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Rhys Cordelle
10-25-2009, 02:28 AM
I've never owned a notebook, always just had a desktop, but I feel like this is something I want to own now that I'm writing.

I was wanting to get peoples opinions on which brands of notebooks have served them well or poorly. What software is useful/important for a writer. Are Macbooks the way to go? Just anything on this subject that could help me make a decision. Thanks :)

Synonym
10-25-2009, 02:56 AM
Darn, I was in hopes that you'd found it. I'm looking too, I'm interested to see what everyone has to say.

scarletpeaches
10-25-2009, 03:00 AM
I assume notebook is Americanese for laptop?

I have an acer something-or-other. 160HD, 1gb RAM (sheesh...with Vista? Crap). I use MS Office 2007.

Also an acer aspire netbook, thankfully with the XP OS, 2gb RAM and a similar-sized HD.

Synonym
10-25-2009, 03:15 AM
More like the netbook I think, Scarlet. Little bitty laptops. Light, easy to transport. I think they'd be handy as heck when you're traveling. It drives me nuts to go somewhere and not be able to get a little writing done when the alternative is being bored to death, waiting for time to pass.

scarletpeaches
10-25-2009, 03:17 AM
That's why I love my acer aspire. And the battery power on those things is amazing.

Trouble is, WiFi = timesucker.

Synonym
10-25-2009, 03:20 AM
Yeah, staying out of here would probably get my story finished. :)

JoNightshade
10-25-2009, 03:41 AM
Yeah, clarify... we talking about a laptop or netbook? Also, are you looking to replace your desktop or add to the collection? :)

For the past year or two I've been using a Fujitsu Lifebook as my only computer. I like it quite a lot. It's on the small, compact side of laptops, which is great for traveling (from city to city or just from one room to another in the house). It also has a screen that you can flip around and close over the keyboard so that the screen is face-up, and you can use it with a stylus either portrait or landscape style. I use this for brainstorming or surfing the internet when my hands get sore from too much use.

jclarkdawe
10-25-2009, 05:21 AM
I use a MacBook as my sole computer. Years ago I had a laptop and a desk computer, but the desktop became less and less important. Macs are pricey but fairly rugged. I usually get four or five years out of a Mac without repairs, and by the time it needs repairs, you can't get parts for the damn thing.

I went into Macs before Microsoft came up with anything more than DOS, and although I don't see a lot of difference between the systems these days, I still find trouble a bit easier to solve on the Mac. Networking is a lot easier and WiFi is a delight. I believe that free WiFi is a constitutional right, and frequently can find someone I can log on through. Despite extensive traveling on occasion, I've never felt the need for a paid service. (Panera Bread is a wonderful business, by the way. Food's good and the WiFi easy.)

Mac came up with a new design for the electric plug which is magnetic. It has been incredibly rugged, and is one of the weakest points on a lot of laptops.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

kaitie
10-25-2009, 07:17 AM
I use Dell's which I have always found reliable, cheap, and they have good customer service. I also got a fun little dock with my new laptop. :) My last two computers before this one were Dell's, and my family uses them as well, and we've never really had any issues. My previous computer last about four years, and technically it still works and I can still use it. I wanted a new one because a) it was starting to make an odd noise and I was thinking it probably wouldn't make it through another year, and b) because I wanted something with more ram and a better processor.

The new one I have is pretty maxed out (better than my friend's desktop, and his is only a year old), and I was able to customize it for my personal needs. I also love the service there. I was able to arrange for a computer that I had found on the Japanese site (didn't want the Japanese operating system), and even more awesome they helped me apply a discount that helped me cut off about three hundred dollars from the price and actually managed to get me a better deal on memory than I would have had before.

The only thing I would warn about is their payment plan...well, any payment plan when it comes to computers. It's very easy to end up paying double the cost in interest, and I've known people who have. I always pay for mine upfront so it isn't a problem.

KTC
10-25-2009, 07:20 AM
I assume notebook is Americanese for laptop?

