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Rowan
09-27-2009, 06:20 PM
Has anyone been the victim of a burglary/break-in while you were at home? What went through your head? How did you react and what did you do? How did it make you feel, etc.?

Anyone else...if you woke up to the sound of breaking glass or a door being kicked in, etc. or just thought an intruder was in your residence --- what goes through [I]your mind and what would you do?

I'm interested in your personal feelings on this and not necessarily what you think you should do, etc.

THANK YOU!!! :)

StephanieFox
09-27-2009, 09:14 PM
Has anyone been the victim of a burglary/break-in while you were at home? What went through your head? How did you react and what did you do? How did it make you feel, etc.?

Anyone else...if you woke up to the sound of breaking glass or a door being kicked in, etc. or just thought an intruder was in your residence --- what goes through [I]your mind and what would you do?

I'm interested in your personal feelings on this and not necessarily what you think you should do, etc.

THANK YOU!!! :)

This happened twice to me over the last 35 years. I came into my house and the door had been kicked in and all my camera equipment and some jewelry had been stolen. I had just gotten a bunch of cameras and lenses from my dad, who wasn't using them anymore. They were beautiful Nikons and there was a telephoto and wide angle lens that I was dying to use but never got the chance.

The schumck also smashed some jewelry boxes and stole some of my jewelry, although it was all costume jewelry (good costume jewelry, thought) and I'm sure the fence he brought it too laughed at him.) It broke my heart a little to loose the camera stuff.

The other time, when I was in college, two young men pushed their way into my apartment and pulled a gun on me and my boyfriend. I got pissed off when they grabbed my flute (I had a flute final the next day.)

I stood up and said, "Give me back my flute!" They had the gun onj my boyfriend but then pointed it at me. That pissed me off even more and I repeated my demand. They didn't give it back. They turned tail and ran down the three flights of stairs and down the street with me after them.

I'm not much of a runner and they got away, but with nothing else. This still pisses me off. Son of a bitch!

By the way, I'm female and 5'2" tall.

Oh, one other time, I was in my half of the duplex in which I lived and sensed that something was off. I opened my door and saw that there were intruders in the apartment below mine. I went back in and called 911, but since we were in the less than good neighborhood, it took about 20 minutes for the cops to show up. I couldn't wait so I went outside to the front walk and waited for the burglers to come out. They saw me and went out the back door instead, but I'd frightened them and they didn't get anything. When the cops finally showed up they told me that I shouldn't have done that, but I certainly wasn't going to cower in my place while my neighbor got robbed.

Maybe I'm not usual.

smcc360
09-27-2009, 10:05 PM
They'll get one chance to surrender, if circumstances allow. Then they'll be stopped.

Summonere
09-27-2009, 10:15 PM
How would - or did - you react (burglary)???

Has anyone been the victim of a burglary/break-in while you were at home? What went through your head? How did you react and what did you do? How did it make you feel, etc.? [I can only imagine how frightening this would be...]

Anyone else...if you woke up to the sound of breaking glass or a door being kicked in, etc. or just thought an intruder was in your residence --- what goes through your mind and what would you do?

I'm interested in your personal feelings on this and not necessarily what you think you should do, etc.

THANK YOU!!!



Yes, yes indeed. What went through my head was a product of curiosity and puzzlement. But in order to understand why, here’s the whole story, or at least as much as I’ll tell…

I was in college, staying at my folk’s house one summer, and while they were overseas, my cousin -- we’ll call her Harriet -- wanted to drop by on her day off from work and make use of the pool. She was in her twenties, blonde, and newly buxomed from the addition of some aftermarket accessories. So I said, okay, sure, come on over. I’ll just be sitting out on the back porch studying.

She came over in her new blue bikini (this is important, by the way), a towel over one shoulder. She had walked, living no more than a block away in the quiet little suburb, and we chitchatted a bit, then she hopped in the pool to float around on an air mattress. I, meanwhile, ventured into the kitchen to slice up a watermelon to snack upon, leaving half the melon and the big carving knife on the kitchen counter (this is important, too, by the way). Outside again, we shared the watermelon. I read a little.

