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View Full Version : No research allowed -- have you ever heard of Homer Plessey?



Barb D
10-03-2009, 11:40 PM
Who was Homer Plessy and what did he do?
No research, and no peeking at other answers.
I'm trying to find out how common knowledge he is.

Poll coming.

Puma
10-03-2009, 11:44 PM
I'm not sure how to respond - if I ever did hear of him (which is a possibility considering my college major), he's long forgotten. Puma

Perks
10-03-2009, 11:47 PM
Yeah, I said I never heard of him, but it's possible I did and just didn't load it into the permanent archives.

raburrell
10-03-2009, 11:49 PM
I'm assuming Plessey vs. Ferguson? If so... yes.

Barb D
10-03-2009, 11:52 PM
I'm assuming ...? If so... yes.

That's the one.

aadams73
10-04-2009, 12:34 AM
Was he involved in: a race relations issue about a century or so back? I don't remember the details, but Homer isn't a common name. Please bear in mind that American History isn't my strength as I wasn't raised over here.

mscelina
10-04-2009, 12:36 AM
Yes, I do. I heard a lot about the Supreme Court decision when I was a kid in the south. It doesn't bring up pleasant memories.

However, if you're asking if most people would recognize a casual reference to him in a story, the answer would be no. I'd be willing to bet less than 10% of the population could actually reference his relevancy off of just his name, even people familiar with Brown vs the Board of Education.

icerose
10-04-2009, 02:59 AM
I am absolutely terrible with names. I do remember hearing his name but couldn't remember what had happened. After I answered your poll question I read it and it brought back the memories.

Anyone mentioning his name in text or in passing conversation I would never be able to relate to it.

AnonymousWriter
10-04-2009, 03:05 AM
Never heard of him.

alleycat
10-04-2009, 03:10 AM
The name sort of sounds familiar, but to be honest I couldn't tell you who he is or what he did.

Kitty27
10-04-2009, 03:31 AM
Yes,I have.

He was the nineteenth century version of Rosa Parks,only his story didn't turn out so well.

JulieHowe
10-04-2009, 05:56 AM
Without peeking on the internet - Plessy vs. Ferguson was a legal case that I think went all the way to the US Supreme Court. I believe that it paved the way for legal racial discrimination (i.e. the Jim Crow laws) by clarifying that 'separate but equal' was just fine.

Dicentra P
10-04-2009, 06:00 AM
I do know but his history is more personally relevant to me.

Barb D
10-04-2009, 07:28 AM
Thanks, everyone. I didn't know whether I hadn't heard of him because I live under a rock or if he really wasn't commonly known. I'm sorry to hear that his story is not very well known.

He was a 1/8th black man who challenged the Jim Crow laws in Louisiana by attempting to ride in a "whites only" train car. He took the case all the way to the Supreme Court, where he lost. According to the Supreme Court, as long as it was "separate but equal" racial discrimination was fine. Of course, nothing was equal.

I'm considering adding a Plessy-like incident to my WIP.

Wayne K
10-04-2009, 07:41 AM
Couldn't they have declared that he wasn't Criminally Black?

I can't believe some of the shit that's been done in history. but It does make me happy for how far we've come. I'd love to the one to go to hell and tell them.

And a pox on their souls for the hate and hurt caused by their decision.

Barb D
10-04-2009, 08:37 AM
It does make me happy for how far we've come.

It's hard to believe that this was going on just a hundred years ago -- a blip on the historical radar. And segregation of course went on much longer than that.

Smish
10-04-2009, 08:51 AM
Do you mean Homer Plessy (not Plessey)?

If so, yes, I know quite a lot. But only because I went to law school.

However, my mother is a US history teacher now (she went back to college after all of her bratty kids were out of the house :) ), and she covers Plessy v. Ferguson in her classes. I don't think it was covered when I was in high school.

:)Smish

blacbird
10-04-2009, 10:32 AM
No.

That's the short answer. The long answer is:

Nope.

caw

ChristineR
10-04-2009, 08:47 PM
At first I was like, "Damn! I know that name." When I googled it, I said "Of course, that guy." We did study it in high school.

Barb D
10-09-2009, 07:37 PM
Thank you, everyone. I did decide to include a reference to him in my WIP. There's an excerpt on the Historical SYW board:

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=4129715#post4129715

Clair Dickson
10-09-2009, 07:58 PM
My vote may not count... I'm a teacher of US History.

Apsu
10-09-2009, 08:58 PM
Without looking at replies, I'm going to say: Plessey vs Ferguson.

Do I win?

ETA, I guess not, now that I see I have his name misspelled, and others got there first.

MsGneiss
10-09-2009, 09:33 PM
Yes, I remember Plessy v Ferguson from my 9th grade Constitutional Law class, although the details escape me. I think the case is pretty standard in most US History textbooks.

benbradley
10-09-2009, 10:17 PM
Thank you, everyone. I did decide to include a reference to him in my WIP. There's an excerpt on the Historical SYW board:

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=4129715#post4129715
I've sure heard of Homer Plessy now...

geardrops
10-09-2009, 10:54 PM
I only did research to double-check that I was right :) Didn't want to find out "Oh crap, there's another Plessy?"

Then again, I wouldn't rate him or what he was involved in as "common knowledge." Even if you give the name of the case. At least not here in the states.

(I did very well in my AP histories :) )

ideagirl
10-11-2009, 01:38 AM
Who was Homer Plessy and what did he do?
No research, and no peeking at other answers.
I'm trying to find out how common knowledge he is.

Poll coming.

I assume he was the plaintiff in Plessy v. Ferguson, a US Supreme Court case that had to do with racial segregation. It was either the case in about the 1890s that affirmed that separate but equal was ok, or it was the case in about the 1940s that prohibited race-based restrictive covenants in the sale of houses (i.e. house deeds that prohibited sale of the house to black people).