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Rose English
10-03-2009, 11:06 PM
I got rid of most of mine.

My mum warned me I'd regret throwing books away, but I was certain I'd never want to look at that 'crap' again. How wrong I was.

Now I have all these story fragments in my mind, driving me nuts. I can't remember the book titles and recently it's become important to me to re-read them from an adult perspective.

To give you an example, there was a story about a sick child who made sketches, and then dreamt about the sketches, which took on a life of their own. Something like that. It was a little creepy. Somebody was imprisoned, I think. Or that's what it seemed like at the time. Oppressive.

I've googled U.K publishing lists from the *ahem* mid to late 70's (I read well from an early age) but nothing jumps out at me.

Bet you guys were smarter. Bet you have your books lovingly stashed in a cupboard/closet in alphabetical order ;)

Just throwing this out there to see what comes back...mods please move if appropriate, thank you!

mscelina
10-03-2009, 11:07 PM
Yes, I kept all of them and still have them. Still read some of them occasionally. My daughters read them. And soon, their daughters will read them.

It's a good thing. :)

Shakesbear
10-03-2009, 11:15 PM
I've had to replace most of mine. Some I gave to my niece and have had the pleasure of seeing her grow into a bibliophile. Some have been made into TV series and/or films - Cranford, Lord of the Rings, Sense and Sensibility.

Ken
10-03-2009, 11:17 PM
... titles, people, titles: so us folk with a bent for nostalgia can reminisce :-)
(No longer have any of my own childhood books. Don't think I owned any, actually. Comics in Bazooka Joe bubble gum were the usual fare for me.)

aadams73
10-03-2009, 11:20 PM
My mother recently sent me my very first book: Lois Lenski's Spring Is Here. It has a cloth cover and yellowing pages, but...yeah, I got quite teary when I opened that package.

I laughed when I noticed a couple of old food stains on the pages. Even that far back I liked to read while I ate. I'm just neater now. :)

scarletpeaches
10-03-2009, 11:21 PM
The first book I remember making an impression on me is The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. That's the one which kicked off a lifelong love affair with the written word. I didn't know stories could do that.

Izz
10-03-2009, 11:23 PM
Yeah, i've still got all of mine. I've had to creatively layer my bookshelf to get all my books in there, but that only worked for a short time. I may sell some of them. Really, i only need one Hardy Boys book if i ever want to remind myself what they were like.

bylinebree
10-03-2009, 11:24 PM
No. I wasn't given the choice to keep them, they just went by the wayside somehow. Mom wasn't sentimental.

Fortunately, I have reclaimed some of my very favorites: at a garage sale, I found a whole set of Childcraft books, and also bought new, the entire works on Winnie-the-Pooh with original illustrations!

It was thrilling to read those old poems in Childcraft again, the cadence of the classic stories, fairy tales, and poetry echoing deep in my soud. It was so fun to share those with my children, too.

And I'm pretty sure that my early exposure to that lit influenced me to eventually become a writer.

Thank heaven that, even if we didn't get to SAVE our books, we can still find and enjoy them!!

On the other hand (or maybe in rebound) I have saved all of my own kids' books! Some day, they might want them...
:)

Adam
10-03-2009, 11:28 PM
Most of my childhood books were from the library. The few that I owned are in the attic somewhere.

I don't intend to re-read them, as they won't live up to the memories I have of them. :)

EDIT - Just for Ken - My faves were the Narnia, Brer Rabbit and Peter Rabbit series. Also, whatever my mum had just finished reading. ;)

mscelina
10-03-2009, 11:33 PM
Titles? About 400 of them. But just from what I see on the bookshelves closest to me:

--The Narnia series
--Little House on the Prairie series
--Betsy-Tacy series
--Anne of Green Gables series
--all of Alcott
--all of Twain
--all of Austen
--some Gladys Malvern, in particular Behold Your Queen! (story of Esther)
--David Eddings' Belgariad
--Tolkien's The Hobbit, LOTR, and the Silmarillon
--about forty kid biographies on people ranging from Abigail Adams to Thomas Edison
--my collection (started when I was eight) of Lewis Carroll, including eleven Victorian editions of Through the Looking Glass and Alice in Wonderland
--The Black Cauldron series by Lloyd Alexander
--Madeline L'Engle's A Wrinkle In Time, which is dog-eared and beat to blazes
--TH White's The Once and Future King
--an absolutely lovely Mother Goose book with gorgeous illustrations my grandmother sent me from London when I was five

...