I have an acer something-or-other. 160HD, 1gb RAM (sheesh...with Vista? Crap). I use MS Office 2007.

Also an acer aspire netbook, thankfully with the XP OS, 2gb RAM and a similar-sized HD.

i say laptop too. i thought notebook was a brand name, but i don't know.

the one i'm on at present is a toshiba. i love it...but i love my older one more. i'm sticking with these two, because i hate hate hate the new screens that look like glass....they're shiny. mine aren't shiny and that's the way i like it. i'm afraid all the new ones may be the kind i don't like.

Judg
10-25-2009, 07:42 AM
Yeah, that's the really irritating thing with my Compaq laptop. Shiny screen, so it's impossible to work with outside and difficult in a bright room.

You can buy a plastic film to put over it that will cut the glare, but I haven't bothered yet.

maestrowork
10-25-2009, 11:52 AM
I love my MacBook, so you have my endorsement. I've had the MBP (the earliest 1.8GHz version) for four years now and it still works great. I've NEVER had a PC laptop that lasted this long (the way I use/abuse my computers). The MacBook is pretty much out of the box experience with almost everything you need. But do get iWork if it's not already bundled. It's much smaller and easier to use than MS Office for the Mac (iWork works fine with MS documents such as Word or Excel); also a PDF writer is built into the OS.

Also, the Mac can run Windows, so you don't have to give up your old Windows programs.

Although with Windows 7 out, I'm kind of interested in getting a cheap netbook (about $300) for travel and writing, because of size and weight. They're still a bit too small to do everything I need to do, but for travel, etc. it's a good alternative -- and then I just plug everything back to the MBP.

Terie
10-25-2009, 12:12 PM
If the only thing you want a notebook for is writing, you might consider an AlphaSmart (http://www.neo-direct.com/default.aspx) instead. It's essentially a Palm-powered word processing device with a full-sized keyboard (sans number pad). And VERY durable -- they're also made for kids to use at school.

AlphaSmarts don't have all the software and 'net access that make great distractions....just word processing software and a few other tools (like calendar, memos, calculator). You can shoot your MS back and forth between your AlphaSmart and your computer (desktop, laptop, or notebook). The screen is perfectly easy to read indoors or out. The Dana model (which is what I have) has a larger screen and a battery life of about 25 hours, while the Neo model has a smaller screen and a battery life of something like 700 hours (not a typo--seven hundred hours).

If you do need apps beyond word processing, a notebook is a better choice. But check it out. I loves me AlphaSmart!

Rhys Cordelle
10-25-2009, 03:50 PM
Thanks for the advice, I will look into the alpha smart but I'm probably looking for something that functions more like a desktop pc (though it doesn't need to run high quality games or anything). I'd also prefer something reasonably sizable so not keen on netbooks at the moment.

Notebooks and laptops are the same thing. I live in new zealand, and we tend to use both english and american terminology. Can be a bit confusing :)

Mr Flibble
10-25-2009, 04:43 PM
I assume notebook is Americanese for laptop?

I have an acer something-or-other. 160HD, 1gb RAM (sheesh...with Vista? Crap). I use MS Office 2007.


Vista ran like a dog on my little Asus - Windows 7. ;) Runs lovely.

Darzian
10-25-2009, 04:48 PM
i say laptop too. i thought notebook was a brand name, but i don't know.

Notebook and Laptop refer to the same thing. No brand name attached. "Notebook" is the more technical term while "Laptop" if the more common name.

OP: As per your last post, I then suggest a reasonably good laptop. If you don't game, then I recommend you stick to integrated graphics.

For various reasons, I almost never recommend a Mac unless you can pay for it. With Windows 7 out, I strongly recommend getting a PC based laptop with Win 7 but it's your choice.

Good luck. It can take forever to find your perfect computer. It took me a year. :)

MGraybosch
10-25-2009, 05:10 PM
I'd have to go with the MacBook. I've had one since they first came out in 2006, never had a problem with any of 'em, and when I upgrade, it'll probably be to one of the 13" MacBook Pros.

