors' friends and family, the way big publishers have been treating ebooks until very recently (as either a threat or an afterthought), and the DRM wars and high-priced readers that have caused a lot of people to shy away from ebooks, and no wonder even a lot of writers think of epublishing as second best.

I suspect it also has something to do with genre. Erotica and romance readers have been early and enthusiastic adopters of the ebook, while other genres are still lagging a bit behind.

Speaking of which--to nudge my post back on topic--Carina's emphasis seems to be really strongly on romance/erotica. That's natural, I guess, considering they're a spin-off of Harlequin, but I had hopes that their SF/F ebooks would be worth reading. I sent them a fantasy manuscript a few weeks ago, but I don't think it's got enough romantic elements to interest them. I've been checking their blog posts on and off, and almost every single book they've announced has been romance in one way or another.

michael_b
06-02-2010, 04:09 AM
Saanen,

Thanks for the update on what they really seem to want. It's probably hard for them to break the romance/erotic romance mold over there considering who is behind them and what their editors are used to accepting.

Selah March
06-02-2010, 04:32 AM
Some hard numbers from an epublished author. (http://marieharte.blogspot.com/2010/05/just-how-much-money-can-you-make.html)

KathleenD
06-02-2010, 04:39 AM
One quarter of the 38 launch titles are not romance.

An additional five titles are SF/F Romance, meaning there is a romantic relationship at the heart of those stories - which I would argue is true of many of Robert Heinlein and Anne McCaffrey's works.

Just over a quarter of the launch titles are erotic romance.

I don't know about the breakdown of the acquisitions since then, though.

So yeah, heavily tilted in favor of the genres already embraced by ebook readers, but a healthy chunk isn't! Everyone's hoping to grow the market, not just cannibalize existing audiences.

brainstorm77
06-02-2010, 04:47 AM
Some hard numbers from an epublished author. (http://marieharte.blogspot.com/2010/05/just-how-much-money-can-you-make.html)

Good link, thanks.

Saanen
06-02-2010, 05:13 AM
Some hard numbers from an epublished author. (http://marieharte.blogspot.com/2010/05/just-how-much-money-can-you-make.html)

That's interesting, and awesome for that particular writer, but I don't know very many people who can crank out 35 books in five years. I'm a fast writer, but if I manage one full-length book (meaning 75-125k) and one novella (under 75k) a year, I feel like I'm doing very well.

Saanen
06-02-2010, 05:20 AM
Saanen,

Thanks for the update on what they really seem to want. It's probably hard for them to break the romance/erotic romance mold over there considering who is behind them and what their editors are used to accepting.

Oh, well, it was just a guess based on what I've seen on their blog and website (for one thing, their guidelines state "We expect to publish a majority of romance and erotic romance"). KathleenD says above that 1/4 of their launch titles are not romance, although I couldn't find that information on their website (not that I looked very hard). They're going live for sales next week, I think, so hopefully they'll have good stories in the SF/F line that aren't just romances with blasters or dragons. :)

brainstorm77
06-02-2010, 05:29 AM
That's interesting, and awesome for that particular writer, but I don't know very many people who can crank out 35 books in five years. I'm a fast writer, but if I manage one full-length book (meaning 75-125k) and one novella (under 75k) a year, I feel like I'm doing very well.

You consider anything under 75K a novella? The thing is some people do write fast; I know many who do. I suggest reading the thread on writing speed in the Novels section. It shows the variations of people and how fast or not they write.

Saanen
06-02-2010, 05:57 AM
Well, I write fantasy, so it's hard to find markets for anything under about 75k (many publishers won't even look at fantasy novels under 100k). I do realize lots of writers are extremely fast, but I still don't think most writers can manage 35 books in five years. Even if the books are more novella length--say 25k each for simplicity's sake--that's still a total of around 875,000 words, or (if my math skills aren't failing me completely) about 175,000 words a year. I don't doubt that it's possible for some writers to keep up that kind of pace and still produce well-written books, but I don't believe most writers can.

brainstorm77
06-02-2010, 06:20 AM
It's all totally individual, depending on the situation. If I didn't work a 'day job' I could write five books a year. It wouldn't be a problem. Anyway, this is just derailing the thread. :) I see your point and can understand where you are coming from.

veinglory
06-02-2010, 06:32 AM
That's interesting, and awesome for that particular writer, but I don't know very many people who can crank out 35 books in five years. I'm a fast writer, but if I manage one full-length book (meaning 75-125k) and one novella (under 75k) a year, I feel like I'm doing very well.

Ebooks are quite commonly only 20-40,000 words with a linear plot. If I was writing full time I could problably produce more than one per month fairly easily--and I am not a fast writer. I expect that would earn enough to live on.

Stlight
06-02-2010, 07:35 AM
I was interested in the rights HQ wanted, just as general information, not as an e-book thing or as a print thing, but as a HQ thing. The other general knowledge I've picke dup about HQ is they aren't inclined to negociate. Maybe I'm misinformed about that.

I don't think it was a bad mini-discussion, nor do I see why wanting to know that means the author shouldn't consider submitting to Carina or HQ. I may not have the right line on this, but I thought it was better to submit to a publisher when you understood not only what they wanted, but how they run their business. Of course, I could be wrong about that.

Would any of this matter if I had a book to sub to HQ? Of course not, their guidelines are so specific that anything you wrote to submit to them would need to be to a large extent re-written to fit another publisher. Again, I maybe reading all the guidelines wrong.

brainstorm77
06-02-2010, 07:46 AM
[QUOTE=Stlight;5010773]

I don't think it was a bad mini-discussion, nor do I see why wanting to know that means the author shouldn't consider submitting to Carina or HQ. QUOTE]

I don't think anyone said that? I think the issue was, if you are inclined to see e pubs as second rate, then it's best to not go with them. I have no issue with e pubs and am currently subbing to them.
If you do have issue with the contract with HQ or anyone then don't sign. I don't think anyone here in this thread has an issue with anyone questioning any publishers contract. :)

nkkingston
06-02-2010, 01:07 PM
The impression I get from various posts and blogs about Harlequin is that their terms aren't quite as draconian as they used to be (which is a little frightening!), but they've still got enough of the market cornered that most authors are willing to accept terms from them that they wouldn't elsewhere. As pointed out above, if you've written a Harlequin style novel, you're going to struggle to sell it anywhere else anyway.

It makes sense to me that this would carry over to Carina, though with a wider choice when it comes to epubs it may not always be in the author's best interests as it would be with Harlequin. You've got the Harlequin contract without the explicit Harlequin branding - will you get the Harlequin sales figures? I'm still annoyed they haven't put their name to it, tbh, though I am looking forward to reading some of the non-romance books. It would be great to see that side of the market grow a little more.

ChristineR
06-02-2010, 04:15 PM
One hundred and seventy five thousand words a year works out to 700 words a day. That's not a lot for a full time writer. Remember, these are very straightforward books with linear plots and lots of sex scenes. Now many writers (including myself) find sex hard to write, but you can get a lot of words out of minimal thought in them.