Then the back door opened -- it was one of those sliding glass doors -- and this big fellow was standing there in a pair of shorts and shoes, looking around. I thought that was odd because I didn’t recognize him, but I also fully expected my brother in law to have brought the fellow over, and probably to use the pool, too. In those days, brother in law would often stop by unexpectedly to chat, sometimes bringing a buddy, so my initial reaction was this: well, brother in law -- we’ll call him Skippy -- is probably here, too, and Skippy will probably materialize any moment. That didn’t happen. Instead, this stranger we’ll call Goon, stared at cousin Harriet, who was lounging in the pool and staring back at him through sunglasses.

I asked Goon, “Who are you, and are you here with anyone that I know?” Naturally, I expected that he’d introduce himself and say that he was here with Skippy. Instead, he stared at cousin Harriet.

By then the this-ain’t-right vibe that occurred before he even opened that back door was getting louder. Goon spat a blob of tobacco juice on the back porch. That was devilishly impolite, and not the sort of thing any of Skippy’s friends would do. Clearly Skippy wasn’t here. This guy had showed up all on his own. I put my book down and stood up. Goon looked at me. I asked him, “What are you here for?”

Goon looked at newly buxomed Harriet in her bright blue bikini and said to her, “You know what I’m here for.”

At the time, that made utterly no sense to me. (And if you can’t guess by now, I’ll tell you later.) I told Goon, “I think you’d better leave.”

Goon, a taller, heavier guy than myself, stepped out of the open doorway, off the back step, onto the patio, and toward me. My eyes went to his hands, the waistline of his shorts, his pockets, looking for anything that might indicate a weapon of some sort. Nothing obvious showed, and while that bad vibe was telling me quite clearly that this fellow was here for no good purpose, another part of me was trying to rationalize his presence. He reached up with his right hand toward my left shoulder. I pushed his hand away and told him not to do that. He stepped closer and tried again. I backstepped and said, “Don’t try to touch me.”

Oh but he kept moving toward me. So there’s there a tree nearby, a fruitless Mulberry, as it turns out, and a pretty big one. While he keeps advancing, I tell him five times, “Go away. I’m going to call the police. You should leave before they arrive.” While doing this, I maneuver to not only get the tree between the two of us, but to put myself closer to the still-open back door than he is. Once I’m in position, I tell him once more that I’m going to call police and that I recommend he leave before they arrive.

Inside, I no sooner grab the phone off the kitchen wall than I see the Goon coming in the back door. I turn toward him. On my right, there’s a long kitchen table and some chairs, no easy escape that direction, and on my left, there’s a kitchen counter with half a watermelon on it and, yes, that big carving knife. There’s also a blank expression on Goon’s face, and in an instant I’m thinking of how I’m boxed in, there’s a big knife within reach that I don’t want this guy to grab, that look on his face is all bad business, and the phone in my hand upon which I have just dialed 911 is abso-frikkin-lutely useless.

So Goon steps across my only easy escape route and I tell him quite firmly, “Do not approach me.”

This was good advice.

But Goon’s hands came up in what looked to me like a close, clinch, grapple attitude, and all that vibe telling me that he was here with bad intentions suddenly penetrated my thick skull, and everything my instructors had ever told me about people’s last thoughts being, “I can’t believe this is happening to me,” made a buncha sense.

When I realized that, yep, this bastard wasn’t going to listen to good advice and, yep, he was really here to do bad things, my very next thought was: Sorry, but this is going to hurt.

I leaped forward just as he closed, smashing the middle of his face with a straight right. His head popped back like it was hinged, and a very curious thing happened to his eyeballs. They just went white. His eyelids came down halfway and fibrillated like windowshades in a cyclone. I thought, Well, he’s gonna be mad about that, so I’d better make sure he doesn’t get back up. See, he was sagging after that first shot, but I cracked him over the left temple with my right elbow. His head slammed left and a stream of blood spouted out of his ear. I remember that distinctly. Then I cracked him on the right temple with a left hook. Another stream of blood came out of that ear, and I remember that distinctly, too.