MGraybosch
10-25-2009, 05:12 PM
If you do need apps beyond word processing, a notebook is a better choice. But check it out. I loves me AlphaSmart!

If the screen could display more than six lines of text, I'd be interested. :)

scarletpeaches
10-25-2009, 05:23 PM
The small screen can be an advantage; I remember discussing this with KTC a couple of years back. It stops us going back, reading over, fiddling, editing.

At least...it did 'til I got my lovely netbook. ;)

Freelancer
10-25-2009, 05:37 PM
I have an Acer Aspire Gemstone Blue 8930. C2D 2Ghz, 4 Gb Ram, 9600GTS 1 Gb Ram, 320HD. Excellent for writing (It has a normal 101 keyboard, with a numeric pad included) and also it's an excellent multimedia computer with inbuilt 5.1 Dolby Home Theatre surround system, 18.4 16:9 WCG HDTV display up to 1920x1080 (Excellent for Blue Ray movies), inbuilt camera, WIFI and everything what a high-tech desktop computer ever had. Even the sound control have a small control keyboard. It's a bit large, but if you're traveling for a longer time and i.e. you want a small home theater into the hotel, this beauty is also perfect for this. :)

So this laptop is definitely not just for writing. I'm using also to make arts, it's also perfect for gaming, but it's a truth worthy beauty, which deserves it's name as it's really a little Blue Gemstone. It's an elegant and powerful Jaguar between the laptops. :)
http://gallery.techarena.in/data/513/medium/ACER_8930.jpg

scarletpeaches
10-25-2009, 05:38 PM
That is a droolworthy piece of machinery. *swoons*

MGraybosch
10-25-2009, 05:51 PM
The small screen can be an advantage; I remember discussing this with KTC a couple of years back. It stops us going back, reading over, fiddling, editing.

It also makes it unnecessarily difficult to refer to earlier material in order to avoid unnecessary continuity errors. :) And if you need to make sure your characters are using a particular bit of ordnance correctly, forget about being able to google it. :)

scarletpeaches
10-25-2009, 05:53 PM
Continuity errors! Good god, Plus One is full of them. That's what you get for copying tt42 and writing a novel out of sequence I guess.:)

/derail off

MGraybosch
10-25-2009, 05:53 PM
I have an Acer Aspire Gemstone Blue 8930. C2D 2Ghz, 4 Gb Ram, 9600GTS 1 Gb Ram, 320HD. Excellent for writing (It has a normal 101 keyboard, with a numeric pad included) and also it's an excellent multimedia computer with inbuilt 5.1 Dolby Home Theatre surround system, 18.4 16:9 WCG HDTV display up to 1920x1080 (Excellent for Blue Ray movies), inbuilt camera, WIFI and everything what a high-tech desktop computer ever had. Even the sound control have a small control keyboard. It's a bit large, but if you're traveling for a longer time and i.e. you want a small home theater into the hotel, this beauty is also perfect for this. :)

How far can you stretch the battery?

Freelancer
10-25-2009, 06:16 PM
How far can you stretch the battery?Approximately 3 hours 30-45 minutes if you run it on minimum config (It has a nice inbuilt Acer energy saver control panel where you can define how you'd like to use it in the Vista without any restart. For writing, the minimum configuration is perfect. In this case I also used to use some sort of music player in the background and in that case the computer already using the 5.1, and few other stuff is also used to run in the background that are using the computer. So maybe it's more if I wouldn't run these things in the background. For me this used to be the average, but maybe if I would shut down some stuff in it what I never use, maybe it would go above 4 hours. As for its maximum capability, when the CPU, the Video Card is at maximum, and the LCD is at maximum brightness, in that case its 2 hours, 2 hours 15 minutes as I experienced, but when I use it on maximum I always use it without battery.). The full battery recharge is app. 30-45 minutes. For me, that app. 3h30m is usually enough. So it has an average or a bit above average battery time in this category (High-tech Multimedia Laptops).

