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View Full Version : The NY Public Library is in the Book Selling Business?



Williebee
10-05-2009, 06:35 AM
Article here (http://www.prweb.com/releases/2009/10/prweb2966234.htm)


Rochester, NY (PRWEB) October 1, 2009 -- Readers and researchers looking for hard-to-find books now have the opportunity to dip into the collections of one of the world's most comprehensive libraries to purchase digitized copies of public domain titles. Through their Digitize-on-Demand program, Kirtas Technologies has partnered with The New York Public Library to make 500,000 public domain works from the Library's collections available (to anyone in the world).

hmmm guess that's a way to fund a library.

JoNightshade
10-05-2009, 06:39 AM
I was on their website the other day looking through their digital archive of medieval manuscripts (trying to get images for a little art project) and discovered that you can pay for prints of basically any page. Very cool, in my opinion.

William Haskins
10-05-2009, 06:42 AM
every effort should always be made to fully honor any copyright. but with stuff that's truly in the public domain, i say let it proliferate. it's wonderful. every kid in every town will have access to every text that can possible be preserved and made available.

Medievalist
10-05-2009, 07:18 AM
I was on their website the other day looking through their digital archive of medieval manuscripts (trying to get images for a little art project) and discovered that you can pay for prints of basically any page. Very cool, in my opinion.

Check out the British Library too--often they will waive fees if you are not printing/distributing/selling.

Medievalist
10-05-2009, 07:19 AM
every effort should always be made to fully honor any copyright. but with stuff that's truly in the public domain, i say let it proliferate. it's wonderful. every kid in every town will have access to every text that can possible be preserved and made available.

Yep.

Though I do wish they would work more at actually digitizing the text--not just presenting images of the pages.

blacbird
10-05-2009, 08:03 AM
hmmm guess that's a way to fund a library.

Well, yeah, it is. What exactly is your objection?

caw

Nadia
10-05-2009, 08:17 AM
I don't see anything wrong w/ it as long as the works are in public domain. People get the books they need and the library may get some money it needs to fund its projects, buy new books, etc.

veinglory
10-05-2009, 06:57 PM
Looks like a good idea to me.

Williebee
10-05-2009, 07:12 PM
Well, yeah, it is. What exactly is your objection?

caw

You misunderstand me, sir. Or better, I have made myself misunderstood.

I came across this right after sitting through a local public library discussion wherein they were talking about getting rid of the really old books, because "no one checks them out", and "it costs money to store them and keep them preserved".

They also don't like it when people come in "and just use the computers".

:(

veinglory
10-05-2009, 10:25 PM
I don't see the connection. Yes, old books that aren't checked out need to be culled, and a library is meant to be more than a free internet cafe.

It seems to me that making truly valuable old books available digitally, probably at or near cost, is a different kettle of fish altogether.

Williebee
10-05-2009, 11:45 PM
internet cafe? meh. it isn't about people surfing myspace, etc.

A reference library should allow it's users to access the reference capabilities of the web. The user's shouldn't have to check out a book as the ticket to use that resource.

And then, from there, you get into a discussion of limiting people's time on the terminal, content filtering, age appropriateness....