By this time my cousin Harriet had come into the house and although I was vaguely aware of her, I saw almost nothing else except this Goon. He was still on his way down, but I caught him in a front choke and hit him with six skip knees, working my way up from groin to solar plexus as he kept falling. One the ground, I squeezed the choke as hard as I could and all of the blood squirting out of his ears, nose, and mouth stopped like a faucet turned off.

Goon reached up toward my face with a hand, going for eyeballs. I considered biting that hand as hard as I could and holding on tight, but in case his blood was full of infectious crap, I didn’t want any of it in my mouth. I also thought of rolling him to crack his neck, but figured a clever lawyer could find a way to sue the hell out of me, and right about then I saw his other hand in a perfect gooseneck, elbow on floor, forearm upright, hand slack, and momentarily though of hammer-fisting that one to break it. But I was still in nice-guy mode (this is important later).
Somewhere in the midst is this tussle, probably when we first hit the ground, I noticed that Goon had the telephone in hand, the cord wrapped all around his hand and forearm. How he got it I have no idea, because at the moment he closed, that phone was the least important thing in the world. I forgot all about it.

But back to the tussle. See, I thought that this guy was going to die if I kept beating him like I was, so I had hit him less vigorously with those knees than I should have. And then I thought he was going to die if I held that choke too long, so I let him go. These notions of being kind to bad guys is a bad idea. See, after I let go of the choke, the guy put one on me.

Right about then I heard my cousin shouting to someone (I found out later she had somehow gotten hold of the phone), “They’re on the ground! They’re fighting!”

I slipped the guy’s choke before he locked it in and though that I should, a) break the arm he had handily given me, b) go ahead and shear off his noggin. But I was still in nice-guy mode, so I pushed away and noticed that cousin Harriet was gone. I exited the back door. She wasn’t there. I stepped around the corner of the house. She wasn’t there.

Out front, I noticed the garage door was open, the inner door from garage to house was open, and she was gone. Wherever she went, I had no idea.

I went next door to a neighbor’s house and asked her to call police. Turns out they showed up surprisingly fast, having already been alerted to Goon’s presence in the neighborhood. Another neighbor next door told me later she had seen the Goon stagger outside and fall into a lounge chair, blood all over his head and face. Two cops found him back there, he staggered up, and it took two of them to put him on the ground. She said that when they flipped him over after handcuffing him, his head was in a big puddle of his own blood.

My brother showed up while I was still at the police-calling neighbor’s place and saw an ambulance out front, lots of police cars, and said that the EMTs had the Goon’s head so bandaged he looked like a Q-tip.

I was later told that the Goon became combative at the hospital and that it took four cops to restrain him, he had a concussion, some messed up dental work, and other injuries.

Found out at the pre-trial hearing that he’d been discharged from the Marines after six years and had just gotten out of prison after a two-year visit. He was charged with second-degree burglary. Speculation had it that he’d seen my cousin walking over for a pool visit in her bikini, he’d followed her, and his statement to her, “You know what I’m here for,” meant that he’d shown up to rape her and that I was just an obstacle in his way.

Who knows.

What I do know is that lots of furniture got rearranged during the fracas and I have no memory of any of it ever being touched. At least not by me. I also know that I was covered with the guy’s blood and didn’t even know it till one of the policemen on scene asked me to turn around to check for wounds (I was wearing only swim trunks at the time of this little episode). I also know that I was cleaning blood out of the carpet, off the furniture and bookcases and telephone and walls for about a couple weeks after. One thing my instructors had never mentioned was how much people would bleed, and how it would go all over the place, as long as you kept hitting them. Kinda silly to never think about that. (My only experience with blood during training was seeing my own.)

Ah, one more thing. Guy went to jail for six months. About another six months after that, I read that he’d assaulted two fishermen on a local river.

Okay, one more thing, too: If I ever do this sort of thing again, no more kindness.

So, after that long and boring and largely off-the-top-of-my-head recollection, how did it make me feel?

My initial reaction was simply one of moderate anxiety, simply because I didn’t know who the fellow was or what he was up to.

When it became plain that he was bent on violence, my only feeling was one of disappointment. He had chosen badly and it was going to hurt him. I had really hoped he’d just go away.

Was I frightened? No. Not really. My anxiety was simply a contest between not knowing what he was up to, feeling that vibe that he was up to no good, and trying to think of peaceful, rational reasons for why he was there. In other words, there was friction between wanting to rationalize the guy’s presence and that vibe that said danger.

For a few months afterward, though, I didn’t like strangers getting too close to me, and I sure as heck didn’t like them making any sudden moves too close to me, either.

Sorry for the unedited ramble. Hope it answers your questions.

Puma
09-27-2009, 10:20 PM
Years ago when my husband was out on a job (overnight), I picked up our daughter from the babysitter and we went home. Something didn't feel right immediately, but our dogs didn't seem upset, so I went upstairs and changed into home clothes. While we were eating supper I heard some noise upstairs that seemed a little out of place, but still no dog concern. It was finally time to get daughter ready for bed. As we went up the stairs, I saw that the entryway into the attic was pushed open (30" x 30" trapdoor of 1" plywood and plastered to match the ceiling in the hall - not so light weight). I turned daughter around, grabbed my purse, and we went to the neighbors house to call the police. They came after about a half hour (17 miles away). Of course, by that time, there was no one in the house. Their conclusion was that wind had lifted the trap door - with no windows open in the house to create any lift - come on now! (Twenty years later we had a tornado come through and it didn't lift the trapdoor.) My conclusion was that a neighborhood kid who'd come around some times to do odd jobs and earn some money was the culprit - reason the dogs weren't upset.

How did I feel (other than scared) - violated. It was a really creepy feeling and took quite a while after that for me to quit checking the entry way to the attic every time I went up the stairs. Puma

Rowan
09-27-2009, 10:29 PM
They'll get one chance to surrender, if circumstances allow. Then they'll be stopped.

Your reaction is the same as mine (I think)... The one time I thought someone had broken in (something had fallen off a shelf), I reached for the Sig and systematically cleared the house. Was I scared? You betcha but as you're a CI as well -- training and whatnot dictates your actions and you kind of go into "the zone".

thank you!

Rowan
09-27-2009, 10:36 PM
This happened twice to me over the last 35 years. I came into my house and the door had been kicked in and all my camera equipment and some jewelry had been stolen. I had just gotten a bunch of cameras and lenses from my dad, who wasn't using them anymore. They were beautiful Nikons and there was a telephoto and wide angle lens that I was dying to use but never got the chance.

The schumck also smashed some jewelry boxes and stole some of my jewelry, although it was all costume jewelry (good costume jewelry, thought) and I'm sure the fence he brought it too laughed at him.) It broke my heart a little to loose the camera stuff.

The other time, when I was in college, two young men pushed their way into my apartment and pulled a gun on me and my boyfriend. I got pissed off when they grabbed my flute (I had a flute final the next day.)

I stood up and said, "Give me back my flute!" They had the gun onj my boyfriend but then pointed it at me. That pissed me off even more and I repeated my demand. They didn't give it back. They turned tail and ran down the three flights of stairs and down the street with me after them.

I'm not much of a runner and they got away, but with nothing else. This still pisses me off. Son of a bitch!

By the way, I'm female and 5'2" tall.

Oh, one other time, I was in my half of the duplex in which I lived and sensed that something was off. I opened my door and saw that there were intruders in the apartment below mine. I went back in and called 911, but since we were in the less than good neighborhood, it took about 20 minutes for the cops to show up. I couldn't wait so I went outside to the front walk and waited for the burglers to come out. They saw me and went out the back door instead, but I'd frightened them and they didn't get anything. When the cops finally showed up they told me that I shouldn't have done that, but I certainly wasn't going to cower in my place while my neighbor got robbed.