Plus, nobody starts out writing tons a day. It takes practice, like everything else.

KathleenD
06-02-2010, 04:54 PM
*whacks head into keyboard*

A sex scene is composed of words that need to go into a particular order to achieve a particular effect that strengthens characterization and moves the plot forward.

In other words, it is like every other scene in the book, and is no easier/harder to write than any other scene in the book. Even if you can write sex. The implication that one can get "a lot of words out of minimal thought" is tremendously insulting.

I don't claim to be writing Hamlet, here, but I didn't wake up this morning and think, "Oh, la, today I shall crap out 20K words of smut because it's so much easier and simpler than writing something else."

As Stephen King said when someone asked him why he wrote what he wrote, "What makes you think I have any choice?"

If you would like to discuss it further, please come on over to the Erotica forum.

scarletpeaches
06-02-2010, 04:57 PM
One hundred and seventy five thousand words a year works out to 700 words a day. That's not a lot for a full time writer. Remember, these are very straightforward books with linear plots and lots of sex scenes. Now many writers (including myself) find sex hard to write, but you can get a lot of words out of minimal thought in them.

Plus, nobody starts out writing tons a day. It takes practice, like everything else.Uh...WHUT? :Jaw:

PS: If they take minimal thought, what does it say that you still find them hard to write?

thethinker42
06-02-2010, 05:02 PM
A sex scene is composed of words that need to go into a particular order to achiever a particular effect that strengthens characterization and moves the plot forward.

In other words, it is like every other scene in the book, and is no easier/harder to write than any other scene in the book. Even if you can write sex. The implication that one can get "a lot of words out of minimal thought" is tremendously insulting.


Uh...WHUT? :Jaw:

PS: If they take minimal thought, what does it say that you still find them hard to write?

I'm with both of you.

Jersey Chick
06-02-2010, 05:07 PM
**looks at second can of opened worms**

Please, for the love of dog, don't generalize in a way that is insulting to an entire genre of writers by doing the ol' "pfft... it's just a formulaic plot to fill in the spaces between mindless sex scenes."

I choose my words pretty carefully to avoid sex scenes being just another sex scene. Sometimes they are the hardest to write NOT because it's sex, but because it has to further the plot without just being added words.

I don't know about the Carina ebooks, but HQ's other lines aren't all linear plot with lots of sex scenes, either.

yeesh.

ChristineR
06-02-2010, 05:13 PM
Sorry, but you guys are misunderstanding what I'm saying, and I'm not going to say anything more.

Darklite
06-02-2010, 05:16 PM
Now many writers (including myself) find sex hard to write, but you can get a lot of words out of minimal thought in them.

Absolute bollocks. I'm a university student and I put about 100 times more thought into my sex scenes than I do in a 2000 word essay on Hamlet. I find sex incredibly difficult to write, and if I could toss out a 700 word sex scene every day I'd be pretty bloody pleased with myself.

And I'm getting tired of those posters around here who look down their noses at us e-pubbed erotica writers. I'm proud of what I write. And I put a lot of thought into my books, the sex scenes most of all.

scarletpeaches
06-02-2010, 05:18 PM
Sorry, but you guys are misunderstanding what I'm saying, and I'm not going to say anything more.Surely if we're misunderstanding, the best thing to do would be to explain what you meant so we don't misunderstand?

For the record I find sex scenes easy to write. Certain sexual acts are more difficult than others, but in the main? They're a hell of a lot of fun.

What's even more so is the build up.

kaitie
06-02-2010, 05:26 PM
I just wanted to say I work my ass off and 700 words a day is tough for me sometimes. Some of us are slow. :/

Angela James
06-02-2010, 05:30 PM
Re: what we want/don't want. If we didn't want non-romance books, we would say so (I'm very good at saying no :P) I explained this to someone who sent me a response to a rejection last week, stating that I clearly must not be acquiring their genre since I didn't accept their book and the launch titles seem heavily weighted towards romance or romantic elements. That's simply not true.

The truth is, Carina Press is an imprint of Harlequin, so when we first announced our launch, our first and broadest reach was naturally to the existing Harlequin readers and authors interested in writing for Harlequin, since that's who was paying attention. This resulted in quite a bit of romance submissions, or submissions with romantic elements. It's only been in the past 2-3 months (keeping in mind that we've only been acquiring since November, so for about 7 months), as word has spread to authors of other genres more widely, that we've started to see a larger percentage of non-romance submissions. In the past few weeks, we've acquired a handful of non-romance titles (fantasy, sci-fi thriller, mystery, etc) and we will continue to acquire them as quality subs come in. I think you'll find, as time goes on and we move past launch titles, that we will focus on romance (and we've always been honest about that) because romance is a money-making business, but that we won't be focusing on erotic romance, though we are definitely interested in publishing it, and we'll have non-romance releases each month as well.

As for "what the editors are used to acquiring" the editors have a diverse background so they're used to acquiring genres across the board. The editors have worked for Baen, ROC, Berkley, Dorchester, Pocket, Penguin, Samhain, etc. When I hired editors, I was very careful to hire so I had several editors to cover each genre, at the minimum. But in reality, the editors all have very eclectic tastes and read across a variety of genres, and after my initial hiring, I actually had to seek out several more editors who wanted to acquire romance (ironically enough) because the first group of editors had more interest in the non-romance genres.

All that said, I have to stress again that we can only publish genres we get quality submissions in, so if the subs aren't there, we won't publish it. Not because we don't want to, but because we're not able to.

Last, I know there are some questions about the website. On June 7th, next Monday, the website will switch over to a commerce site and become more reader/sale focused. We'll be adding a Coming Soon page as well, and the blog and submission FAQs, which have been the main components of the site since launch and focused more on authors, will become the secondary components and the blog will become a mix of info for readers and authors (currently it's targeted towards readers during the Countdown to launch, but it will become a mix post-launch).

Hopefully that helped clear up some of the questions. If I missed any in skimming the thread, please let me know.

nkkingston
06-02-2010, 06:09 PM
One hundred and seventy five thousand words a year works out to 700 words a day.

I could write 700 words a day, but I couldn't package all those little increments up and just submit them. That would be a horrible novel. I don't know about you, but it takes me about as long to edit a book as it does to write it, so that's a minimum of 1400 words a day. And that's assuming my beta readers have time to read and return ASAP, that there's not more than one major change, and that I don't feel the need to send it back out to the beta readers again after that change. I mean, ideally I'd be working on the next book while this was going on, but it's not easy to switch back and forth between writing one book and editing another.

(though I do appreciate you've included weekends and a two week holiday in that number!)

Put it another way. I can write 2000 words a day, often for weeks in a row before I burn out. The problem is they're not good words.

I'd be very surprised it anyone was hammering out 700 words a day and submitting them as is, though I'd be less so if people with more stamina than me were hitting 2k every day and giving themselves time to edit. They just happen to be the exception, not the rule.


