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Canotila
10-21-2009, 02:57 AM
I am on a mystical quest to find a less dated synonym for booger, that doesn't sound as scientific as mucous.

What do ya'll have? I was surprised to find that there is no formal dictionary word for "booger". Either that or my vocabulary is sadly lacking. Help?

Melisande
10-21-2009, 04:04 AM
I googled;

http://dictionary.sensagent.com/booger/en-en/

Seems to be a fortune in 'booger' synonyms right there

cptwentworth
10-21-2009, 04:05 AM
My kids call it a dirty nose.

sheadakota
10-21-2009, 04:08 AM
Snot ?

MattW
10-21-2009, 04:10 AM
Nose goblins?

Perks
10-21-2009, 04:11 AM
I can't read this thread. Just the title is making me cry.

I hate you people.

William Haskins
10-21-2009, 04:18 AM
depending on your level of familiarity with it, "boog" or "boogie" might be appropriate.

in my experience, it depends on the booger.

Stew21
10-21-2009, 04:19 AM
I'm with you, Perks.


If booger doesn't cover it, I don't need to say it.

Eldritch
10-21-2009, 04:29 AM
A nose crusty?

CACTUSWENDY
10-21-2009, 04:39 AM
Hey, I'm using that word in my book. In fact, used it a couple of times....lol...booger is just a really great word.

Rolling Thunder
10-21-2009, 04:45 AM
Substitute Haggis or Robeiae; either should be acceptable.


...

...

...

Oh. You don't mean here on AW. How about nostril candy?

Canotila
10-21-2009, 04:54 AM
You guys are awesome! Keep 'em coming!

In our house we call them mocos.

The only problem with boogers is they are too hilarious. I'm trying to write a scene where the protag is hiding in fear under a desk, and she notices a pretty hefty dried booger deposit on the underside of the desk near her head. The word booger feels kind of jarring, ha ha. Oh well.

My other issue is booger seems to be solid modern American slang. What did they call them during the revolutionary war? What do Australians call them? Victorians? I refuse to believe that only people in our modern times have bothered naming such an awesome...object?

I'm writing fantasy, maybe it's just time to make up some nifty word combo fitting for their world (something along the lines of nose goblins).

Nostril candy, ah ha ha ha!

Rolling Thunder
10-21-2009, 04:59 AM
Ah, gotcha. How about phlegm instead of mucus?

Kris
10-21-2009, 05:03 AM
My daughter (3yo) calls them "nosies." If she has a runny nose she says "my nose is nosey."

When I was young I called them snotties. I still can't use the term "snot" or "booger."

johnnysannie
10-21-2009, 05:38 AM
Snot balls?

StephanieFox
10-21-2009, 05:46 AM
This is why I became a writer for the intellectual stimulation and the chance to share the love of language with my peers.

Eldritch
10-21-2009, 04:09 PM
Don't the Brits call them "Bogies" or "bogeys"? In the first HP movie, when Harry pulls his wand out of the troll's nose, Ron says something like, "Eww, troll bogies."

Just checked that scene in my (American) copy of the book, and it's spelled "boogers".


Also, just stumbled across this one:
Nose wax.

Misa Buckley
10-21-2009, 04:16 PM
This is why I became a writer for the intellectual stimulation and the chance to share the love of language with my peers.

Quote of the day :D

RobinGBrown
10-21-2009, 04:17 PM
I can confirm that Brits call them bogeys

K.Bristow
11-18-2009, 08:02 AM
Please don't call them Haggis - its really a food (ok I wouldn't eat it but it really is a food)
My English hubby calls them "snotters" and my Auntie calls them "nose gems"
I'm going to go vomit now.

scarletpeaches
11-18-2009, 08:05 AM
depending on your level of familiarity with it, "boog" or "boogie" might be appropriate.

in my experience, it depends on the booger.As a Brit who's more familiar with the noun 'bogey', I'm interested to know your preference between slimey rollers and crusty flickers, Haskins?

poetinahat
11-18-2009, 08:06 AM
When you wipe them on your pants leg, they become trouser-grout.

(not really; I'm just trying to coin a phrase)

Priene
11-18-2009, 01:53 PM
What we need now is to discuss the difference between gobbing, flobbing and flegging.

dpaterso
11-18-2009, 02:48 PM
I can confirm that Brits call them bogeys
North of the border, they're snorters.

A bogey is a racing cart (home-made with old pram wheels in the "Oor Willie" tradition), and kids shout "Game's a bogey!" whenever a game is rendered invalid by blatant rule-breaking, thus recalling participants for rule discussion and game restart.

-Derek

Rufus Coppertop
11-18-2009, 03:30 PM
Nasal crust.

RJK
11-18-2009, 05:54 PM
In Vegas, because of the dry air they call them nose boulders.

K.Bristow
11-18-2009, 05:55 PM
You know...at midnight when I finally signed off, I laughed for about 15 minutes at how intense our quest has become for the perfect synonym for booger. This morning - I'm still laughing!!!

Chase
11-18-2009, 08:59 PM
I'm with Sheadakota:

If you kiss your honey,
And her nose is runny,
Don't think it's honey,
'Cause it's not ('cause it's snot)

Dawnny Baby
11-18-2009, 11:41 PM
"Nose pickings" might be an acceptable Revolutionary War term?

But in my house, when my tots have the green slimeys running down to their lips, we call them "snot rockets."

(As a mom, this thread is waaaaay up my alley! :D)

Mike Martyn
11-19-2009, 01:43 AM
Green gold.

As in "The kid was rooting around in his nose for some of that green gold" http://absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon8.gif

Ariella
11-19-2009, 03:10 AM
Random trivia: I once read in a very dry work of onomastics that Nottingham was originally spelled Snotingaham and that the name means "the hamlet of the followers of Snot." Snot, as it turns out, was a Viking whose name in Old Norse means ... snot.

Chase
11-19-2009, 09:38 PM
Random trivia: I once read in a very dry work of onomastics that Nottingham was originally spelled Snotingaham and that the name means "the hamlet of the followers of Snot." Snot, as it turns out, was a Viking whose name in Old Norse means ... snot.

The spin put onto old names is often hilarious. My last name happens to be Nottingham, so I found its origins of interest when studying Old English in grad school. According to my text way back then, the name was, indeed, Snot-inge-ham, but it meant "smart-people's-home." The term "snot" still carries some of the meaning today, as a snot can mean a smart aleck.

Irishgirl
11-21-2009, 11:08 PM
I'm trying to write a scene where the protag is hiding in fear under a desk, and she notices a pretty hefty dried booger deposit on the underside of the desk near her head.

As in 'She found a coveted deposit of nose gold underneath the desk'? Sometimes you think funny things when you are scared, then you wonder if you're going to live long enough to tell someone about it.

Ms Hollands
11-23-2009, 11:36 AM
We called them greenies when I was a kid, but I guess that's changed to a more environmental meaning now...

Also:
Lugies (to "hock a lugie" is to dig out some boogers either manually or by blowing hard)

...and my recent favourite for the act of picking one's nose: "digging for treasure" - I love that term!

brokenfingers
11-23-2009, 02:21 PM
I prefer nose nugget.