Maybe I'm not usual.

Thank you, Stephanie! The bulldog is so you... :) I appreciate your insight as I have a hard time putting myself in other people's shoes in situations like this... I'm a "kill or be killed" sort (former Marine and former fed) so this really helps. I want my MC - who is neither former military or LE - to find a middle ground. She's not pissing her pants but she's struggling to overcome her fear and deal w/the situation while she waits for the cops. I've spoken to some people who said they ran for the closet and others who grab the firearm and prepare for a confrontation. (That brings up the entire Castle Law issue -- VA unfortunately requires you to take up a defensive position and wait for the intruder to confront you as opposed to TX and other states where a homeowner can shoot someone who crosses the threshold).

[If I ever get into a tight spot I'm calling you! :D] Thanks again.

Rowan
09-27-2009, 10:38 PM
Years ago when my husband was out on a job (overnight), I picked up our daughter from the babysitter and we went home. Something didn't feel right immediately, but our dogs didn't seem upset, so I went upstairs and changed into home clothes. While we were eating supper I heard some noise upstairs that seemed a little out of place, but still no dog concern. It was finally time to get daughter ready for bed. As we went up the stairs, I saw that the entryway into the attic was pushed open (30" x 30" trapdoor of 1" plywood and plastered to match the ceiling in the hall - not so light weight). I turned daughter around, grabbed my purse, and we went to the neighbors house to call the police. They came after about a half hour (17 miles away). Of course, by that time, there was no one in the house. Their conclusion was that wind had lifted the trap door - with no windows open in the house to create any lift - come on now! (Twenty years later we had a tornado come through and it didn't lift the trapdoor.) My conclusion was that a neighborhood kid who'd come around some times to do odd jobs and earn some money was the culprit - reason the dogs weren't upset.

How did I feel (other than scared) - violated. It was a really creepy feeling and took quite a while after that for me to quit checking the entry way to the attic every time I went up the stairs. Puma

Thank you, Puma. Feeling violated is what immediately came to my mind -- you think your home is sacred and when someone intrudes on the sanctity of the home it's hard to deal with. Like Stephanie you remained calm, cool and collected. :)

Rowan
09-27-2009, 10:46 PM
Found out at the pre-trial hearing that he’d been discharged from the Marines after six years and had just gotten out of prison after a two-year visit. He was charged with second-degree burglary. Speculation had it that he’d seen my cousin walking over for a pool visit in her bikini, he’d followed her, and his statement to her, “You know what I’m here for,” meant that he’d shown up to rape her and that I was just an obstacle in his way.

Who knows.

What I do know is that lots of furniture got rearranged during the fracas and I have no memory of any of it ever being touched. At least not by me. I also know that I was covered with the guy’s blood and didn’t even know it till one of the policemen on scene asked me to turn around to check for wounds (I was wearing only swim trunks at the time of this little episode). I also know that I was cleaning blood out of the carpet, off the furniture and bookcases and telephone and walls for about a couple weeks after. One thing my instructors had never mentioned was how much people would bleed, and how it would go all over the place, as long as you kept hitting them. Kinda silly to never think about that. (My only experience with blood during training was seeing my own.)

Ah, one more thing. Guy went to jail for six months. About another six months after that, I read that he’d assaulted two fishermen on a local river.

Okay, one more thing, too: If I ever do this sort of thing again, no more kindness.

So, after that long and boring and largely off-the-top-of-my-head recollection, how did it make me feel?

My initial reaction was simply one of moderate anxiety, simply because I didn’t know who the fellow was or what he was up to.

When it became plain that he was bent on violence, my only feeling was one of disappointment. He had chosen badly and it was going to hurt him. I had really hoped he’d just go away.

Was I frightened? No. Not really. My anxiety was simply a contest between not knowing what he was up to, feeling that vibe that he was up to no good, and trying to think of peaceful, rational reasons for why he was there. In other words, there was friction between wanting to rationalize the guy’s presence and that vibe that said danger.

