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Tepelus
09-28-2009, 05:27 AM
I just need a simple translation, if any of you know Latin,

"You will be mine."

Tis all, and thank you.

mscelina
09-28-2009, 05:34 AM
Vos eras mei.

Formally. Would you prefer the vulgar form?

DeborahM
09-28-2009, 05:36 AM
http://www.translation-guide.com/free_online_translators.php?from=English&to=Latin

vos ero mei

Tepelus
09-28-2009, 05:36 AM
I think the formal would be just fine, unless you'd think it would be too stiff for a vampire to say (stiff, vampire, ha ha ha!). She's an old vampire, so I think the formal would work.

Tepelus
09-28-2009, 05:38 AM
I don't like those online translators, for the fact that they translate word for word, instead of how it should really be spoken in any language.

mscelina
09-28-2009, 05:41 AM
ero is first person singular, future tense--I will be.

eras is second person signular, future tense--you will be.

Translators don't really get into the meat of the Latin language.

Tepelus
09-28-2009, 05:48 AM
Thanks mscelina!

mscelina
09-28-2009, 05:51 AM
Mea iucundita.

Smiling Ted
09-28-2009, 05:55 AM
Well gang, as long as we're doing translations-

Can anyone give me an English to Latin of "This sword is a big pain"?
How about "This sword is a big pain in the butt"?

Seriously.

mscelina
09-28-2009, 05:58 AM
*scowls*

Surely you're not serious.

Gladius poena magna glutteum est.

Smiling Ted
09-28-2009, 06:01 AM
I *am* serious.
And stop calling me "surely."

Thank you.

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 07:11 AM
(although it's been a few decades and you didn't specify the type of sword)
ipse gladius dolor in clune est (If the sword is actually in his butt)
hic gladius dolor in clune est (If he is commenting about a sword within reach that is not in his butt)

StephanieFox
09-28-2009, 08:15 AM
I read that once when someone was doing typeface greeking. So that's what that means.

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 12:37 PM
Vos eras mei.

Formally. Would you prefer the vulgar form?

Vos is plural. Why would you use the singular eras with the plural vos?

Eras is imperfect tense, not future. Eras means you were being, not you will be.

If you want to say, you will be mine, to a single person, you would use eris, or to more than one person, eristis.

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 12:43 PM
I just need a simple translation, if any of you know Latin,

"You will be mine."

Tis all, and thank you.

Eris mihi would be a nice way of saying it, if addressed to a single person.

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 12:50 PM
http://www.translation-guide.com/free_online_translators.php?from=English&to=Latin

vos ero mei

This literally translates to "you (plural) I (singular) will be mine.

It literally doesn't make sense. Do not trust an online translator.

underthecity
09-28-2009, 04:23 PM
As long as you're offering Latin translations,

I have a couple of phrases for my novel I've always would have liked to know the Latin for, if you wouldn't mind:

To Bring Out the Dead

Calling a specter made possible with electricity

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 04:35 PM
As long as you're offering Latin translations,

I have a couple of phrases for my novel I've always would have liked to know the Latin for, if you wouldn't mind:

To Bring Out the Dead

Efferre infera is one possibility.


Calling a specter made possible with electricity

The best I can do at the moment for this one is cum electricae impigritate fieri potest idolon vocare.

With electric energy it is made possible to call a spectre.

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 04:59 PM
(although it's been a few decades and you didn't specify the type of sword)
ipse gladius dolor in clune est (If the sword is actually in his butt)
hic gladius dolor in clune est (If he is commenting about a sword within reach that is not in his butt)
:roll: I like it.

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 05:23 PM
As long as you're offering Latin translations,

I have a couple of phrases for my novel I've always would have liked to know the Latin for, if you wouldn't mind:

To Bring Out the Dead

Calling a specter made possible with electricity

Latin is very nuanced. You are asking us to translate sentence fragments. Don't blame us when the translations turn out to be a bit off. We need complete sentences and some context.

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 05:34 PM
:roll: I like it.

and of course the first joke in Latin that all students learn...
semper ubi sub ubi

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 05:38 PM
and of course the first joke in Latin that all students learn...
semper ubi sub ubi

Puteo ergo sum.