I'd have to get up to see more.

Rarri
10-03-2009, 11:35 PM
Some of them; the special ones. The most special being: Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, which is in fact my mother's copy from when she was a child and is now read to Rarri Jr; her Beatrix Potter books will soon be read to Rarri Jr too. I've looked over some of the books i read as a young teenager and it was a slightly strange experience but i enjoyed them nonetheless. Several of the books i enjoyed as a child are now in my toddler's growing book collection and i love that. :)

virtue_summer
10-04-2009, 12:34 AM
I still have my favorite childhood book: The World's Best Fairy Tales. It was an anthology put out by Reader's Digest, the edition I have being an eight hundred page hardback with a red and gold cover. My dad used to read to me and my brother every night when we were kids and it was always from this book. I think I treasure it more than any other I own. I don't actually have a lot of other books that I read or that people read to me as a kid. Most came from the library. Others have been lost or donated.

Ken
10-04-2009, 12:35 AM
... I wish I'd taken an interest in reading as a kid, like yourself. Did read a few of the ones you've listed including:
Madeline L'Engle's A Wrinkle In Time (Had forgotten all about this classic. Must reread it!)
And this one too that Adz mentioned:
Peter Rabbit series (Awesome illustrations, as I recall, along with good tales.)

MaryMumsy
10-04-2009, 12:42 AM
I don't have a single one. Grew up in the military, moving frequently. We just couldn't haul all that stuff along every time. If we had kept everything we would have needed three moving vans instead of one. There are things from my childhood I wish I still had, but those books aren't them.

MM

mscelina
10-04-2009, 12:46 AM
My only interests as a kid were reading, writing and theater. My mother used to lock me out of the house in the summer to force me to go play.

Some things don't really change except my bike is bigger now. :)

alleycat
10-04-2009, 01:28 AM
My mother moved from Tennessee to Atlanta earlier this year to live with my brother and sister-in-law. While packing, they put anything that had once belonged to me (and a few things that didn't) in boxes and sent it all home with me, including old school yearbooks and some of the books I had when I was a child. I hadn't seen or thought of these books in years, so it was kind of fun to look at them again.


... titles, people, titles: so us folk with a bent for nostalgia can reminisce.
I now have my copy of Lassie and the Lost Explorer. Timmy and Lassie save a family of raccoons, but Timmy almost gets killed himself when lightning strikes a nearby tree. Lassie pushes him away from the falling tree just in time. ;-)

MissKris
10-04-2009, 01:31 AM
Oh boy. I remember having ever so many Babysitter's Club and Sweet Valley High books, all of which were packed up sometime after my parents split and were subsequently lost. I don't mourn those at all.

I did manage to keep my Anne of Green Gables for years until too many were missing their covers and falling apart. I finally bought a new set three years ago.

My childhood bookshelf burst at the seams (literally. I was eight the first time I snuck my dad's hammer and some nails into the house and hammered it all back in place) but I can't remember half of what used to be on it now.

ChaosTitan
10-04-2009, 01:34 AM
Most of my originals from Middle Grade up I kept. Those that I gave away or sold for some silly reason, I've started buying again as I find them at book sales and flea markets. The majority of the children's books we had, though, are gone. I've been replacing them, too, though, so I have them for my niece to read when she's old enough.

Rose English
10-04-2009, 01:53 AM
And I'm pretty sure that my early exposure to that lit influenced me to eventually become a writer.


Yes, this is part of my motivation for starting this thread. I would stay up all night to finish a book, never mind about school in the morning. Why? What could be so absorbing about the plot in a childs book? Was it to do with having a greater capacity to imagine? Or something else?

How does what we read then inform what we read and write now? The books I enjoyed as a child seem a little on the dark or alternative side, I sought that then and now, it appears.



I don't intend to re-read them, as they won't live up to the memories I have of them.

Ah yes. I would be concerned about this too. If only I could find them. But wouldn't it be interesting? Or does analysing writing automatically 'ruin' the experience (hope I don't sound argumentative, just interested in what you think).


Titles? About 400 of them.

Wow, that's impressive! So many classics too. Mine included (for Ken who likes the titles) Stig of the Dump, The Wolves of Willoughby Chase (okay, so that's more early 80's) Roald Dahl's Danny the Champion of the World, and the Henry Sugar one - off the top of my head. There are many more.