I never tried it with Windows 7, only with the inbuilt Vista 32, but maybe that would give a different result... maybe not.

Terie
10-25-2009, 06:20 PM
If the screen could display more than six lines of text, I'd be interested. :)

The Dana screen is larger than the Neo screen, which is why I chose that model. You can change the font size to display more or less. My old, bad eyes need a reasonably large font, and at my preferred size, it displays 7 lines.

I only use the Dana for first-drafting. I print out the MS every chapter (1.5 spaced, double-sided to save paper) and use that for continuity checking. I absolutely 100% canNOT edit or rewrite on the Dana. And if I'm going to be sitting in my computer room anyway, I write on the PC. But for writing in bed, or in the easy chair, or out in the garden, or down the pub, or at lunch on a work day, the Dana is great.

An AlphaSmart certainly isn't suitable for everyone, and I don't want to sound like I'm pushing them; it's just that a lot of writers have never heard of them, so I like to get the word out in case it will someone's needs. :) I originally got one because I have 'bad laptop flying karma' and won't take a laptop on a plane anymore, so getting a much less expensive, more durable device for when I'm travelling was my primary motive. Then I found out how handy it was for my everyday writing, too.

(And since the OP has clarified that an AlphaSmart isn't what they're after, if a mod wants to move this to its own topic, that's cool by me.)

scarletpeaches
10-25-2009, 06:20 PM
My netbook easily runs for 5, 6 hours at a time. The recharge is higher than most, but well worth it for the usage you get when out of the house.

MGraybosch
10-25-2009, 06:28 PM
\For me, that app. 3h30m is usually enough. So it has an average or a bit above average battery time in this category (High-tech Multimedia Laptops).

If I wasn't spoiled by 3 years of macbook ownership, that figure would impress me. Unfortunately, even the first-generation macbook gave me 4.5-5 hours when I turned off bluetooth/wifi, didn't play music, didn't run the optical drive, and ran nothing but Scrivener. And with the newest macbooks boasting 7 hours of battery life, I know who's making my next laptop. :)

Freelancer
10-25-2009, 06:37 PM
The difference is, you're not going to use any Mac to create high level 3D CGI animation, while I can do it on my one. Actually that was one of the primary reason why I bough this one, because I needed a laptop which, which can handle the high performance renders of 3D Max, can render everything under a very small render time even under extreme circumstances, also can handle the most complicated parts of After Effects perfectly and can handle other CGI programs that are requiring an ultimate performance, similar to desktop computers. This laptop almost has the very same performance what my desktop computer has (That's a C2D 3Ghz computer). So for me the battery's running time was one of the very last aspects when I've chosen this one as I needed this computer for both writing and to have a chance to make CGIs, movie after effecting and even high poly CGI animations. This beauty can handle all of the tasks perfectly.

maestrowork
10-25-2009, 09:01 PM
I had a kickass one for 3D graphics and all that stuff. It became obsolete because Microsoft decided XP was obsolete and gave us Shitzta. Then it died on me after only 3 years. Sometimes, no matter how awesome-looking the car is, you have to remember, it's still a GM car. :)

I use my laptop mostly for writing, music, and the occasional movie editing. I am interested in a Windows 7 netbook for traveling/writing -- and if that dies, it's only a $300 loss. But other than that, you can't get me back on the Windows PC bandwagon.

The Lonely One
10-25-2009, 09:21 PM
I use a SONY VAIO and it works just fine. I've always liked Sony electronics. Then again I could use (and have) giant old laptops on Windows 98. Mmmm....

timewaster
10-25-2009, 09:24 PM
If the only thing you want a notebook for is writing, you might consider an AlphaSmart (http://www.neo-direct.com/default.aspx) instead. It's essentially a Palm-powered word processing device with a full-sized keyboard (sans number pad). And VERY durable -- they're also made for kids to use at school.