For a few months afterward, though, I didn’t like strangers getting too close to me, and I sure as heck didn’t like them making any sudden moves too close to me, either.

Sorry for the unedited ramble. Hope it answers your questions.

Thank you, Summonere. What is your background (ie., your training you mentioned)? LE or military? It sounds like you remained quite calm (along with opening a can of whup ass) and I'm wondering if that's just your nature or the result of your training. :)

wittyusernamehere
09-27-2009, 10:51 PM
When I was about 12 years old, two men tried to break in to our house. I was watching my siblings and my parents were gone. What I remember was sheer panic, and getting the shakes, and having a hard time dialing 911 because of all the adrenaline made my fingers stiff and jabby.

At the same time, part of my mind kept insisting that the men trying to break the door down could not possibly have bad intentions, and so if I could only think it through correctly, I'd understand why good people were trying to do what they were doing.

We had a rottweiler who went bezerk and nearly took the door out from the inside trying to get at the burglars. I remember trying to quiet the dog because she was so out of control trying to protect us - I think I was still unable to accept what was happening.

I heard one of the guys say through the door, "that sounds like a big dog." And then they left. In some ways, that was the scariest part, because it was so quiet. When I went to call 911, the operator told me to stay on the line, which was one of those old corded telephones. While I was on hold, I saw that earlier in the day, we had left the sliding glass door open, and I couldn't close it without letting go of the phone.

I was very sure that as soon as I let go of the phone to close and lock the door, the burglars would be on the other side, pulling it open and I wouldn't even be able to tell the 911 operator what had happened. So I left the door open and stayed on the phone. Which, as I'm sure anyone could guess, nearly gave my mom a heart attack later when she found out what had happened.

Hope this helps!

chocowrites
09-27-2009, 10:54 PM
We weren't exactly burgled, but here's my experience if it helps any. I think I was eleven at the time:

I got home from school, and noticed that the handle on the front door looked funny. The right edge was all dented, and the wood on the door was chipped away. My imagination got going, and I thought of burglars hammering away at the door, but then I dismissed it as a silly thought because that would never happen around here and I was really thirsty and hot and wanted to watch TV.

So I went inside the house anyways. My dog greeted me enthusiastically, and whined a bit and licked my hand, which wasn't that much out of the ordinary. I called my Mom to tell her I got home from school all right. I conveniently forgot to mention anything from the door, and Mom was coming home in half an hour anyways.

When she got home, she immediately asked me what I'd done to the door. I'd completely forgotten about it.

Me: It was like that when I came home. I thought that maybe you'd done it.
Mom: What? (frowns)
Me: (tries to avert blame) Uh...I think, maybe somebody tried to break in.
Sister: What?

(It should be mentioned here that I broke pretty much everything inside the house and never wanted to admit to it. So it makes sense that they were suspicious of me at first).

But I kept saying that, and at last my Mom called the police. He showed up at our doorstep, and I sat on the stairs and tried to listen in. And it turned out that two houses further down the street had been robbed that day, and they'd been completely cleaned out.

The weird thing was though, that somebody had obviously tried to break in to our house, but hadn't taken anything. The policemen said that they were perhaps 80% done with breaking through the door and they must've been scared off by something. It turns out that my dog must've scared them off; at least that's what the policeman said.

Throughout it all: I wasn't scared in the least, just a bit anxious about the door because I thought that it was weird and hoped I wouldn't get blamed for it. Then I was excited by the policeman because he was carrying a real gun and then proud of my dog. The next day, I proceeded to tell all my friends at school. Mostly I thought how stupid the burglars must've been because the fence and side door had been unlocked.

Rowan
09-27-2009, 11:03 PM
Thank you, Wittyusernamehere & Chocowrites!
I hadn't even thought of how a child would react to something like this... thank goodness for dogs. People always say that a dog is often the best deterrent to crime and your stories support that ---- good thing a lot of criminals are afraid of dogs.

wittyusernamehere: your situation is similar to my MCs too. Being in the house and getting that adrenaline rush as you reach for the phone and your mind just starts racing, etc.

Thanks again.

wittyusernamehere
09-27-2009, 11:07 PM
FWIW on how a burglar might act: My mom had someone break in to her office building while she was there.

When she was re-telling how it was a bad vibe, I asked her for specifics, and she said, "The guy didn't make any social eye contact. He saw I was there, and he went to casing the rest of the room."

When another person came into view, the guy turned around and walked out. During that month, someone was killed in their building in that area. Don't know if it was the same guy, but it was a pretty small town for there to be two guys doing break ins around there.

Again, hope this is helpful.

Rowan
09-27-2009, 11:17 PM
FWIW on how a burglar might act: My mom had someone break in to her office building while she was there.

When she was re-telling how it was a bad vibe, I asked her for specifics, and she said, "The guy didn't make any social eye contact. He saw I was there, and he went to casing the rest of the room."

When another person came into view, the guy turned around and walked out. During that month, someone was killed in their building in that area. Don't know if it was the same guy, but it was a pretty small town for there to be two guys doing break ins around there.

Again, hope this is helpful.

Thank you - that does help! Burglars are as varied as their "victims" and I can't imagine what your Mother was thinking at the time. Sounds like this guy later made the mistake of targeting someone like Summonere. ;)

~*Kate*~
09-27-2009, 11:53 PM
I have two semi-relevant experiences.

When I was 5 we pulled up to our house and could hear things banging around inside. My mom collected antique cans and knew immediately that someone was going through them looking for money. She locked my little sister and me in the car and tried to go through the garage door, but she couldn't (he had pushed the fridge against it). So all 5'0" of my redheaded mother goes through the front door with a hairbrush in her pocket, yelling that she has a gun. She went in the kitchen, saw that we'd been robbed, and came back out to take us to the neighbor's house. She found out later that the man was in her bedroom while she was in the house.

He stole some jewelry, my uncle's leather jacket, some other stuff. A few weeks later she saw the guy walking around our neighborhood in my uncle's jacket. She called my uncle and tried to convince him to round up his roofing buddies and come beat the guy up since the police didn't seem interested, but he had the brains to say no. We moved not too much later.

My other experience was coming out of the high school around 6:00 one evening to find a very large man trying to hot wire my Jeep. Instead of going back in for help, I ran at him yelling profanities. I'm the same size as my mom, but lucky for me, he ran off. In a fit I drove around trying to find him, then got my head together and went to a friend's house to calm down.

I don't recommend either reaction to anyone, but that's how it went down. Adrenaline trumps logic every time, at least in my family.

StephanieFox
09-28-2009, 12:47 AM
It seems like us little gals are kinda mean when provoked. I think one big thing is that most of us do not react intellectually. We don't say, "Oh, there's some bad guy with a gun/in my house/stealing my stuff." My reaction was pure pissed-offedness. I'm usually very polite. I'm such a lady. :) I like to set a proper table and always say please and thank you. But something just snapped.

I'm sure that if I actually had to hit someone, they wouldn't be hurt in the slightest. But bad guys do't like the unexpected and a short female supposed victim advancing instead of running away or fainting is beyond their thought process. If anyone hurt my dog, though, they're dead meat.

(All of my stories happened before I met my husband, the martial arts instructor.)

Rowan
09-28-2009, 12:51 AM
It seems like us little gals are kinda mean when provoked. I think one big thing is that most of us do not react intellectually. We don't say, "Oh, there's some bad guy with a gun/in my house/stealing my stuff." My reaction was pure pissed-offedness. I'm usually very polite. I'm such a lady. :) I like to set a proper table and always say please and thank you. But something just snapped.

I'm sure that if I actually had to hit someone, they wouldn't be hurt in the slightest. But bad guys do't like the unexpected and a short female supposed victim advancing instead of running away or fainting is beyond their thought process. If anyone hurt my dog, though, they're dead meat.