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 06:00 PM
Puteo ergo sum.

I like it

underthecity
09-28-2009, 06:01 PM
Latin is very nuanced. You are asking us to translate sentence fragments. Don't blame us when the translations turn out to be a bit off. We need complete sentences and some context.

Sorry, "to Bring Out the Dead" is the title of a very old (and ficticious) book.


"Calling a specter made possible with electricity" is a caption under an illustration in the above book.

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 06:07 PM
te possidebo (I think that looks right)
I will own you

I'm guessing at your English of "You will be mine" that the witch is saying in context that "you" will become a possession of the witch, not to be confused with being possessed by the witch in some religious or demonic sense

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 06:12 PM
Sorry, "to Bring Out the Dead" is the title of a very old (and ficticious) book.

arcessens manes
summoning the spirits of the dead





"Calling a specter made possible with electricity" is a caption under an illustration in the above book.

working on it

question: Is the specter a ghost of a formerly living person, or a spirit that never had a body? Is it friendly or an enemy?

underthecity
09-28-2009, 06:21 PM
In the context of "To Bring Out the Dead," the specter is the ghost of a formerly living person.

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 06:22 PM
arcessens manes
summoning the spirits of the dead


:rant: Bloody hell! Why didn't I think of using a present participle? :rant:

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 06:33 PM
:rant: Bloody hell! Why didn't I think of using a present participle? :rant:

because you were transliterating, instead of translating. Be patient grasshopper. When you start dreaming in Latin you will know that you are almost there; that or the men in the white coats are almost there :)

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 06:37 PM
because you were transliterating, instead of translating.

Yes, you're absolutely right. Gratias tibi do.

If reality would get into the narrative swing of things, there would the pinging sound of a penny dropping about now.



Be patient grasshopper. When you start dreaming in Latin you will know that you are almost there; that or the men in the white coats are almost there :)

I have a while to go before I get to that stage. Funny you should say that about the white coats. I'm a psychiatric nurse and I've just been giving someone info on another thread, about psychiatric nursing.

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 06:37 PM
Summoning a ghost by means of electricity

arcessens umbra de electrica

Does that look right Rufus? Like I said it's been a few decades.

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 07:03 PM
Summoning a ghost by means of electricity

arcessens umbra de electrica

Does that look right Rufus? Like I said it's been a few decades.

It just occurs to me, that using the ablative of means, means that you don't use a preposition.

Therefore, with electricity in the sense of electricity being the means by which you summon, simply requires electricitate. So, we could simply have, Arcessens umbra electricitate, and I think that works nicely.

Here's a really good link if you need words that aren't in your dictionary.

http://www.archives.nd.edu/cgi-bin/wordes.exe

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 07:37 PM
It just occurs to me, that using the ablative of means, means that you don't use a preposition.

Therefore, with electricity in the sense of electricity being the means by which you summon, simply requires electricitate. So, we could simply have, Arcessens umbra electricitate, and I think that works nicely.


electrica (first declension feminine) is listed as the translation for electricity in my 1966 Traupman "Latin dictionary". I also still have some of my old grammar books.

As a college and grad student in Latin, I couldn't afford the giant dictionary so I kept checking it out of the library. My little one is only about the size of a small phone book.

electricitate as a word form doesn't appear. (which might have to do with a smaller dictionary)As I remember that word form would have to be an ablative absolute of a verb which could only be "to electrify" and why it appears with a third declension ablative ending instead of the first feminine doesn't make sense to me. Therefore as I understand it

Arcessens umbra electricitate: would translate to "calling forth a ghost having been electrified" as opposed to "Calling forth a ghost by means of electricity". I think you are right about not needing "de", in which case I arrive at
Arcessens umbra electrica

Assentiesne?

mscelina
09-28-2009, 07:49 PM
Ack. That's what I get for trying to translate off the top of my head late at night.

Memnon624
09-28-2009, 08:21 PM
Any of you Latinistas care to take a swing at a longer snippet? A page from the Latin version of William of Tyre's "A History of Deeds Done Beyond the Sea"? If you're interested, I can either post it here or PM it to you . . .

Thanks!