If you do need apps beyond word processing, a notebook is a better choice. But check it out. I loves me AlphaSmart!

I've a small Toshiba notebook which I love. It has wifi, webcam and a load of gizmos I don't use. It runs windows and is small enough to fit in my handbag - about the size of a hardbacked book. I had a laptop but it was too heavy to carry easily and required one of those big laptop bags. The battery lasts only two to three hours but thus far that hasn't been a problem.

Freelancer
10-25-2009, 10:17 PM
Sometimes, no matter how awesome-looking the car is, you have to remember, it's still a GM car. :)
:D So true.

ejwriter
10-25-2009, 10:51 PM
excellent! i just logged in to the forums to post this very question, and here it is!

i have specific criteria, to expand on the OP, if someone doesn't mind making a suggestion...

i need a laptop that is light and small enough to carry in a large purse, but i also need a wide keyboard that will not cramp my fingers. i'd prefer a non-glossy screen.

i will primarily use this for writing, but if my desktop dies, i would need the laptop to be my backup computer for awhile, so i need at least the basic internet and video capabilities.

it sounds like there is the usual mac/pc split here, and i am open to both systems, although i am leaning toward mac.

The Lonely One
10-25-2009, 10:52 PM
:D So true.
http://www.newcarpark.com/blog/images2/2009-Chevrolet-Camaro.jpg

I'm sorry, were you guys saying something? :D

The Lonely One
10-25-2009, 10:56 PM
excellent! i just logged in to the forums to post this very question, and here it is!

i have specific criteria, to expand on the OP, if someone doesn't mind making a suggestion...

i need a laptop that is light and small enough to carry in a large purse, but i also need a wide keyboard that will not cramp my fingers. i'd prefer a non-glossy screen.

i will primarily use this for writing, but if my desktop dies, i would need the laptop to be my backup computer for awhile, so i need at least the basic internet and video capabilities.

it sounds like there is the usual mac/pc split here, and i am open to both systems, although i am leaning toward mac.

I pretty much will never buy a Mac, just because I am stubborn that way. I don't see it as having an advantage for business-based programs like word processors or spreadsheets. I do think Mac is superior in multimedia (audio editing programs, video production, music in general, etc.). But if anyone is looking for a notebook/laptop/whatever for writing only purposes, go cheap, man. Seriously. Get a netbook or if you don't like the keyboard, a full-sized lower-end model. I think a lot of computers are priced on their graphics capabilities, not their ability to hold your wordcount. Plus you can always expand on internet storage or external drives, and pretty much any laptop you buy will have enough storage for any amount of text you can dish out.

Freelancer
10-25-2009, 11:35 PM
i need a laptop that is light and small enough to carry in a large purse, but i also need a wide keyboard that will not cramp my fingers. i'd prefer a non-glossy screen.Try the new generation Acers. Scarlett and I have Acers and they're pretty good by our opinion.

Check the following ones, Aspire 4935, Aspire 5739. The others above from the same design, such as the Aspire 7738 and the Aspire 8930 would be large to you, but the first two are small ones.

bsolah
10-26-2009, 02:19 AM
I'd like to weigh in my vote for a MacBook or a MacBook Pro.

I've been using laptops for three years now and just switched to a MacBook Pro 13" and loving it. The computer is so nice and smooth and feels solid and reliable.

The Operating System is simple and there's no fuss with writing programs or anything. Such a dream to work with.

Pepper
10-26-2009, 04:47 AM
Sorry, I haven't read the other posts, but here's my response to the OP.....

My father fixes computers (his second but hugely time-consuming job), and he prefers Toshiba laptops/notebooks over all else. He just never has problems with Toshibas. The only Toshibas he has walk through his door are ones that need viruses cleared off (kids who like to download crap off the net shouldn't be allowed to have computers).

Dell, on the other hand, he gets in ALL the time. Ditto to HP computers & laptops. They're cheap, but he's never heard of one going longer than a year without buggering up in one way or another.