Sorry, but you guys are misunderstanding what I'm saying, and I'm not going to say anything more.

As a writer, surely you're aware that the onus is on you, not us, to make sure you're understood. Even if unintentional, marking remarks like your about romance in a topic about a Harlequin-owned publisher? Did you really think that wouldn't get backs up?

scarletpeaches
06-02-2010, 07:38 PM
I'd be very surprised it anyone was hammering out 700 words a day and submitting them as isI'd be very surprised if anyone subbed their first drafts. Word count and speed is irrelevant.
...though I'd be less so if people with more stamina than me were hitting 2k every day and giving themselves time to edit.Like I said, word count and speed have nothing to do with it. And me? I take days to edit a book. A fortnight at most. So I take far, far less time to edit than I do to write a book and I write fast.
They just happen to be the exception, not the rule.Not in my experience. I know very few writers whose work I enjoy, who would get away with fewer than 700 words a day. Good writers who aim to build a readership have sure as hell got to keep their presence current or they'll be forgotten. 700 words a day is, what, a book every four or five months? That's easily doable.

veinglory
06-02-2010, 07:49 PM
Personally see a little over-sensitivity here. It is my personal experience that ebooks are often shorter and often do have linear plots, and that sex scenes are easier to write because they are, um, fun. There is a difference between a person stating their experience and making an insulting generalisation. And when it comes to inferring a motive or insult the onus is on the reader to be sure they aren't leaping to conclusions.

Selah March
06-02-2010, 08:11 PM
That's interesting, and awesome for that particular writer, but I don't know very many people who can crank out 35 books in five years. I'm a fast writer, but if I manage one full-length book (meaning 75-125k) and one novella (under 75k) a year, I feel like I'm doing very well.

I think if you look at the backlists of the majority of successful* ebook authors, you'll find that most of them release between four and ten books (novellas and full-length) per year.

A high level productivity (while not sacrificing quality) is a skill like any other. It can be learned.

*successful = making a decent living, and no, I don't count myself in that number -- yet -- but only because I'm lazy and fickle and generally a slackerish loser ;)

veinglory
06-02-2010, 08:13 PM
And, realistically, epublishing tends to be a volume market if you want to make a living wage or anything close to it.

Selah March
06-02-2010, 08:30 PM
Personally see a little over-sensitivity here. It is my personal experience that ebooks are often shorter and often do have linear plots, and that sex scenes are easier to write because they are, um, fun. There is a difference between a person stating their experience and making an insulting generalisation. And when it comes to inferring a motive or insult the onus is on the reader to be sure they aren't leaping to conclusions.

Hmm. Yes, ebooks are often shorter, and often do have more linear plots.

Personally, the sex scenes are the hardest for me to write because I struggle so to keep them from sounding not only like every other sex scene I've ever written, but also to keep them from sounding like every other sex scene anybody else has ever written. I suspect I fail more than I succeed. And that struggle -- and constant second-guessing -- takes a lot of the fun out of it for me.

Also, I'm somewhat obsessed in making sure the sex scene earns its place in the story. I feel my earlier work had too much sex that didn't reveal character or move plot -- sex for sex's sake, in other words. I can barely read my earlier stuff for that reason. I wish I were less neurotic about it. I'd like writing sex to be fun again.

Having said that, I guess I have to credit the idea that some folks really can't write fast enough to make a living in ebook publishing. But I still suspect that most writers who've been doing it for a while can produce at least 700 quality words in a day.

And I apologize for helping to yank this thread so far afield. I'll bow out until I have something to say that's specific to Carina Press.

mscelina
06-02-2010, 08:42 PM
I just wanted to throw in a comment here. I met Angela James at the RT convention, and not only was she extremely nice and very helpful in the workshops she participated in on panel, but she was personable and kind and everyone I spoke to about her had extremely positive things to say. There was a great deal of interest at RT in Carina Press (their publisher spotlight was right after ours) and I, for one, think that Carina would be a good direction for some writers to go in if the press meets their specific and personal goals. Angela was highly respected as an editor before she went to Carina, and her sterling reputation gave Carina a lot of credibility right from the get go.

I have a feeling that Angela would be more than willing to address any issues or questions about Carina Press should anyone wish to field them. Just my two cents' worth--take it for what it's worth.

Susan Gable
06-02-2010, 08:54 PM
It makes sense to me that this would carry over to Carina, though with a wider choice when it comes to epubs it may not always be in the author's best interests as it would be with Harlequin. You've got the Harlequin contract without the explicit Harlequin branding - will you get the Harlequin sales figures? I'm still annoyed they haven't put their name to it, tbh, though I am looking forward to reading some of the non-romance books. It would be great to see that side of the market grow a little more.

Would you like some hard sales figures on how some Harlequin books sell in ebook form? Lemme just grab my most recent royalty statement.

Now, mind you, this isn't a book that's primary format is ebook. This is my series (Superromance) book from last year, A Kid to the Rescue. The book was an RT Top Pick, 4.5 stars. I had an ad in RT. It was nominated for Superromance of the Year by RT, and it's also now finaled in the Booksellers' Best Contest, and the National Readers' Choice Award. (That's just to give you some idea about the book.)

Internet English Electronic copies -- 102 copies.

I have no idea if that figure includes Kindle copies. I do know I sold one or two of those at least.

For what it's worth (not much <G>), there's some hard data for you.

Oh, and also hard data -- sales of physical copies are way down. :cry: But we're still ahead of the average ebooks sales, I would guess. This book has sold - copies I've been paid for - is just over 30k. That's including Aus/NZ sales.

Soooooo...that's why authors hand over rights to HQ when it comes to print books. (And yeah, those sales figures are DOWN. Big time.) Only time (and some people willing to share data like this) will tell if it's worth handing over rights to Carina. Like any other newer venture, it has to prove itself.

Susan G.

brainstorm77
06-02-2010, 09:18 PM
Would you like some hard sales figures on how some Harlequin books sell in ebook form? Lemme just grab my most recent royalty statement.

Now, mind you, this isn't a book that's primary format is ebook. This is my series (Superromance) book from last year, A Kid to the Rescue. The book was an RT Top Pick, 4.5 stars. I had an ad in RT. It was nominated for Superromance of the Year by RT, and it's also now finaled in the Booksellers' Best Contest, and the National Readers' Choice Award. (That's just to give you some idea about the book.)

Internet English Electronic copies -- 102 copies.

I have no idea if that figure includes Kindle copies. I do know I sold one or two of those at least.

For what it's worth (not much <G>), there's some hard data for you.

Oh, and also hard data -- sales of physical copies are way down. :cry: But we're still ahead of the average ebooks sales, I would guess. This book has sold - copies I've been paid for - is just over 30k. That's including Aus/NZ sales.

Soooooo...that's why authors hand over rights to HQ when it comes to print books. (And yeah, those sales figures are DOWN. Big time.) Only time (and some people willing to share data like this) will tell if it's worth handing over rights to Carina. Like any other newer venture, it has to prove itself.

