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GeorgeK
11-05-2009, 04:13 AM
If you have a night vision scope on a rifle, would you have to remove it for use during daylight? I assume they use batteries? I also assume that dropping the weapon might break the scope or at least knock it out of alignment? (Characters are modern US with access to a military armory)

StephanieFox
11-05-2009, 04:15 AM
Too much light! They concentrate light and it would hurt (!) your eye if you looked through them. Put a regular scope on instead.

Duncan J Macdonald
11-05-2009, 06:09 AM
If you have a night vision scope on a rifle, would you have to remove it for use during daylight? I assume they use batteries? I also assume that dropping the weapon might break the scope or at least knock it out of alignment? (Characters are modern US with access to a military armory)
To answer your questions. Yes. Yes. Yes and Yes.

Histry Nerd
11-05-2009, 08:35 AM
Hey, GeorgeK -

If it's a light-intensifier type scope (most are), you could only use it during the day with a very dark filter. Some of the older scopes had pinhole lens covers for use during daylight, but as I recall the image resolution wasn't great and the field of view was much narrower than you could get at night.

A thermal or IR sight (two different things) should work equally well day or night, but those are not common on rifles; thermal sights are large and heavy because they require cooling systems to work, and the IR devices I've seen have had a pretty short range. You could mount a thermal sight on a tripod-mounted machine gun if it's going to be in one place for a while, but I wouldn't want to hump one around with my rifle.

Thermal sights are usually hooked up to a vehicle or other power source, but some can run on batteries. The others all use batteries.

If you are in the U.S. Army and you drop your weapon, you'll need to drop with it and do push-ups. If you drop it with optics mounted, you'll want to re-zero at your next opportunity. If you drop it with a night scope on it, you might be writing Uncle Sam a fat check to buy a new night scope--it costs more than the rifle.

Dropping your weapon is not good. Don't do it.

Hope it helps.
HN

GeorgeK
11-12-2009, 02:08 AM
[/QUOTE]



If it's a light-intensifier type scope (most are), you could only use it during the day with a very dark filter.


So then the ambient light during daytime does not interfere with the visual acuity of looking through the filter? I would have assumed they did significantly interfere but have never used one.


Some of the older scopes had pinhole lens covers for use during daylight, but as I recall the image resolution wasn't great and the field of view was much narrower than you could get at night.





A thermal or IR sight (two different things) should work equally well day or night, but those are not common on rifles; thermal sights are large and heavy because they require cooling systems to work,


Ok, then thermal would be out because this needs to be mobile easily as the captain chases the aliens through the woods


and the IR devices I've seen have had a pretty short range.


How short? Terrain is rolling hills that are wooded so 100 yards is realistically the max that they'd see anything anyways.


You could mount a thermal sight on a tripod-mounted machine gun if it's going to be in one place for a while, but I wouldn't want to hump one around with my rifle.

Thermal sights are usually hooked up to a vehicle or other power source, but some can run on batteries. The others all use batteries.


Now you have me wondering, what size of batteries? I was thinking some dinky little things like in a cell phone or hearing aid. Now I'm wondering if the add ons are amounting to a microwave oven duct taped to a rifle.




If you are in the U.S. Army and you drop your weapon, you'll need to drop with it and do push-ups. If you drop it with optics mounted, you'll want to re-zero at your next opportunity. If you drop it with a night scope on it, you might be writing Uncle Sam a fat check to buy a new night scope--it costs more than the rifle.


Cool! I had assumed it would simply negatively affect their next possible promotion, not that they'd actually have to pay for it. What is it like, 10 grand?

hammerklavier
11-13-2009, 02:55 AM
This is a good one, at least for the civilian market,

http://www.opticsplanet.net/eotech-4-5x-night-vision-weapon-sight-with-auto-brightness-m957.html

Shattuck
11-13-2009, 07:15 AM
Here is a night vision scope:
http://www.visualintel.net/Army/People/Army-Sniper/7672930_6RNwo/2/495417276_kxytT

Here is an Infrared Scope:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/14/M1_z_celownikiem_noktowizyjnym.jpg

Here is a smaller Thermal Scope:
http://www.turkiyegazetesi.com.tr/images/news/396728_2.gif

These are just rough guidelines, the optics for each come in smaller or larger sizes but that should give you a basic idea of what you are working with. A thermal scope may be something to look into; however, they are extremely expensive and would be very hard to get a hold of for a civilian. Here is an example of a very small (comparatively) thermal scope:
http://www.imaging1.com/images/1_digital_thermal%20scope%20DHS%20over%20NY.gif

GeorgeK
11-16-2009, 08:38 PM
Wow, I didn't realize how big these things are. But if I might venture what is likely a stupid question...What is the difference between a "thermal" and an "infra-red" scope?