Mac computers and laptops don't seem to have any issues per se, but when something does blow, it's a pig to get the thing fixed. They are also virtually impossible to upgrade. If you want an upgrade, you buy a new laptop.

My family has owned two Toshiba laptops. One of these has gone to my sister, who breaks pretty much everything she touches. That Toshiba has been running fine in her hands for 6 years now, without so much as a single issue. In HER hands!
The other laptop has been in the family for 4 years now, and again, no issues.

There's an itty bitty Toshiba notebook up for sale at around $700 (AU). It has a dvd burner and has the best gear on the inside. My fingers are long and skinny, but the keyboard doesn't feel too small. It could fit in my purse no problems. As soon as I get the money together, I'm buying one. It doesn't look uber-cool like some of the other notebooks out there, but at least I know the sucker won't bust on me.

Regan Leigh
10-26-2009, 04:54 AM
I <3 my MacBook. :) I used to have a Dell (inspirion I think??) and it was hell.

MGraybosch
10-26-2009, 05:29 AM
Mac computers and laptops don't seem to have any issues per se, but when something does blow, it's a pig to get the thing fixed. They are also virtually impossible to upgrade. If you want an upgrade, you buy a new laptop.

As somebody who had no trouble upgrading the memory and hard drive on his first macbook, I say "Bullshit".

MGraybosch
10-26-2009, 05:31 AM
The difference is, you're not going to use any Mac to create high level 3D CGI animation, while I can do it on my one

If I insisted on a Mac for that kind of work, I'd probably get a Mac Pro and pimp it out.

bsolah
10-26-2009, 06:32 AM
My father fixes computers (his second but hugely time-consuming job), and he prefers Toshiba laptops/notebooks over all else. He just never has problems with Toshibas. The only Toshibas he has walk through his door are ones that need viruses cleared off (kids who like to download crap off the net shouldn't be allowed to have computers).

I'll second this. For Windows machines, Toshibas are the best. They're reliable and used on for 3 years.


As somebody who had no trouble upgrading the memory and hard drive on his first macbook, I say "Bullshit".

QFT.

Fenika
10-26-2009, 06:39 AM
Another vote for toshiba. I have the NB205-N210. It's the $350 version and I'm glad I didn't get the 400 version (adds bluetooth, different keyboard, non-fingerprinting surface and other stuff I didn't care about). I switched out the ram for 2gigs for 40$ and I'm using it as my primary and only computer. Monitor is a mite small but that's more an annoyance, and at home I just plug it in to a 17" monitor (Acer model for about 100$) that's resting on books and can thus not strain my neck.

maestrowork
10-26-2009, 07:10 AM
As somebody who had no trouble upgrading the memory and hard drive on his first macbook, I say "Bullshit".

:) I did have a problem but the Apple Store fixed it just fine. Also, my friend's MPB did fail, but Apple replaced the WHOLE thing free of charge for him.

Now, try that with a PC dealer.

maestrowork
10-26-2009, 07:13 AM
i need a laptop that is light and small enough to carry in a large purse, but i also need a wide keyboard that will not cramp my fingers. i'd prefer a non-glossy screen.

One of those netbooks seems like your best bet, if you're willing to stay with Windows 7. The Acer or HP, I think, has full-sized keyboard (not the mini keys some models have). 10.2" (diagonal) screen is good enough for writing and surfing the web. They're usually under $350 so it's a good buy. I'm looking into getting one myself for travel (my MacBook Pro can read/write Word/Excel files).

Pepper
10-26-2009, 07:18 AM
Maybe I'm a bit behind with Macs. A few years back I found Macs to be overly expensive for what they offered, and only had very limited potential to upgrade. More often than not, needing any worthwhile upgrade meant buying a new Mac.

In any case, I'll stick with getting me a Toshiba. :D

maestrowork
10-26-2009, 07:20 AM
I pretty much will never buy a Mac, just because I am stubborn that way. I don't see it as having an advantage for business-based programs like word processors or spreadsheets.