Scott

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 08:27 PM
Any of you Latinistas care to take a swing at a longer snippet? A page from the Latin version of William of Tyre's "A History of Deeds Done Beyond the Sea"? If you're interested, I can either post it here or PM it to you . . .

Thanks!

Scott

Post it: I'm rusty enough I might easily screw it up and can't guarantee that I'll have the energy. More brains are probably better than a few. It might be fun. Have you looked it up in the Loeb Collection? If you are near a university with a Latin or Classics department they might already have it. I don't have access to it anymore.

Memnon624
09-28-2009, 08:31 PM
All right . . . here you go :)


CAPUT XVII. Mittuntur ad calipham qui foedus innovent; et describitur regiae domus magnificentia.

Et quoniam singularem, et saeculis nostris incognitam habet illa principis domus consuetudinem, libet diligenter adnotare, quae fida relatione eorum qui ad illum tantum principem sunt ingressi, de statu et magnificentia, et immensitate divitiarum, et gloriae multiplicitate, comperimus; non enim erit minimum profecisse, haec intellexisse diligentius. Praedictus ergo Hugo Caesariensis, et cum eo Gaufridus Fulcherii frater militiae Templi, in principio obeundae legationis, ducente soldano, Cahere ingressi, ad palatium, quod lingua eorum Cascere dicitur, ascendentes cum apparitorum numerositate maxima, qui cum gladiis et strepitu praecedebant, per angiportus, et loca luminibus egent a ducti, ad singulos introitus armatorum Aethiopum cohortes crebrae salutationis officium certatim soldano exhibentes, repererunt. Transeuntes autem primam et secundam custodiam ad quaedam diffusa et magis spatiosa loca, soli pervia et divo exposita, intromissi, deambulatoria inveniunt, columnis subnixa marmoreis, auratis laquearibus et prominentibus celata operibus, pavimento strata vario, ita ut omni suo ambitu, regiam praetenderent dignitatem; quibus tanta inerat materiae et operis elegantia, ut transeuntium etiam invitos detinerent oculos, et quadam videndi aviditate, invitante operum eximia novitate, intuentium aspectus non sinerent satiari. Erant ibi piscinae marmoreae, aquis redundantes limpidioribus; erant avium multimodarum, quas noster non novit orbis, varii garritus, formae incognitae et coloris peregrini, figurarum quantum ad nos prodigiosarum, cuique gustus juxta speciem suam, et edulium cuique varietati eorum consentaneum. Inde ad ulteriora, praeviis eunuchorum principibus, admissi, iterum aedificia tanto prioribus elegantiora inveniunt, quanto quae prius viderant vulgaribus et usitatis praestantiora videbantur. Hic quadrupedum stupenda varietas, qualem pictorum solet manus lasciva depingere; qualem solet poetica licentia mentiri, aut somniantis animus visionibus imaginari nocturnis: qualem orientis, et austri solent dioeceses ministrare; occidens autem videre nunquam, audire vero rarius consuevit. Videbatur procul dubio, quod ex iis locis, Solinus noster Polystoris sui deduxerit historiam.

CAPUT XVIII. Complentur pacta; et in eorum confirmationem calipha dexteram dat Hugoni Caesariensi.

Et jam per multos anfractus et varia diverticula, quae etiam negotiosos poterant sui contemplatione detinere, ventum est ad ipsam regiam, ubi majores armatorum cunei, satellitum quoque stipatus numerosior, habitu et frequentia domini gloriam incomparabilem fatebantur; ipsa quoque locorum facies domini opulentiam, et supereminentes divitias praetendebant. Ingressis porro eis et in interiorem partem palatii admissis, soldanus de more consuetam domino exhibens reverentiam, semel et secundo humi prostratus, quasi nemini debitum cultum, et quoddam adorationis genus coepit supplex impendere; tertio iterum prostratus ad terram, gladium quem de collo gerebat suspensum, deposuit. Et ecce subito contractis mira velocitate velariis, margaritarum varietate auroque contextis, quae media dependebant, et obumbrant solium, revelata facie, throno sedens aureo, habitu plus quam regio, paucis circa eum de domesticis et familiaribus eunuchis, apparuit calipha. Tunc accedens cum omni reverentia soldanus, sedentis pedibus osculum humiliter imprimens, adventus legatorum causam et tenorem pactorum, regni etiam urgentissimam necessitatem, hostes immanissimos in mediis astare visceribus; quid etiam ab eo exigatur, quidve ei a domino rege impendatur, sub verborum compendio aperit. Ad haec ille benigne multum et placida tranquilli vultus hilaritate respondit: se juxta initas et utrinque admissas conventiones, dilecto suo domino regi, larga interpretatione cuncta adimplere paratum esse. Petentibus nostris, ut haec propria manu firmaret, sicut dominus rex fecerat; prima facie visi sunt, qui ei familiarius astabant, auriculares et cubicularii, penes quos consiliorum regiorum erat auctoritas, rem nimis tanquam in saeculis inauditam, abhorrere; tandem vero, post multam deliberationem, et soldani diligentem instantiam, manum porrigit, invitus nimium, sed velatam; cui praedictus Hugo de Caesarea, multum admirantibus et stupentibus Aegyptiis, quod tam libere summo principi loqueretur, dixit: Domine, fides angulos non habet; sed in fide media, per quam se solent obligare principes, omnia debent esse nuda; et aperta cum sinceritate et colligari, et solvi convenit universa, quae fidei interpositione, pactis quibuslibet inseruntur. Propterea aut nudam dabis, aut fictum aliquid, et minus puritatis habens, ex parte tua cogemur opinari. Tunc demum invitus plurimum, et quasi majestati detrahens, subridens tamen, quod multum aegre tulerunt Aegyptii, dexteram suam in manum domini Hugonis nudam praebuit, eumdem Hugonem, pactorum formam determinantem, eisdem pene syllabis sequens tenorem conventorum bona fide, sine fraude et malo ingenio se observaturum contestans. Erat autem, sicut dominus Hugo nobis retulit, juvenis prima pubescens lanugine, fuscus, procerus corpore, facie venusta, liberalis plurimum, innumeras habens uxores; nomen ejus Elhadech, filius Elfeis. Quibus dimissis, regiae liberalitatis insigne, munera legatis dirigit, quae tantum principem sua quantitate et specie commendarent; ut a facie tanti principis jucundum haberent egressum et ad suos remitteret laetiores.

ETA: I know essentially what it's supposed to say based on commentary I've read from other authors, but I need an English translation for an essay I'm working on.

Thanks, again!

Scott

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 08:43 PM
electrica (first declension feminine) is listed as the translation for electricity in my 1966 Traupman "Latin dictionary". I also still have some of my old grammar books.

As a college and grad student in Latin, I couldn't afford the giant dictionary so I kept checking it out of the library. My little one is only about the size of a small phone book.

electricitate as a word form doesn't appear. (which might have to do with a smaller dictionary)As I remember that word form would have to be an ablative absolute of a verb which could only be "to electrify" and why it appears with a third declension ablative ending instead of the first feminine doesn't make sense to me. Therefore as I understand it

Arcessens umbra electricitate: would translate to "calling forth a ghost having been electrified" as opposed to "Calling forth a ghost by means of electricity". I think you are right about not needing "de", in which case I arrive at
Arcessens umbra electrica

Assentiesne?

Ago sed caute.

The online dictionary I gave the link for does suggest electricitas as the noun (3rd declension and neuter).

So if we assume that this online dictionary is correct, and use the ablative of means (which doesn't require a preposition), then the ablative form of electricitas is electricitate.

NOMINATIVE - electricitas
GENITIVE - electricitatis
DATIVE - electricitati
ACCUSATIVE - electricitatem
ABLATIVE - electricitate

on the other hand, if your dictionary is correct and it's a first declension feminine, electrica. ae. then the ablative form would in fact be electrica with the long 'a'.

So, you could well be correct here.

The same website gives electrifico, electrificare, electrificavi, electrificatus as a first conjugation verb for electrify.

I imagine that summoning the electrified ghost would be arcessens umbra electrificata.

This of course requires that we believe the online dictionary rather than yours.

Felix assentire sum.

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 08:45 PM
Ack. That's what I get for trying to translate off the top of my head late at night.