Several of the books i enjoyed as a child are now in my toddler's growing book collection and i love that. :)

I love that too. If my son 'loses' when I'm distracted by my writing, I hope he 'gains' by acquiring a love of words. Interesting how many of us are replacing old favourites - how does that work with Kindle, I wonder?

Rose English
10-04-2009, 01:57 AM
My mother recently sent me my very first book: Lois Lenski's Spring Is Here. It has a cloth cover and yellowing pages, but...yeah, I got quite teary when I opened that package.

I laughed when I noticed a couple of old food stains on the pages. Even that far back I liked to read while I ate. I'm just neater now. :)

I totally get this. Mine, if I still had them would be all wrinkly and wavy paged from the bath, and dog eared from reading under the blankets.:)

Ken
10-04-2009, 04:25 AM
More Lassie books:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lassie

Looking forward to reading them all now that I know about them.
Thnx Alleycat. YA nature books are my favorite genre, next to the classics.

icerose
10-04-2009, 04:28 AM
Being the youngest of 7 meant nothing was left for me by the time everyone else had moved out and taken what they wanted. Not even the books specifically bought for me like "Mother, I Want Another" and "The Hungry Catepillar" and "The Plant Sitter." Not to mention the children's encyclopedia, the adult encyclopedia, our two big beautiful dictionaries. *Sigh* I just didn't get any dibs on any of those.

KTC
10-04-2009, 04:30 AM
I have quite a few of mine. I have a dozen or so of my Dr. Seuss. I have a whole collection of Hardy Boys and a slew of my Roald Dahl books...and so many more. Some of them are in pretty good condition. They have been re-used by my own children too. They are pretty much grown now...and they look on these books with affection...as though they are their childhood books. They are sadly mistaken. The day they try to remove them from this house is the day they die! I will happily read these books to my grandchildren...but only if they're visiting. (-;

Matera the Mad
10-04-2009, 04:31 AM
There is one I don't have that tears me up every time I think about it. :(

KTC
10-04-2009, 04:32 AM
Titles? About 400 of them. But just from what I see on the bookshelves closest to me:

--The Narnia series
--Little House on the Prairie series
--Betsy-Tacy series
--Anne of Green Gables series
--all of Alcott
--all of Twain
--all of Austen
--some Gladys Malvern, in particular Behold Your Queen! (story of Esther)
--David Eddings' Belgariad
--Tolkien's The Hobbit, LOTR, and the Silmarillon
--about forty kid biographies on people ranging from Abigail Adams to Thomas Edison
--my collection (started when I was eight) of Lewis Carroll, including eleven Victorian editions of Through the Looking Glass and Alice in Wonderland
--The Black Cauldron series by Lloyd Alexander
--Madeline L'Engle's A Wrinkle In Time, which is dog-eared and beat to blazes
--TH White's The Once and Future King
--an absolutely lovely Mother Goose book with gorgeous illustrations my grandmother sent me from London when I was five

...

I'd have to get up to see more.


Oh yes...I have the Alcott books, Green Gables, Twain's books and the Little House books too. My daughter so loved the Alcott stories.

Kitty Pryde
10-04-2009, 04:44 AM
I have maybe 100 or so of mine. Very most maximum favorites: Zoophabets and Dream Child, both picture books. I have a decent collection of Doctor Seuss, and the Narnia series, Animalia, Abel's Island, The Big Book of Peace, some good nonfiction books about animals, and a bunch of MG novels.

benbradley
10-04-2009, 05:13 AM
I do recall having my very own actual "Green Eggs and Ham" and maybe one or two other Dr. Zeuss books, but I'm not sure if they were bought new for me or hand-me-downs (my brother was two years older than me). Regardless, things like books and my tricycle often "disappeared" with no warning, apparently when my parents thought I was "too old" for them or something, and yes, the trike disappeared many years before I learned to ride a bicycle, which was always a hand-me-down. (cut/paste to memoir)

But most of the books I read were from the library, such as "Rivets and Sprockets" which I remember very well, as it was the most interesting book I had read up to that time. And the library doesn't have these anymore either. Unlike some other of Alexander Key's books, his robot books went out of print, and I suppose I'm not the only one who wants to relive his childhood. Online I see a copy as low as $62.

I did find "Sprocket: A Little Robot" at a thrift store, and it was a little odd to read the "first in the series" 40+ years after having read the sequel "Rivets and Sprockets," and all this time I never knew it was a sequel.