Susan G.

It's a great book :)

Susan Gable
06-02-2010, 11:12 PM
It's a great book :)

:Hug2: Thanks. (Your check is in the mail. <G>)

And if you liked it, then that hero's brother book is available on eHarlequin now (in print or ebook) and everywhere else next month. <G>

Susan G.

brainstorm77
06-02-2010, 11:14 PM
:Hug2: Thanks. (Your check is in the mail. <G>)

And if you liked it, then that hero's brother book is available on eHarlequin now (in print or ebook) and everywhere else next month. <G>

Susan G.

Ha! I will look for it. I liked the last one, so I will buy this one.

Saanen
06-03-2010, 12:14 AM
I know very few writers whose work I enjoy, who would get away with fewer than 700 words a day. Good writers who aim to build a readership have sure as hell got to keep their presence current or they'll be forgotten. 700 words a day is, what, a book every four or five months? That's easily doable.

I never meant to imply that writing 35 books in 5 years is impossible. It's certainly feasible, especially if you define book in this case as a novella or novelette--more like a long short story than a full-blown novel.

All I meant to point out is that most writers can't manage that sort of schedule. It's also clear from the post linked to earlier that the author doesn't just write like crazy, she also promotes herself full-time--something not all of us would be able to do even if we wanted to. In other words, no matter how fast you are or how good your writing, there are other elements that go into success.

It's also (again) a matter of genre. I could write 35 SF or fantasy novelettes, and even if they were remarkable little gems, I'd be lucky to unload even a few of them. There simply isn't the kind of emarket for other genres as there is for erotica and romance. I wish there were!

Which brings me back (in a fairly wide loop) to Carina. I'm glad to hear that they're actively interested in publishing non-romance genres. For one thing, I've got a Sony Reader and I like to order from small publishers whenever I can find something worth reading.

scarletpeaches
06-03-2010, 01:12 AM
Good point about the market for other genres. The overwhelming majority of ebooks are erotic romance.

(I've got the Sony ereader Touch. Love that damn thing. Wonder how I ever managed without it. I've read maybe 2 print books since I got it four months ago and around 60 ebooks).

CaoPaux
06-07-2010, 06:22 PM
Official launch today. Updating link for new landing page: http://ebooks.carinapress.com/

jennontheisland
06-07-2010, 06:24 PM
Yeah, I didn't think there'd be a big ol' H on that site.

Erin
06-07-2010, 06:59 PM
I see a couple titles I would read, except they're not in the ebook formats I like. They limit their formats to only ePUB & PDF. I prefer eReader or Mobi, but I guess I can convert to Stanza for my iPhone. Plus, I didn't see anywhere that indicates the size of the book, i.e. novella vs. novel, etc. This is a pet peeve of mine...as I like my adult novels over 80K and rarely read shorter works.

I like the "presale" option so I can see what books are coming in the next couple weeks. Love their covers! All in all, I'll be watching them.

Kweei
06-07-2010, 07:10 PM
Wow, I love their covers.

Do wish we had page counts on these, though.

Saanen
06-07-2010, 09:56 PM
I'm another one who really wants to see page counts.

I'm discouraged that the one entry they have under fantasy is actually paranormal romance. I was hoping to find something new to download and read tomorrow (when I'll actually have tons of down time to read, I hope!). I'm hoping they don't actually think this paranormal romance is a real fantasy; it's pretty obvious that it's a romance with paranormal elements, not the other way round.

Same for the three books listed under SF. Two are erotica and one's romance.

I hope they broaden their selection of genres pretty soon. Then again, it sounds like this may not be a good source for someone looking for SF/F and not romance--I mean, they are an imprint (eprint?) of Harlequin. That should tip me off right there. :)

Larkin
06-07-2010, 11:17 PM
I saw on the Carina blog that they will be adding more to the site--book length, sample chapters etc, Browse-the-Book (sounds interesting) and another format PRC (no idea what that means). And there is no "H" on the website--but I don't really care.

Though, I would really like to see some fantasy (aka epic/high with or without romance is fine). Angela posted somewhere that they are looking for other genres --there just hasn't been as many submissions fitting the requirements.

I shall wait and see. And hope.

Erin
06-07-2010, 11:49 PM
I saw on the Carina blog that they will be adding more to the site--book length, sample chapters etc, Browse-the-Book (sounds interesting) and another format PRC (no idea what that means). And there is no "H" on the website--but I don't really care.

Though, I would really like to see some fantasy (aka epic/high with or without romance is fine). Angela posted somewhere that they are looking for other genres --there just hasn't been as many submissions fitting the requirements.

I shall wait and see. And hope.

Good to hear about the web additions! PRC is the Mobipocket format. There's no "H" but the copyright on the bottom of the page is Harlequin. I just got their newsletter and it comes from an eHarlequin address.

I'd also love to see some epic fantasy. I prefer mine with a bit of romance!

Larkin
06-08-2010, 12:24 AM
Good to know. I'm not up on all the different digital formats. And I still haven't signed up for the newletter. I should join just to see what it looks like.

jennontheisland
06-08-2010, 12:39 AM
There's no "H" but the copyright on the bottom of the page is Harlequin.
This is something a writer scoping out a new publisher might notice, but the average reader perusing those new-fangled things called electronic books is not going to know that they're looking at a Harlequin product.

The branding is missing.

Erin
06-08-2010, 01:52 AM
This is something a writer scoping out a new publisher might notice, but the average reader perusing those new-fangled things called electronic books is not going to know that they're looking at a Harlequin product.

The branding is missing.

I agree, the Harlequin branding is lacking! I just happen to work with intellectual property and I'm always cognizant of the small legal print. :D

Deb Kinnard
06-08-2010, 02:19 AM
Correct me (please!) if I'm wrong, but didn't they leave the "H" branding off Carina and Dellarte on purpose? Last I heard, RWA still doesn't consider a sale to Carina a legit sale because there's no print book.

Stlight
06-08-2010, 04:36 AM
It may not fall lunder the RWA "this one counts", but Carina doesn't fall under the 'this is a vanity as DelArte does.

jennontheisland
06-08-2010, 04:38 AM
The H branding was never on Carina, only on DellArte.

I don't know how RWA views Carina, but since they've separated the lines of Harlequin in order to keep the company in good standing despite its vanity line, they will be able to treat Carina however they see fit without affecting the rest of the company's status.

Kweei
06-08-2010, 07:37 PM
I always assumed (and probably wrongly) that they didn't attach the "H" logo for a few reasons:

1. Not to compete with themselves. This way Harlequin can still have their romances in print and the ebooks they have on their site. (Unless this has changed.)

2. To make a dent in more markets. So they can experiment a little more with the Carina Press imprints than what they are know for. If they succeed, then they have success on two front. If it doesn't go well, they don't have to worry about the "H" being associated with Carina. They can distance themselves.

3. They figure they don't need to use the brand to draw people to Carina whereas there was controversy over using the H for DellArte since that WAS to specifically attract people to the brand.