Been there, done that, kicked myself too. :ROFL:

Rufus Coppertop
09-28-2009, 08:48 PM
Post it: I'm rusty enough I might easily screw it up and can't guarantee that I'll have the energy. More brains are probably better than a few. It might be fun. Have you looked it up in the Loeb Collection? If you are near a university with a Latin or Classics department they might already have it. I don't have access to it anymore.

Lawks! You're a braver man than I am to volunteer for that lot!

Mittuntur ad calipham qui foedus innovent; et describitur regiae domus magnificentia.

They are sent to the Caliph who would renew the treaty; the magnificence of the palace is described?

Memnon624
09-28-2009, 09:05 PM
Have you looked it up in the Loeb Collection? If you are near a university with a Latin or Classics department they might already have it. I don't have access to it anymore.

It's not in Loeb; in fact, the last English translation was dated 1943 and copies of that volume are suitably expensive. The Internet Medieval Sourcebook has a few selections translated into English, and the whole text in Old French, while the whole text is in Latin at the Crusades Encyclopedia.com. If I remember right, it was originally written in Old French.

Scott

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 09:09 PM
Lawks! You're a braver man than I am to volunteer for that lot!

Mittuntur ad calipham qui foedus innovent; et describitur regiae domus magnificentia.

They are sent to the Caliph who would renew the treaty; the magnificence of the palace is described?

Yeah well he said SHORT SNIPPETT, for a foreign (unknown) exerpt, that section is I believe about the length of my entrance exam for grad school. I guess short is a relative term. That's quite a bit longer than I was expecting.

Regarding the feminine 1st vs the neuter 3rd, the difference might be timing: Classical vs Medieval Latin, in which case we could be both right technically, but if it's a witch today, she'd more likely be using medieval, in which case yours may be more correct.

GeorgeK
09-28-2009, 09:29 PM
Hi Memnon, have you googled "english translation william of tyre" ? It looks like there are translations out there. It would take me a long time to attempt it partly because I was not into medieval Latin, which that is. The differences are comparable to the difference between Chaucer and today for English. So, it's doubtful if you are under the clock that I'd be able to comply in time.

Memnon624
09-28-2009, 10:19 PM
Hey guys, thanks for giving it a look! There are excerpts of it translated into English that are online, but not this particular excerpt (of course). I have what might be a translation of this that was contained in the book The Crusades Through Arab Eyes by Amin Maalouf (though Maalouf doesn't seem to credit the excerpt to William of Tyre), and another possible English version done in the late '20s by Harold Lamb. The only edition I know of is a 1943 edition, and it's long out of print and fetches $70-80 or more from retailers.

That "snippet" is way longer here than it looked in my little Word file . . . :blush:

Scott

Rufus Coppertop
09-29-2009, 02:49 AM
Hey guys, thanks for giving it a look! There are excerpts of it translated into English that are online, but not this particular excerpt (of course). I have what might be a translation of this that was contained in the book The Crusades Through Arab Eyes by Amin Maalouf (though Maalouf doesn't seem to credit the excerpt to William of Tyre), and another possible English version done in the late '20s by Harold Lamb. The only edition I know of is a 1943 edition, and it's long out of print and fetches $70-80 or more from retailers.

That "snippet" is way longer here than it looked in my little Word file . . . :blush:

Scott

I'm doing crusades at uni at the moment. William's Historia and the Gesta Francorum are must haves for the future.

Medievalist
09-29-2009, 03:53 AM
I'm doing crusades at uni at the moment. William's Historia and the Gesta Francorum are must haves for the future.

Go and google for mss. of them. There are exquisite illuminated versions. They are amazing.

Medievalist
09-29-2009, 03:58 AM
All right . . . here you go :)



ETA: I know essentially what it's supposed to say based on commentary I've read from other authors, but I need an English translation for an essay I'm working on.

Thanks, again!

Scott

1. Hie thee to a Middle English version; there are several.

2. Have you tried the Patrilogica Vaticana? It's got just about everything, but poorly indexed. You need to go to the Library and look at the index to the entire set. Many libraries do have the entire collection on CD-ROM.