I also read Heinlein's "The Rolling Stones" (which was for some strange reason renamed "The Family Stone" or some crap) back then, and I wanted to read more of those, but that was the only one of his I found in the children's section. It was interesting reading it in my '20's - I was past page 20 before I realized I had read it before.

There is one I don't have that tears me up every time I think about it. :(
Do you miss having The One you had, or would another copy of the same book do? These things are Always Available for a price.

I've once or twice thought I'd like to have a copy of every book I've ever read, but that might be impractical. I've got too many now, including some I haven't even read yet.

sheadakota
10-04-2009, 05:35 AM
My favorite book as a kid was Cannon Ball Simp about an ugly little black dog abandoned in a junk yard-Tell me I'm not the only one who read it.

Pat~
10-04-2009, 05:37 AM
I have my childhood copy of The Secret Garden, given to me by my uncle (illustrated by Tasha Tudor); my husband has his 1950s copies of the Winnie the Pooh clothbound 4-book set as well. My folks, sadly, sold most of our kid stuff in a garage sale while I was in college (prior to their cross-country move).

My earliest favorite (and long lost) book was a 13" tall Rand McNally Giant Book (1958) entitled Little Ballerina. When hubby and I moved to our present home 11 years ago, I found the identical picture book in our town's resale shop...and bought it. ;)

JoNightshade
10-04-2009, 06:01 AM
I have a bunch of picturebooks - favorites are The Velveteen Rabbit and A Garden of Verses. I also have the entire collection of those big old blue illustrated bible story books... I remember I used to see lots of those in waiting rooms of Dr.s and Dentists. Anyone remember those? I also have several odd treasuries I inherited from my much older sister... some of them seem to be readers from when she was in gradeschool. From her I also got a collection of Disney storybooks - which all have crayon on them, thanks to her, not me!!! :)

I have almost no chapter books for children, such as Anne of Green Gables (which I was given and promptly got rid of, TYVM) or Little House on the Prairie or whatnot. I read all of those types of books at the library... and let us just say that my taste was not "traditional." Now, as an adult, I keep my eyes open for old hardback copies of the Three Investigator series, which I particularly loved. Interestingly, I can still remember not just the titles and covers of my favorite books, but exactly where they were located on the library shelves. I wonder if they're still there?

I also have a large collection of adult books that my mother read to me as a child. Stuff by Jack London, James Herriot, and various adventure stories. We read a lot of survival tales, about people living in extreme environments and getting stuck in awful places. Many of those came from my grandfather, who read that sort of thing himself. We also read a LOT of real-life animal stories. I've kept all of those books I could get my hands on, and I am SOOO looking forward to revisiting them with my son!!!

In addition to nightly family time at the dinner table (in which everyone "told a story" about their day), I consider daily reading time with my mother one of the major elements of my life that influenced me not just as a writer, but as a person who truly loves and pursues knowledge. It was our "special time" together and was constant well after I had learned to read for myself. Probably preaching to the choir here, but... READ TO YOUR KIDS!!!

Xelebes
10-04-2009, 06:56 AM
Most of my childhood books were shared with my siblings or were borrowed from the library. The books that I did accrue through birthdays and stuff, about half of them I kept and the others are in boxes somewhere.

bylinebree
10-04-2009, 11:34 AM
How does what we read then inform what we read and write now? The books I enjoyed as a child seem a little on the dark or alternative side, I sought that then and now, it appears.

So did, and do, I! (sought certain things then and still do) Isn't that weird, how what we love as children seems to be a part of how we are "wired" or created?

I think it's cool how the Creator put very specific things inside each of us--things that speak to our very souls.
I loved fantasy as a child (tho' I had no idea it was called that!) and have returned to it.

Seems like we come full circle at some pt. in life. Maybe because children are very much in sync with their "true selves" or such? And we may lose touch with it.

"Back to your first love" --indeed.

emilycross
10-04-2009, 03:02 PM
We still have all the ladybird books that helped us to learn to read in our house (someplace packed away) - most of my other childhood books were borrowed from the library so i never owned them. I had older brothers so i never read (or heard of, till friends mentiond) nancy drew - only the famous five, secret seven and the three investigators for me :D

I still have my little princess, secret garden and call of the wild around though, which were presents i got from bookpeople

Rose English
10-04-2009, 11:09 PM
Thank you so much to everyone who took time away from their writing to share their thoughts. I love this forum.