Just some of my thoughts. I don't claim to be right.

ccbridges
06-08-2010, 07:42 PM
I think (and it's just my own humble opinion) that Harlequin is looking for new readers who might never pick up a Harlequin in a book store (and who might very well be turned off upon seeing "Harlequin" as publisher.) I'm thinking particularly how Carina is offering m/m ebooks, but it's not something that Harlequin would ever do in their normal lines.

Kweei
06-08-2010, 07:45 PM
I think (and it's just my own humble opinion) that Harlequin is looking for new readers who might never pick up a Harlequin in a book store (and who might very well be turned off upon seeing "Harlequin" as publisher.) I'm thinking particularly how Carina is offering m/m ebooks, but it's not something that Harlequin would ever do in their normal lines.

Right, I also meant to add that but I forgot.

I'll be curious to see how it goes. What kinds of trends they find, etc.

Larkin
07-10-2010, 04:49 AM
I'm confused. (and sometimes it doesn't take much to make me that way.)


Taken from Carina Press submission guideline page:


All submissions will receive an auto-response acknowledging receipt of submission. Please allow 12-16 weeks for an editorial response to your submission. If a response has not been received after 10 weeks, please follow-up with the submissions@carinapress.com email address.


.....So a response may take 12-16 weeks, but follow up after 10?


I sent in my submission back in early april and got the auto-response saying there was a 8-10 week wait. Okay, fine. But with Carina going live this month I assume they got waaay behind on their submissions.

My question: should I send another email or just wait? I don't want to come across as a pest.

Dee Carney
07-10-2010, 05:19 AM
The response time is slowly becoming longer...I know someone who subbed in the early days and heard back after 3 weeks. I subbed a few months ago and heard back in 6 weeks. A friend who subbed a few weeks ago was informed it would be 16 weeks.

It looks like the FAQ hasn't been updated in all the right places.

You wouldn't be a pest to send a polite follow-up email, especially since your response letter said 10 weeks. I say go for it.

Larkin
07-10-2010, 06:33 AM
Hi and thanks, that's good to know.


Though, I'm a wimp. I'll probably just sit back and wait.

Also, it's a 104K epic fantasy romance...so they might pick the shorter submissions first. (faster reading. I don't blame them either. Carina's editors must be pretty crazy busy with that schedule.)

Anyways, I'll go do some more writing while I wait.

Writer18
07-15-2010, 12:18 AM
As an ecstatic new Carina author, I couldn't resist commenting on a couple of points. In no particular order:

> I write urban fantasies that average 100,000 up to 111,000 (and I'm a traditionally published nonfiction author)

> Courtesy of years of classical piano (which I hated -- thanks a lot, Mom), I type ferociously fast (108 wpm with 99% accuracy), which translates to six books written in 18 months.

It took some time to settle on a process for writing, editing, and submitting. But I have one now that works well for me (and have broken my family into accepting that I write every day, without fail). Sometimes, this means writing in-between family activities and well into the wee hours. But it allows me to focus on writing and not the HOW of writing, if you see what I mean.

- Elise

Robin Bayne
07-17-2010, 08:14 PM
I'm confused. (and sometimes it doesn't take much to make me that way.)


Taken from Carina Press submission guideline page:


All submissions will receive an auto-response acknowledging receipt of submission. Please allow 12-16 weeks for an editorial response to your submission. If a response has not been received after 10 weeks, please follow-up with the submissions@carinapress.com email address.


.....So a response may take 12-16 weeks, but follow up after 10?


I sent in my submission back in early april and got the auto-response saying there was a 8-10 week wait. Okay, fine. But with Carina going live this month I assume they got waaay behind on their submissions.

My question: should I send another email or just wait? I don't want to come across as a pest.



I think the initial response time was 8-10 weeks, so it looks like they just forgot to change the # in the next sentence. Probably should read follow up after 12 weeks.

Angela James
07-18-2010, 10:37 PM
I just wanted to throw in a comment here. I met Angela James at the RT convention, and not only was she extremely nice and very helpful in the workshops she participated in on panel, but she was personable and kind and everyone I spoke to about her had extremely positive things to say. There was a great deal of interest at RT in Carina Press (their publisher spotlight was right after ours) and I, for one, think that Carina would be a good direction for some writers to go in if the press meets their specific and personal goals. Angela was highly respected as an editor before she went to Carina, and her sterling reputation gave Carina a lot of credibility right from the get go.

I have a feeling that Angela would be more than willing to address any issues or questions about Carina Press should anyone wish to field them. Just my two cents' worth--take it for what it's worth.

Wow. What a lovely compliment. Thank you.

I apologize for not reading this thread and responding to some of the conversation earlier. I didn't realize there had been new posts to the thread. I need to learn to check the thread itself rather than depending on email notification.

First, since it's most recent: yes, the response time has increased. By August I hope to have brought on 3-5 new freelance editors (in addition to the 10 we currently have) and decrease the response time again. Thanks for pointing out I flubbed when I updated the FAQ/submissions page. We're working on updating the FAQ page to include consumer-specific questions and answers, so the entire page will be updated in the next month.

Genre: We did launch with a large number of romance versus non-romance books. Going forward, you'll continue to see a high percentage of romance but we're steadily acquiring a number of non-romance books including science fiction, fantasy, thriller, women's fiction and mystery. We're also going to be doing a lot more focused marketing towards some of these markets of readers and authors in the coming year. One of the things that's wonderful about the editors we have is that they truly read across genres. For every genre, we have at least 2 editors who are actively interested in acquiring it.

Bookstore: It's a work in progress. Some of the things on the list of features to add include wishlists, word count, browse inside the book and potentially prc (mobi) format.

I'm sorry if I missed a question or concern. Please let me know if there's anything else I can answer.

Juliette Dupree
07-21-2010, 12:18 AM
The fact that Carina doesn't have the Harlequin H on the page is much less of a concern, I think, than the fact that Harlequin's own website doesn't list Carina among the long list of imprints that it own. But the worst is that when you Google "romance ebooks" or "romance e-books", Carina doesn't come up in the first few pages of results OR in the advertising sidebar. (I didn't look beyond the first few pages.)

That, to me, says someone's not following up with SEO (search engine optimization), nor are they effectively advertising. How are ebook readers supposed to find Carina, a new ebook publisher, if they don't find it through Harlequin's website, and they're not advertising on Google?

Juliette Dupree
07-21-2010, 05:22 AM
By the way, I'm not saying there's anything wrong with Carina Press. I think it's an exciting opportunity, one that I'm considering. But I think they might be shooting themselves in the foot if they don't do some SEO and some more advertising.

Because it should be every romance e-publisher's goal that when a reader types "romance ebooks" into google (or any other search engine), their company's name comes up at the top of the list. If it doesn't, that may give some authors, particularly those with experience, a bit of reluctance to sub. Especially when the pub is brand new.

Angela James
08-03-2010, 09:29 PM
The fact that Carina doesn't have the Harlequin H on the page is much less of a concern, I think, than the fact that Harlequin's own website doesn't list Carina among the long list of imprints that it own. But the worst is that when you Google "romance ebooks" or "romance e-books", Carina doesn't come up in the first few pages of results OR in the advertising sidebar. (I didn't look beyond the first few pages.)

That, to me, says someone's not following up with SEO (search engine optimization), nor are they effectively advertising. How are ebook readers supposed to find Carina, a new ebook publisher, if they don't find it through Harlequin's website, and they're not advertising on Google?

With the new HQN site design, Carina is now linked through the site.

As for SEO, we do have someone who works on that, but we concentrate on the search terms that our market research has shown to translate into sales since, as someone noted in another thread, it's about the bottom line. Sure it would be nice to show up in all terms, but barring that, we'll take the ones that make money ;)

brainstorm77
08-03-2010, 11:09 PM
Angela is Carina seeking horror?

Angela James
08-03-2010, 11:16 PM
Angela is Carina seeking horror?

We are, though we haven't acquired any yet. The closest we came was a revise/resubmit that didn't end up working out for us. We don't get a lot of horror submissions, actually. It seems to be more of a niche genre than many niche genres!

michael_b
08-03-2010, 11:53 PM
Actually there are a lot of long established small print based presses that handle horror novels, and most horror authors send to them--or NYC based big pubs--rather than ebook publishers that don't have any market pull with horror readers.

Angela James
08-03-2010, 11:55 PM
I am duly corrected and chastised :P

michael_b
08-04-2010, 12:03 AM
I am duly corrected and chastised :P

I was just letting you know why you don't see a lot of horror submissions. I used to write horror for the small press but discovered I make more money writing various types of erotic romances for ebook publishers.

Chumplet
08-28-2010, 04:52 AM
I inquired about previously published novels - my first book has been returned to me - & Angela said to go ahead and submit it like their regular submissions. However, I used the email address under the 'previously pubbed' section and was sent to another email. The guidelines state that submissions sent to the regular address will receive a confirmation email, but I never received one using the other address.

I wonder if I should re-submit to the regular address or just hold tight?

Angela James
08-28-2010, 04:56 AM
Resubmit to the regular submissions address. I need to change that on the website, it's an error because it was originally a different set up, but we changed it. I'll make a note on my to-do list since technically vacation started today (ha!). And this is the type of question you can always email submissions and ask, that's what the email is there for and I don't mind answering questions via email.

Chumplet
08-28-2010, 05:18 AM
Oh, thank you, Angela! I didn't want to pester a busy editor, but now that you're on vacation... bwahahaha! (just kidding).

I'll resend to the normal address. :)

CScottMorris
09-25-2010, 03:33 AM
So, where are you on the submission response time? Still over 12 weeks?

Angela James
09-25-2010, 05:16 PM
So, where are you on the submission response time? Still over 12 weeks?

Yes, between 12 and 16 weeks right now. We had 3 new freelance editors start this week, so I'm hoping that will have some effect on response time, though it still depends on me to send any rejections. But even if your wait is long, that doesn't = a rejection, because our acquisitions process takes time as well.

Also, someone reminded me that earlier in this thread I'd said payment was 2x/year, which is what we initially thought it would be, but we've adapted our royalty system to pay quarterly.

DeadlyAccurate
09-30-2010, 01:22 AM
Yes, between 12 and 16 weeks right now. We had 3 new freelance editors start this week, so I'm hoping that will have some effect on response time, though it still depends on me to send any rejections.

It must be having some effect, because I got my response today, about 2 weeks ahead of the listed response time. :)

Angela James
09-30-2010, 01:26 AM
It must be having some effect, because I got my response today, about 2 weeks ahead of the listed response time. :)

Well, I'd like to say yes, but being truthful, it just means that I'm working to get caught up on sending out responses, since some are reaching that mark. But the new freelance editors are getting reports back to me already!

brainstorm77
10-18-2010, 09:18 PM
Angela- In another thread you stated that Carina accepts horror subs. Are you seeking anything specific in particular?

jennontheisland
10-18-2010, 09:29 PM
Horror seems to not be much of an emarket. As Michael noted above, it's mostly print and NY. What do you plan to do to draw horror readers to Carina? Or are you intending to cross genres and market them to Carina's typical romance reader?

Erin
10-19-2010, 06:31 AM
Carinia Press is putting select romantic suspense and mystery titles in print thru their Harlequin Direct to Customer program in 2011. Nice move!

See Carina Press blog for more info: http://bit.ly/dBRkY3 (http://bit.ly/dBRkY3)

Angela James
10-19-2010, 04:24 PM
Angela- In another thread you stated that Carina accepts horror subs. Are you seeking anything specific in particular?

Nothing particular at this time. We have several editors who are keen to acquire a good horror manuscript. We've had a couple of manuscripts come close and offered revision suggestions, but haven't found one that's hit yet. One of the members here has received revision suggestions from us, in fact.

Angela James
10-19-2010, 04:28 PM
Horror seems to not be much of an emarket. As Michael noted above, it's mostly print and NY. What do you plan to do to draw horror readers to Carina? Or are you intending to cross genres and market them to Carina's typical romance reader?

Until the past two or three years, we could argue that anything non-erotic didn't seem to have much of an emarket. What we know about publishing and digital publishing specifically, and what sells well and where is changing daily. To declare any absolute about anything at this point (beyond saying: things are changing and will continue to change) is akin to announcing I have a crystal ball and can see into the future (sadly, I do not).

To your other question, as much as romance readers do cross genres, we can't rely on that for other non-romance genres, including horror, so we develop market plans to target readers outside romance.

Angela James
10-19-2010, 04:30 PM
Carinia Press is putting select romantic suspense and mystery titles in print thru their Harlequin Direct to Customer program in 2011. Nice move!

See Carina Press blog for more info: http://bit.ly/dBRkY3 (http://bit.ly/dBRkY3)

Thank you, we're very excited about this and future possibilites.

brainstorm77
10-19-2010, 04:35 PM
Nothing particular at this time. We have several editors who are keen to acquire a good horror manuscript. We've had a couple of manuscripts come close and offered revision suggestions, but haven't found one that's hit yet. One of the members here has received revision suggestions from us, in fact.

Thanks for the reply.

jennontheisland
10-22-2010, 07:25 AM
Until the past two or three years, we could argue that anything non-erotic didn't seem to have much of an emarket. What we know about publishing and digital publishing specifically, and what sells well and where is changing daily. To declare any absolute about anything at this point (beyond saying: things are changing and will continue to change) is akin to announcing I have a crystal ball and can see into the future (sadly, I do not).

To your other question, as much as romance readers do cross genres, we can't rely on that for other non-romance genres, including horror, so we develop market plans to target readers outside romance.
Thanks Angela.

A market plan for Harlequin Horror would be an interesting thing. ;) I know that H is not something I look for when I'm scoping out scary stuff.

Your horror editor... what horror markets has he/she worked in?

Ann_Mayburn
11-04-2010, 09:15 PM
I recently emailed Carina about what their definition of erotic romance is as opposed to plain erotica. Below is the response I received from Angela James, Executive Editor at Carnina Press Hopefully, this will help future authors submitting to their publishing house.



To be erotic romance, it has to have a happily ever after/happily for now and the romance needs to be a central theme, along with the eroticism. Erotica requires no elements of romance. Hope this helps!

Angela James
Executive Editor, Carina Press

Juliette Dupree
11-16-2010, 10:49 PM
Now that Carina Press has been up and running for a while, I'd like to find out how their sales are doing. I'm interested in submitting an erotic romance to them, but I'm wondering if they've built up enough of an audience yet that it would be worth going to them, rather than Ellora's Cave, which is more established in the e-pub business, especially with Carina's lower royalty rate.

Does anyone out there have any information as to sales stats on Carina Press? Or has anyone heard from any authors as to how well their books are doing there?

The closest I've come is some stats on novelrank.com for some of the Carina books, and they weren't that impressive. But that only lists Amazon sales. I'd love to know how well sales are doing on Carina's own site.

I'd also like to know if anyone knows how to figure out book lengths on Carina. I didn't notice anything for the books I browsed that lets the reader know how long the book is. That's important when trying to figure out what your royalties would be per book. Have I overlooked that, or have they left that out? Because with ebooks, I personally find it important to know the length. I'd be ticked if I paid five bucks for a book, and THEN found out it was teeny tiny.

Thanks!

BarbaraSheridan
11-16-2010, 11:20 PM
I don't have any answer for you but I'm dying to know the same thing. C'mon, someone spill ;)

brainstorm77
11-16-2010, 11:24 PM
YOu should ask a mod to port this over to the Carina thread in Bewares. The editor of Carina is often in that thread to answer questions directly.

Ambri
11-17-2010, 01:55 AM
You might also ask on the Romance Divas forum; I believe there are some lovely ladies there who are published through Carina.

jennontheisland
11-17-2010, 03:55 AM
I think the Carina thread in BR&BC said they pay every 6 months... Have they passed that marker?

Soccer Mom
11-17-2010, 04:09 AM
I'll port this over to the Carina thread in B&BC. Angela James, the EIC for Carina frequently pops in there and answers questions. If you check that thread, I'll bet she's left some contact info for folks with submission questions.

Paz
11-17-2010, 05:14 AM
I think the Carina thread in BR&BC said they pay every 6 months... Have they passed that marker?

Angela wrote somewhere on this thread (i think pg 8)


Also, someone reminded me that earlier in this thread I'd said payment was 2x/year, which is what we initially thought it would be, but we've adapted our royalty system to pay quarterly.

So some people should've recieved some numbers regarding their stories. I'm also interested in hearing numbers (or any type of feedback Angela or authors are willing to give, really), esp for non romance focused titles....

Dee Carney
11-18-2010, 03:46 AM
RE: pay frequency



Also, someone reminded me that earlier in this thread I'd said payment was 2x/year, which is what we initially thought it would be, but we've adapted our royalty system to pay quarterly.

Angela James
11-20-2010, 07:07 PM
The first significant reporting date will be at the end of December.

EnnaEnoch
12-09-2010, 12:32 AM
Carina hasn't paid any of their authors, or so I've been told from a source. Also their contract is one I would never sign.

How can an epublisher with such connections not pay after a year since opening their doors?

Sounds strange to me.

veinglory
12-09-2010, 12:37 AM
They have had books on sale since... June? So, less than a year and more than a quarter.

Angela James
12-09-2010, 12:40 AM
Carina hasn't paid any of their authors, or so I've been told from a source. Also their contract is one I would never sign.

How can an epublisher with such connections not pay after a year since opening their doors?

Sounds strange to me.

We've been publishing books for six months. Our contract runs on quarterly payments, and our first statement had 3 weeks on it. Because of how 3rd party retailers pay/report, no numbers had been reported for those three weeks with the exception of 2 small accounts, which didn't equal enough for payments to be generated. The first payments will go out with the second quarter reports at the beginning of January.

jennontheisland
12-09-2010, 04:10 AM
We've been publishing books for six months. Our contract runs on quarterly payments, and our first statement had 3 weeks on it. Because of how 3rd party retailers pay/report, no numbers had been reported for those three weeks with the exception of 2 small accounts, which didn't equal enough for payments to be generated. The first payments will go out with the second quarter reports at the beginning of January.
Regarding the bolded portion:

What is the minimum payout?

ShannonStacey
12-09-2010, 07:07 PM
Regarding the bolded portion:

What is the minimum payout?

Our publisher and editors hold the specific terms of our contracts with them confidential, but I can say the minimum payout is fairly low ($25). However, the launch was so close to the end of Q2 that there were no 3rd party retailer reports available except, as Angela said, two small accounts.

The bottom line is that authors aren't going to have the data people are looking for until the first week in January when they receive Q3 statements.

Angela James
12-09-2010, 07:22 PM
Yes, that's correct, thank you, Shannon.

Chumplet
12-10-2010, 01:36 AM
Form R received yesterday on my August 27th submission package of my first novel (of which rights had been returned to me from TWRP).

A.P.M.
01-13-2011, 02:45 AM
Submitted a science fiction romance three days ago. No electronic response telling me it was received, though, which is in their guidelines.

Adobedragon
01-13-2011, 03:08 AM
Submitted a science fiction romance three days ago. No electronic response telling me it was received, though, which is in their guidelines.

I submitted last week and noticed the same thing. When I submitted to Carina back in late summer 2010, I immediately got an auto-response. I wonder if I should follow up in a few days? I hate having something listed in my submission spreadsheet, when the submission is instead lost in e-space.

Angela James
01-13-2011, 03:21 AM
We had a problem with an autoresponse loop in the last few weeks that resulted in around 25,000 emails in the inbox. Not the first time it's happened, sadly. Apparently, when IT was fixing it this time, they turned off the autoresponse and forgot to turn it back on. I figured it out on Monday and had it reinstated. In the meantime, I've responded to everyone who followed up when they didn't receive the autoresponse.

Adobedragon
01-13-2011, 03:48 AM
We had a problem with an autoresponse loop in the last few weeks that resulted in around 25,000 emails in the inbox. Not the first time it's happened, sadly. Apparently, when IT was fixing it this time, they turned off the autoresponse and forgot to turn it back on. I figured it out on Monday and had it reinstated. In the meantime, I've responded to everyone who followed up when they didn't receive the autoresponse.

Ah, so I'll take that to mean it's okay to follow up and make sure my sub made it. I didn't want to be a nervous-nelly pest and annoy your editors. Thanks!

EnnaEnoch
01-17-2011, 11:26 PM
Any news if Carina has paid their authors yet?

ShannonStacey
01-17-2011, 11:39 PM
Yes. We received our statements between 12/30 and the first week or so of January.