3. Have you tried looking on the site of Perseus at Tufts?

Memnon624
09-29-2009, 06:08 PM
Thanks, Medievalist!

1. Are any of the Middle English versions online? I've Googled my fingers to the bone and have found none.

2. Searching an online database of libraries in my state have turned up nothing on either the Patrilogica Vaticana or William's Historia. My state sucks.

3. I came up dry at Perseus, too.

If this text is so crucial to the study of the Crusades, why is it not more widely available? I had less trouble finding the memoirs of Usamah ibn Munqidh . . .

Thanks, again!

underthecity
09-29-2009, 06:49 PM
Thank you all so much for the translations. But . . . which one do I use?

Threre's this one:


(To Bring Out the Dead) Efferre infera is one possibility.


cum electricae impigritate fieri potest idolon vocare.

With electric energy it is made possible to call a spectre.

That translation works pretty well.



arcessens manes
summoning the spirits of the dead
Which is pretty accurate for "To Bring Out the Dead." The book in question is kind of a manual (written circa 1890 on different ways to summon spirits)



Summoning a ghost by means of electricity

arcessens umbra de electrica
Also works.



. . with electricity in the sense of electricity being the means by which you summon, simply requires electricitate. So, we could simply have, Arcessens umbra electricitate


Is this still accurate, given the later discussion of "electricitate:"




electricitate as a word form doesn't appear. (which might have to do with a smaller dictionary)As I remember that word form would have to be an ablative absolute of a verb which could only be "to electrify" and why it appears with a third declension ablative ending instead of the first feminine doesn't make sense to me. Therefore as I understand it

Arcessens umbra electricitate: would translate to "calling forth a ghost having been electrified" as opposed to "Calling forth a ghost by means of electricity". I think you are right about not needing "de", in which case I arrive at
Arcessens umbra electrica
This, then?




I imagine that summoning the electrified ghost would be arcessens umbra electrificata.
Of course, the ghost, I suppose, has become electrified, but not in the sense of the procedure. The idea, in the book, is that electricity is used to summon the ghost. More specifically, an electrical device.

Rufus Coppertop
09-30-2009, 07:25 AM
Thank you all so much for the translations. But . . . which one do I use?

Is this still accurate, given the later discussion of "electricitate:"

To tell you the truth, I'm not sure. According to George's dictionary, dating back to the seventies, I think he said, electrica (gen. electricae) is the first declension noun for electricity.

According to the online dictionary reachable via the link I posted somewhere above, electricitas (gen. electricitatis) is the noun for electricity and it's a third declension job.

According to the ecclesiastical Latin dictionary I have which was published in the mid-nineties, we have an adjective for electric which is electricus. a. um.

What that means is, it's a first & second declension adjective with three possible sets of endings according to gender.

When coupled with a masculine noun, it takes the 'us' ending, thus electricus. When coupled with a feminine noun, it becomes electrica which makes it look exactly like a first declension noun. In the neuter of course, it becomes electricum.

Personally, if I were to use the phrase you're using in a book, I'd go with the online dictionary's third declension offering and use electricitate but that doesn't mean I think George is wrong.

electricitate is the ablative form and so suggests means and accompaniment.

I'm back at uni on Monday and I'll have a look in the O.L.D. and the Lewis & Short as well and see what I can find.

Incidentally, I was definitely mistaken above when I suggested cum electrico impigratate as meaning with electric energy.

The preposition cum is used to imply accompaniment rather than means.

Veni Romam equo meo means"I came to Rome with (by means of) my horse". In other words, I came to Rome riding my horse.

Veni Romam cum equo meo means "I came to Rome with my horse" but it was coming along for fun and keeping me company, I wasn't necessarily riding it.

I hope this helps.



Of course, the ghost, I suppose, has become electrified, but not in the sense of the procedure. The idea, in the book, is that electricity is used to summon the ghost. More specifically, an electrical device.

Are you writing steampunk? My own WIP has electricity being used for occult purposes.