There is one I don't have that tears me up every time I think about it. :(

Like ben said, I suppose you could find a copy of it somewhere, eBay perhaps? Last night I spent too long wishfully adding second-hand books to my Amazon cart. I shall probably delete them, but I like to go virtual book shopping.


I did find "Sprocket: A Little Robot" at a thrift store, and it was a little odd to read the "first in the series" 40+ years after having read the sequel "Rivets and Sprockets," and all this time I never knew it was a sequel.

In my OP I described a book I thought I'd read. Well, I think it actually might have been one short story called The Shadow Cage by Philippa Pearce. The title just suddenly came to me out of the blue. I googled it, got the author's name and discovered it was published in a collection. All this time I thought it was one long scary book, read over the course of days. It made quite an impression. Or maybe I've blanked out the other stories.


I also have a large collection of adult books that my mother read to me as a child.

Whereas I read my mother's books, some of which I realise now were completely inappropriate. But - informative.

Missed this yesterday, and had to add


...Bazooka Joe bubble gum...

Jaw cramps in a wrapper.


Seems like we come full circle at some pt. in life. Maybe because children are very much in sync with their "true selves" or such? And we may lose touch with it.

"Back to your first love" --indeed.

Yes! I think all of my writing this year has been about finding my voice, and stamping on the inner critic. Learning the craft is so important, and I truly think that, but for where I am and why I want to write, it's secondary. What's the point of polishing something that isn't 'me' in the first place? And how do I know what's part of 'me' unless I go back to the beginning?

Anyway, as ever my friends you give me much to think about. I discover what I want to write about by writing about it. (I didn't say this. I'm paraphrasing somebody like Alain de Botton quoting Proust. I think.)

Thank you again :Hug2:.

jodiodi
10-05-2009, 12:04 AM
I used to have tons of books, but after I grew up and moved out, my mother tossed them in the library donation bin or threw them away.

I had the entire Trixie Belden series
To Dance, To Dream little biographies of dancers
Alice in Wonderland & Through the Lookinglass
The Wizard of Oz

I read Mama & Grandma's Gothic mystery/romance books, the entire Agatha Christie collection, and went to the library every Saturday to get books. I can't remember all the books I read.

brainstorm77
10-05-2009, 12:39 AM
No, they got musty from storage and ended up getting tossed.

MGraybosch
10-06-2009, 05:23 AM
Most of my childhood books were from the library.

That's how it was for me. I didn't start collecting books of my own until I was a teenager. I still have my Plume illustrated paperback edition of The Gunslinger; it was the first book I ever bought, and I redeemed fifteen dollars worth of bottles and cans to buy it and a couple of Blue Oyster Cult tapes.

Besides, I suspect that C.S. Lewis' Narnia novels were the youngest stuff I read as a kid. I preferred Stephen King, Michael Moorcock, and Fritz Leiber to anything on the YA racks, and I avoided anything that had won a Newberry Medal or a Caldecott.

joyce
10-06-2009, 05:39 AM
I used to love it in elementary school when the teacher would pass out the form where you could order books. My mom hated it because I was always making her buy me a couple. My favorite was "Flip", about a colt who dreamed he could fly. I forced my kid to get it in first grade. I still love it.

StancyMcKatt
10-06-2009, 05:57 AM
I still have my favorite books from when I was young. About 3ft of a shelf out in our hallway/library full of them. I've managed to get copies of my favorites from when I was a teenager. They where all books that I'd originally checked out from the library.

C.bronco
10-06-2009, 06:00 AM
The ones I didn't save, my Mom did. She gave me a stack of them last year, and made me happy happy.
:)
Long lost friends.

ChristineR
10-06-2009, 07:46 AM
Marianne Dreams by Catherine Storr. Aka. Paperhouse. Was made into a movie.

fringle
10-06-2009, 10:44 AM
Sadly, no. Most of my books were borrowed from the Bookmobile. I loved the Bookmobile. I kept the schedule up on the refrigerator and I would plan out in advance what books I was going to check out.

Phaeal
10-06-2009, 05:56 PM
The only one I have left is my battered Little Women. My mother tried to give this away once, when I was around fifteen. The horror on my face shocked her out of THAT idea.

The books I wish hadn't disappeared: My beloved Bomba the Jungle Boy pulps. Bomba and I spent many a summer afternoon combatting fer-de-lances, anacondas, caimans, and headhunters. Sweet.