You're pretty stubborn (and a bit uninformed). :) My friends, who are in IT and corporate, more and less all switched to the Mac -- the whole thing about business software is a bogus argument now. A) MS Office is available on the Mac, and B) iWork is lighter, faster, and much more easier to use than MS Deadweight, and C) not to mention there is Open Office which runs on all platforms, plus a slew of open source suites. The "office software" gap has been closed.

The only things that the PC still do better are a) CAD software and b) gaming. But unless you're a CAD user or gamer, that would be a moot point. In fact, a friend of mine just made a comment today about how Warcraft™ looked and played better on the Mac than on the PC.



But if anyone is looking for a notebook/laptop/whatever for writing only purposes, go cheap, man. Seriously.

I can't fault that logic, and I myself are looking for a cheap netbook for writing/traveling. At $250-350 each, you can't go wrong with it (as long as you don't depend your life on it -- make back ups OFTEN).

maestrowork
10-26-2009, 07:30 AM
Maybe I'm a bit behind with Macs. A few years back I found Macs to be overly expensive for what they offered, and only had very limited potential to upgrade. More often than not, needing any worthwhile upgrade meant buying a new Mac.

It depends on what you meant by upgrades. Memory/storage upgrades are no problems. Processor upgrades? Most people don't do that with PCs anyway. As for peripherals, most everything is now plug and play (USB or firewire) so it's not an issue either.

In fact, I see the constant "upgrade" thing a detriment for the PCs. I've owned a whole gamut of PCs (both desktops and laptops) from DELL to IBM to Toshiba, and because of the clunkiness of Windows, they often slowed to a crawl after a few years and it often seemed like I had to upgrade in order to keep up the speed.

Unless you're an IT pros and you like to build/upgrade PCs (i.e. normal, everyday users), that's not really something to be concerned about.

I've owned the MBP (1.83 GHz core duo, 1.5GB RAM) for four years now and I did not have to upgrade hardware at all. With OS 10.6 it ran even faster than I first got it. The OS upgrade process has been a breeze compared to the Vista's process (which is cumbersome and slow). It takes less than 1 minute to cold boot, and mere seconds to shut down. I have NEVER had a laptop that lasted this long without either dying or needing a major upgrade.

But yes, the Macs are expensive. But yes, they're coming down in prices to be more competitive. These machines are really solid, quality stuff and you can have a Macbook for under $1000 now, or a 27" iMac for about $2000. Considering how long they will last, the virus/hassle-free environment, upgrade paths (Snow Leopard, for example, was only $30 compared to Windows 7 at $199), they are good investments.

bsolah
10-26-2009, 07:35 AM
I've become a Mac fanboy. I agree with everything Ray's said.

The expensive investment toward a MacBook feels so worth it.

ejwriter
10-26-2009, 07:47 AM
thanks everyone.
this is a very helpful thread!

Pesimisticus
10-26-2009, 07:29 PM
OK, I just had to jump into this one.

I'm a full-out computer geek--I write fulltime for one of those geeky gadgets websites you've probably heard of at one time or another...anyway, I used Windows since '95, then used Ubuntu for two years or so as my primary, then went back to Vista, then Windows 7 because I needed to run Adobe products.

Missing Ubuntu, I decided to get the 13-inch Macbook after my 4-year-old Dell gave up the ghost, mostly because the Mac was as close to the Ubuntu as I could get while still using commercial software.

I freaking love the Mac. It is awesome. I don't want to sound like a fanboy, but really--just awesome. So smooth, so fast, so pretty.

I got the base $999 Macbook because I know that most people don't require the specs they think they do--I did more with a 1.6GHz duo core with 1GB of RAM than any salesperson would ever let you know was possible.

http://www.copystars.com/images_products/apple_macbook_s20001.jpg

I guess what I'm saying is--don't completely count it out. A Macbook is a beautiful piece of hardware.