GeorgeK
09-30-2009, 08:19 AM
Hi Underthecity,

We'll have to wait for Rufus to check the big bad boy of Latin Lexicons (The thing is so big it could be a murder weapon assuming you had some Wiley Coyote contraption from Acme Co. to lift it). My guess right now in terms which version to use is going to depend upon your story. I think my translation is right for Classical Latin and probably his is correct for Medieval Latin. Languages evolve and over a difference of a thousand years Latin evolved too. So how old is your witch or her source? If she's one millennium then "electricitate", and if two millennia then "electrica".

The other possibility is that the on line source "made up" electricitate, as a Latinized phonetic version of "electricity" after having assumed that the Romans would not have had a word for it, but in fact they did. The references were vague and I don't remember them being so long ago but as I understood it, pottery based batteries were used to electroplate counterfeit currency all the way back to the early Persians. Again, we'll have to wait for Rufus to report back.

Rufus Coppertop
09-30-2009, 08:34 AM
The other possibility is that the on line source "made up" electricitate, as a Latinized phonetic version of "electricity" after having assumed that the Romans would not have had a word for it, but in fact they did.

A definite possibility.



Again, we'll have to wait for Rufus to report back.

That'll be Monday.

I already have the contraption. Funnily enough, as soon as I posted the order to Acme, the truck pulled up and delivered it. The problem I have now, this bloody thing tearing about the place going meep meep.

GeorgeK
09-30-2009, 08:46 AM
That'll be Monday.

I already have the contraption. Funnily enough, as soon as I posted the order to Acme, the truck pulled up and delivered it. The problem I have now, this bloody thing tearing about the place going meep meep.

Perhaps if you mixed equal parts of steel BB's and bird feed and ordered a large magnet...

underthecity
09-30-2009, 03:33 PM
Thank you for the extra effort. I'll write in the translation for "To Bring Out the Dead" and wait until Monday for the other one.


Are you writing steampunk? My own WIP has electricity being used for occult purposes.

It's not steampunk, it's a horror novel. The MC is developing a machine to catch ghosts. You can read the first two chapters here (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=156241).

Actually, the book is written; I finished it nine months ago. It's now going through a rewrite and overhaul. This Latin thing has always been a little afterthought, just something to give a smidge more credibility in one of the scenes.

Rufus Coppertop
10-07-2009, 12:53 PM
Okay so, I was at Uni today and I went to the library and I found the Latin dictionaries and ........ not one of them had a word for electric or electricity.

They don't have the latest OLD and the Lewis & Short was sadly lacking and the medieval Latin dictionary didn't have it either.

Monash is one of the 50 best uni's on earth and you can't find the Latin word for electricity!

:rant:

Smiling Ted
10-07-2009, 07:31 PM
Okay so, I was at Uni today and I went to the library and I found the Latin dictionaries and ........ not one of them had a word for electric or electricity.

They don't have the latest OLD and the Lewis & Short was sadly lacking and the medieval Latin dictionary didn't have it either.

Monash is one of the 50 best uni's on earth and you can't find the Latin word for electricity!

:rant:

That's because there is none.

Romans would have been familiar with only three forms of electricity - lightning; the charge of electric fish, like those found in the Nile at the time; and the static electricity caused by rubbing amber with fur.

"Electricity" is a Latin neologism, coined around 1600, from words meaning "like amber."

Maybe you should use the Latin word for "lightning" instead. It's "fulmen," I think. Or "fulgur."

GeorgeK
10-08-2009, 02:09 AM
That's because there is none.

Romans would have been familiar with only three forms of electricity - lightning; the charge of electric fish, like those found in the Nile at the time; and the static electricity caused by rubbing amber with fur.

"Electricity" is a Latin neologism, coined around 1600, from words meaning "like amber."

Maybe you should use the Latin word for "lightning" instead. It's "fulmen," I think. Or "fulgur."


Not true. It was punishable by death and a state secret because electroplating could be used to counterfeit coins.

underthecity
10-08-2009, 02:53 AM
I kind of figured that when the Latin language was originally developed, electricity didn't yet exist. However, since Latin was still being taught and used regularly (in schools and churches, etc.) in the late 1800s, that the equivalent of "electricity" was somehow being used.

Lightning isn't quite accurate, though. I suppose I could make the passage in German or some other language instead. But Latin just seemed so fitting for this particular thing.