RickN
10-06-2009, 06:55 PM
I kept several (Hardy Boys, Three Investigators, etc) and my kids read them. Now they're off in college so wifey and I are culling the herd to see what the kids want to keep and what we want to tuck away for our eventual grandchildren.

The rest I'll donate to the Home for Wayward Strippers that I do volunteer work for, several hours a day, seven days a week.

Tara Stone
10-24-2009, 09:16 PM
I went through mine a couple of years ago and kept all my favorites.

Cliff Face
10-25-2009, 06:55 AM
I had a few books when I was young (like, 5-7 YO) that have all been donated now. Then I found a series that was being sold in Newsagencies - not exactly a novel series, but more like a magazine of a saga, with pictures and collector cards that had a few games you could play (and I made up my fair share of other games to play with those cards...).

It was called The Ancestral Trail. 26 books per year, for 2 years. First year was Fantasy, second year was Sci-Fi. Absolutely brilliant. Found it when I was about 8, and I still have all of them. Re-read the fantasy ones a couple years back - still had me enthralled.

You could buy a special packing case for them, which was basically just a decorated carboard box in the shape of the magazines, that could hold a year's worth of them. Didn't get the second year box. Sadly, one day when a friend was over my house, he stepped on the box and it broke down the front. I still have it, though, as it wasn't completely trashed. I loved that series and when my friend stepped on the box I cried, and mum had to explain that he didn't do it on purpose. I still didn't speak to him for a week.

Don't remember many other books until I was a teenager, at which point I bought the Tolkien books. Lost them moving house, sadly, so I don't have them any more. I used to spend 4 hours a night reading LotR after school, during the homework-heavy end of high school. Loved those books. Going to buy them again when I have spare cash (I've exhausted my bookstore's supply of new books I want... nearly... well, okay, so there's still loads more I want that I've never read before which thus rank a bit higher than LotR for what to spend my dwindling resources on...).

Most of the books I read between the ages of 9 and 15 were library or school books, so I don't have them anymore, and can't remember most of them.

I think when I get my own home built, I'm going to have extra wide hallways, so I can put bookcases along the hallways. Otherwise I'll eventually run out of room for books if I rely on putting them in the study, considering I'll need a computer desk, a writing supplies unit, and a writer's desk...

[/ramble]

Rose English
10-25-2009, 10:59 PM
The following secondhand hardbacks now sit on top of my 'to be read' pile:

Roald Dahl's "The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar and Six More".
Walter Farley's "The Black Stallion".
Catherine Storr's "Marianne Dreams".

I feel like I should also have plasters on my knees and a white paper bag of cola cubes/aniseed twists...

The Lonely One
10-25-2009, 11:04 PM
I often re-buy them, which I like too because they're in good condition from the store.

Just bought "The Phantom Tollbooth."

My uncle bought me "The Little Prince" when I was young, as a gift, and I was disappointed. "A book?" Man, how times have changed. I still have the copy, for one, and I love it.

Ken
10-25-2009, 11:08 PM
... used books are cool. They also have splotches of food on the pages, which can be tossed into a pot and made into a meal :-P

HelloKiddo
10-26-2009, 03:04 AM
I would stay up all night to finish a book, never mind about school in the morning. Why? What could be so absorbing about the plot in a childs book?

I was the same way (I'm not as much now). I wonder if it's just something about childhood that makes us so absorbed in books that we can't wait until morning to know the end?

In answer to the question, I agree with Miss Kriss on this one. Most of the books I read back then will stay where I feel they belong--as happy childhood memories. I'm sure if I read many of them now I'd be bothered by the horrible writing and silly storylines. Why spoil it? Just keep the pleasant memories and leave the past in the past.

Freelancer
10-26-2009, 03:07 AM
Yup. I kept many of them and I also made mp3 from my childhood audio cassettes. :)

chevbrock
10-27-2009, 08:35 AM
I have most of my chapbooks, still. Some of them I won as prizes at school, others were christmas presents (forget birthdays, my birthday is too close to christmas). I have almost a whole shelf full of horse reference books that was given to me for Christmas one year, and I was in heaven!

Titles? All sorts of things: "The Girl with Spunk", "Requiem for a princess", "The Bay Whalers", "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" and heaps of horsey stories, of course!

ThePinkBookworm
10-28-2009, 06:34 AM
Most definitely, all of them. I hope to have my children read them someday, and besides, my mom would never get rid of them anyway.

:e2writer: