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View Full Version : Oxford dictionary's new entries. What do you think?



The Lonely One
09-29-2009, 07:31 PM
Check out an article about it here:

http://www.good.is/post/the-worlds-biggest-word-book-grows-again/?GT1=48001

Waddaya think?

maestrowork
09-29-2009, 08:36 PM
English is a living, growing, breathing language. I think it's a good thing.

Except for the word "bling."

AnonymousWriter
09-29-2009, 09:28 PM
I agree. It's good to see it growing.

But "bling" isn't that bad a word...is it?

Phaeal
09-29-2009, 10:04 PM
Bling has a nice ring to it. Hell, sometimes it even IS a ring!

maestrowork
09-29-2009, 10:48 PM
LOL, Id twitter abt bling bling 2nite, kthxbai.

swvaughn
09-29-2009, 11:09 PM
Hooray for anyhoo! :D

Ellefire
09-29-2009, 11:41 PM
Bah, it doesn't seem to have my favourite word in there: fratching (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/fratching)

Ken
09-30-2009, 12:39 AM
... since my own view runs counter to everybody else's I'll refrain from comment and pretend to enthusiastically embrace the update as well: hoot, hoot. how terrific. i am soooooo happy about this !

Medievalist
09-30-2009, 12:56 AM
Ye knowe ek, that in forme of speche is chaunge
Withinne a thousand yere, and wordes tho
That hadden pris, now wonder nyce and straunge
Us thinketh hem, and yit they spake hem so.
-- Chaucer Troilus and Criseyde Book II ll. 22-25--

talkwrite
09-30-2009, 03:38 AM
Most people have the choice whether to use these terms or not. In my profession I am obligated to come up with a verbatim and accurate translation for them simultaneously - under oath!
If people express themselves this way I have to add them to my own translation vocabulary.

Medievalist
09-30-2009, 04:34 AM
Keep in mind that the purpose of the OED is to document the language as we use it; it is descriptive, not prescriptive. The inclusion of words in the OED merely means that the words are used frequently enough, in a wide enough context, they they can be documented.

There are easily seven or eight thousand words that were only used before 1600--but they are still documented.

Wayne K
09-30-2009, 04:40 AM
Is Asshat in it?

Wayne K
09-30-2009, 04:41 AM
Douchebaggery?

Wayne K
09-30-2009, 04:45 AM
One of the things I like about hanging out with black people is the way they play with language. Ebonics is a lot of fun, and why not throw some of it into the dictionary? OED isn't forcing people to use it.

ideagirl
09-30-2009, 06:39 PM
Ye knowe ek, that in forme of speche is chaunge
Withinne a thousand yere, and wordes tho
That hadden pris, now wonder nyce and straunge
Us thinketh hem, and yit they spake hem so.
-- Chaucer Troilus and Criseyde Book II ll. 22-25--

Word! Chaucer's da man!

ideagirl
09-30-2009, 06:41 PM
Is Asshat in it?

In a similar vein, how about "buttloads"? As in, "they got buttloads of money"?

I am REALLY not sure where that word came from... Or how it came to mean "a very large amount," being as how the typical butt is not capable of carrying particularly large loads of anything.