Angela James
01-17-2011, 11:59 PM
@ShannonStacey You ruined my fun. I was going to say that we'd decided not to pay people.

brainstorm77
01-18-2011, 12:02 AM
*Pssst* Angela is it true you really pay with chickens and magic beans? :D

ShannonStacey
01-18-2011, 12:02 AM
Oh, that would have been fun. Next quarter...

Angela James
01-18-2011, 12:10 AM
*Pssst* Angela is it true you really pay with chickens and magic beans? :D

That made me snort my tea. I'm going to have to borrow that line.

But Shannon is correct. Statements and checks (where due) were mailed earlier in the month.

brainstorm77
01-18-2011, 12:17 AM
That made me snort my tea. I'm going to have to borrow that line.

But Shannon is correct. Statements and checks (where due) were mailed earlier in the month.
:ROFL:

scarletpeaches
01-18-2011, 02:34 AM
I would only submit to Carina if they agreed to pay me in chocolate money.

agentpaper
01-18-2011, 03:16 AM
I would only submit to Carina if they agreed to pay me in chocolate money.


:ROFL:

ellisnation
01-18-2011, 06:15 AM
I think I submitted to Carina Press while they were having auto-response issues. Didn't get one. BUT...when I emailed a week later to withdraw my submission after getting a contract elsewhere, I did get a response back (with Angela James's signature) that said "Thanks for letting us know and congratulations." So it does look like they try to respond to submissions/emails in a timely manner.

I'm intrigued by this press so I'm hoping we get more feedback from their current authors soon concerning $$$.

Angela James
01-18-2011, 06:30 AM
I think I submitted to Carina Press while they were having auto-response issues. Didn't get one. BUT...when I emailed a week later to withdraw my submission after getting a contract elsewhere, I did get a response back (with Angela James's signature) that said "Thanks for letting us know and congratulations." So it does look like they try to respond to submissions/emails in a timely manner.

I'm intrigued by this press so I'm hoping we get more feedback from their current authors soon concerning $$$.

Signature is mine because it's me! There's an autoresponse for all emails, with the exception of a period of time I wasn't aware it had been turned off. I try to respond to all queries and other things personally within a reasonable time frame, but sometimes that reasonable time frame is fluid depending on when it comes in. For instance, over the holidays I was traveling for work before the holidays and then took vacation during, so replies were delayed. Alternately, I'm in Toronto this week and traveling for four consecutive weeks for work in the next month, so that will slow down responses.

Angela James
01-18-2011, 06:30 AM
I would only submit to Carina if they agreed to pay me in chocolate money.

I have M&Ms.

Tifferbugz
01-18-2011, 06:41 AM
I have M&Ms.

Sold! ;)

tarak
01-18-2011, 06:55 AM
I would only submit to Carina if they agreed to pay me in chocolate money.
My husband is an attorney in private practice. One of his clients pays him in cheesecake (right hand to God). Even cheesecake gets old after a while.

For some reason, I had it in my head that Carina only wanted romance. After looking at the submission page, I'm happy to see they don't, so I have another epub to add to my list.

Angela James
01-18-2011, 07:00 AM
My husband is an attorney in private practice. One of his clients pays him in cheesecake (right hand to God). Even cheesecake gets old after a while.

For some reason, I had it in my head that Carina only wanted romance. After looking at the submission page, I'm happy to see they don't, so I have another epub to add to my list.

Indeed, we've even published non-romance!

Mr Flibble
01-18-2011, 04:34 PM
Technically my latest isn't really romance (though it does have a fair bit of romantic elements).

Anyway, it's categorised under fantasy action/adventure. And pirates, naturally.

ETA: I would like to add the whole Carina team are excellent at helping the author with promo/how tos on various things like self editing/social media etc. I've learnt a bundle.

ShannonStacey
01-18-2011, 07:25 PM
Yesterday they released a military sci-fi called 47 ECHO that looks really good. I rarely read outside the romance genre, but I read (and loved) Scalzi's OMW series, so I'm going to give it a shot.

ShannonStacey
01-18-2011, 07:33 PM
I'm intrigued by this press so I'm hoping we get more feedback from their current authors soon concerning $$$.

I was very happy with the numbers for my launch release (a non-erotic contemporary romance). In keeping half an eye on the Amazon rankings and such for my November & December releases (both also non-erotic contemp, one a novella) I suspect I'll be very happy with their numbers, as well.

ellisnation
01-18-2011, 07:37 PM
I was very happy with the numbers for my launch release (a non-erotic contemporary romance). In keeping half an eye on the Amazon rankings and such for my November & December releases (both also non-erotic contemp, one a novella) I suspect I'll be very happy with their numbers, as well.


I'm not surprised. Carina's website has looked top notch from day one. Their covers, too.

:)

veinglory
01-18-2011, 07:41 PM
If anyone should want to report sales data they could do it here: http://erecsite.blogspot.com/2010/01/how-to-report-erec-data.html

ShannonStacey
01-18-2011, 07:48 PM
I'm not surprised. Carina's website has looked top notch from day one. Their covers, too.

:)

The behind-the-scenes team is top notch, too. I've been all-around very happy with Carina.

ShannonStacey
01-18-2011, 07:48 PM
If anyone should want to report sales data they could do it here: http://erecsite.blogspot.com/2010/01/how-to-report-erec-data.html

Isn't that for erotic, though? I thought it was.

veinglory
01-18-2011, 07:52 PM
It is expanding, hence the question 'is this erotic romance' Y/N. Other genres will be reported separately.

Fae Sutherland
01-18-2011, 07:58 PM
I would only submit to Carina if they agreed to pay me in chocolate money.

LOL, from the few bits of numbers I've seen floating around in the internet ether, it would be a LOT of chocolate. :)

ShannonStacey
01-18-2011, 08:01 PM
It is expanding, hence the question 'is this erotic romance' Y/N. Other genres will be reported separately.

Thanks. I haven't been there in a while because I moved away from erotic romance several years ago. I'll probably check it out.

veinglory
01-18-2011, 08:03 PM
So far it is only erotic romance data posted, probably because those are the readers of the blog and what it says in the header. But as soon as I have more I will make it available. :)

scarletpeaches
01-19-2011, 02:41 AM
I have M&Ms.Deal!

How are you fixed for filthy, dirty erotica? 'Cause that's my speciality.

I'll throw in a threesome if you give me a good percentage on royalties and a mars bar.

ShannonStacey
01-19-2011, 02:44 AM
Fight her on edits, though, and you get stale marshmallow peeps from last Easter. Still trying to get the yellow sparkly sugar out of my keyboard.

Unimportant
01-19-2011, 02:45 AM
What do I have to write to get Belgian chocolates from Angela?

scarletpeaches
01-19-2011, 02:47 AM
This is a publisher I would happily write for.

Chocolate and bribery FTW! :D

Jersey Chick
01-19-2011, 04:45 AM
Payment in chocolate is okay. Peeps, stale or otherwise, are heinous.