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PoppysInARow
11-04-2009, 08:15 AM
I need to translate "You are far from home, little wolf." This is the polite, an older person speaking to a younger one. They don't know each other very well, and the speaker is very old fashioned.

Thank you very much! :)

Melisande
11-04-2009, 04:43 PM
Du bist weit weg von Dein zu Hause, klein Wolfchen.

or

Klein Wolfchen, Du bist weit weg von Dein Heimat.

I am not 100% sure about the grammar, though.

Stijn Hommes
11-05-2009, 02:55 PM
The word Dein shouldn't be capitalized; it's not a noun or at the start of the sentence.
Also, I think they could just as easily say "Du bist weit weg von Haus, Wölfchen." (Note the points over the "o".) It's not a literal translation, but it means the same thing, and it's common enough.
Using the phrase Wölfchen means you're already talking about a small wolf. (another German peculiarity) So the word "Klein" as well would be overkill.

JustLooking
11-05-2009, 07:03 PM
Funny, this. I’m trying only to lurk but I can’t resist these German threads!

A few questions:

You say it’s an older person talking to a younger one, so is it a human who’s being addressed, or actually a wolf? If human, do they have the nickname “Little Wolf”?

Is the sentence a simple statement, intended merely to point out that the little wolf is a long way from home? Or is some extra nuance of meaning required, e.g. “Goodness me, you really have strayed a long way,” or maybe even: “This isn’t your home here [so you can’t behave how you like]”?

Which kind of “home” are we talking about: the house/town where the little wolf lives, or its homeland/native country?

Is the older person likely to be addressing the younger one with affection?

PoppysInARow
11-05-2009, 07:50 PM
Funny, this. I’m trying only to lurk but I can’t resist these German threads!

A few questions:

You say it’s an older person talking to a younger one, so is it a human who’s being addressed, or actually a wolf? If human, do they have the nickname “Little Wolf”?

Is the sentence a simple statement, intended merely to point out that the little wolf is a long way from home? Or is some extra nuance of meaning required, e.g. “Goodness me, you really have strayed a long way,” or maybe even: “This isn’t your home here [so you can’t behave how you like]”?

Which kind of “home” are we talking about: the house/town where the little wolf lives, or its homeland/native country?

Is the older person likely to be addressing the younger one with affection?

It's actually a werewolf being adressed, so it's technically litteral. The werewolf is from Germany, which is why the speaker is using German. He is in Canada though, so it's kind of interested, "Well, aren't you a ways from home, hm?" kind of tone. It's kind of a question, the speaker is trying to intice the werewolf into a conversation, perhaps to explain what he's doing so far from Germany, but it's mostly just curiosity.

JustLooking
11-05-2009, 10:34 PM
Then my suggestion is:

Du bist aber weit weg von zu Hause, kleiner Wolf.

I wouldn’t go for Wölfchen because to me that sounds a bit too much like a term of endearment, so not appropriate in the circumstances.

jennifer75
11-05-2009, 10:36 PM
Sie sind weit weg von Zuhause, kleiner Wolf.

....is what Google Translate says. ;)

JustLooking
11-05-2009, 10:46 PM
Hmm, you could use "Sie" I suppose. Depends how old the wolf is. For people, an older person speaking to a younger one would use "du" up until about age 16 or so. The "little wolf" bit makes it "du" for me, tho!

Menyanthana
11-08-2009, 07:17 PM
"Du bist weit weg von zuhause/zu Hause, kleiner Wolf"
(not sure about the "zu Hause", I'd go for "zuhause" but the spelling reform confuses me.)

You can put an "aber" in, as JustLooking suggested, which would make it more like a question and also more natural sounding.
Without "aber" it would sound more like an observation and more formal.

What kind of person is speaker? Is she or he German?

"Sie" doesn't work with "klein". If the person is almost an adult, then you'd not say "klein".

StephanieFox
11-08-2009, 11:21 PM
It's actually a werewolf being adressed, so it's technically litteral. The werewolf is from Germany, which is why the speaker is using German. He is in Canada though, so it's kind of interested, "Well, aren't you a ways from home, hm?" kind of tone. It's kind of a question, the speaker is trying to intice the werewolf into a conversation, perhaps to explain what he's doing so far from Germany, but it's mostly just curiosity.

I thought they'd banned European werewolves so they wouldn't interbreed with the native Canadian werewolf population. Has the law changed?

Synonym
11-08-2009, 11:28 PM
It's all about the size of the gene-pool. ;)

JustLooking
11-09-2009, 01:08 AM
... (not sure about the "zu Hause", I'd go for "zuhause" but the spelling reform confuses me.)

...


Yes, I have to admit that had me scrambling for my Duden! It would appear, from what I could make out, that both are correct, with "zu Hause" preferred in Germany but "zuhause" preferred in Austria and Switzerland.

WrathOfMe
11-14-2009, 01:37 AM
Hmm... I think the above "Du bist aber weit weg von zu Hause, kleiner Wolf" is the best, given the circumstances.

Are you married to that particular phrase? Maybe it's just me (I'm not a native speaker) but it sounds a bit awkward to me in German.

Cinzia8
11-17-2009, 03:19 AM
Hi,

I don't speak German, but I asked my good friend who is a native speaker and teaches German. Here is her response. I have to deal with Latin issues so I like these threads.

Let me figure out if I got this right: Two characters speaking, one older than the other, and the one spoken to is a Werewolf?
Ok, so here is how I'd say it:
"Du bist weit von zuhaus, kleiner Wolf." in literature speak I'd say (write): "Du bist der Heimat fern, kleiner Wolf." Since it's an older addressing a young one, the older one would use the familiar form of "du", even if they don't know each other. Unless they are two grown up adults, or really old. Then the older one might say "Sie sind der Heimat fern." but then "kleiner Wolf" doesn't make any sense because that is definitely familiar talk.