(All of my stories happened before I met my husband, the martial arts instructor.)

You just reminded me of Anita Blake! :) I think my first thought would be "I'm going to die!" followed by "Where's my Sig?" :D

Nivarion
09-28-2009, 01:46 AM
What I would do personally would be to call for one of my brothers in the other room to get the shot gun and kill them. And hope that they wouldn't wait to see if either

A. I don't have a brother
B. I do have a brother but he isn't there at the moment
C. I don't have a gun.

Because that last one would screw me.

Most criminals will run if you even start to talk about your guns, or call for someone else in the house to get a gun and kill them. This is because there are very few rules on when you can't kill an intruder.

Rowan
09-28-2009, 01:58 AM
I don't recommend either reaction to anyone, but that's how it went down. Adrenaline trumps logic every time, at least in my family.
Well said! :)

Rowan
09-28-2009, 02:03 AM
What I would do personally would be to call for one of my brothers in the other room to get the shot gun and kill them. And hope that they wouldn't wait to see if either

A. I don't have a brother
B. I do have a brother but he isn't there at the moment
C. I don't have a gun.

Because that last one would screw me.

Most criminals will run if you even start to talk about your guns, or call for someone else in the house to get a gun and kill them. This is because there are very few rules on when you can't kill an intruder.

Thank you, Nivarion :) That's actually a good strategy - start yelling about guns and the gang of thugs upstairs with you!

As for the last part of your post... Unfortunately, Virginia (my home state) has no Castle Law, which is strange considering even CA has one! :(
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Doctrine_in_the_United_States

StephanieFox
09-28-2009, 02:04 AM
OK, this is just me. I'm not judging anyone else's choices. I have never owned a gun. I will never own a gun. I don't hunt, I don't need one for self defense and as you can see by my story (above) I'm the one chasing the guys with the guns armed with only a bad attitude, body posture and nasty verbage.

I think that my having a gun around the house means that I am in fear, expecting bad guys to come into my house and hurt me. I know it happened before, but that was when I was living in the 'hood and next to a crack house. If I'd had one then, either the bad guys would have shot me, the bad guys would have broken in to steal my gun or I would have shot one of them. I don't know about you, but the idea of killing another person when you can get rid of them simply by yelling at them, doesn't appeal to me. I don't want to kill anyone. It's not part of my hero fantasy.

I've managed to defuse some bad situations (I stopped a guy in the next apartment from beating his girlfriend, for example) by not being afraid and using Jew-do and Jew-juitsu, the ability to use words instead of weapons. This has worked for me. Bad folks just don't mess with me in the first place.

Peace! Love! Rock 'n' Roll!

backslashbaby
09-28-2009, 02:09 AM
I came home alone to my first apartment and heard a crash in my bedroom while I was still putting my keys up. My first thought was the cats - but the cats came from the other hall, with big eyes.

I thought Don't be silly. Something probably just fell and had the urge to go into the bedroom and see. But I thought better of it. I got myself halfway out the door already and yelled for him to just get out, that I was leaving and I'd be back with the cops. Then I ran as fast as I could to my car and called as I drove away.

The screenporch was slit with a razor, and someone had been there.

Being young, leaning towards considering myself silly was the feeling I most remember. But I'm stubborn and knew somebody could be in there - why not? It does happen. I hoped to God telling him I was leaving was a good idea. It was, apparently.


The next time was a few years ago, and I was in the shower. My dog had already bitten the dude [in my porch!], dude left in getaway car, and neighbor had 911 on the phone all while I was shaving my legs! Crazy. And some folks thought it was bad that I let my dog posture to strangers coming up until I said otherwise. That was exactly why! He was very proud, btw :D

Rowan
09-28-2009, 02:18 AM
OK, this is just me. I'm not judging anyone else's choices. I have never owned a gun. I will never own a gun. I don't hunt, I don't need one for self defense and as you can see by my story (above) I'm the one chasing the guys with the guns armed with only a bad attitude, body posture and nasty verbage.

I think that my having a gun around the house means that I am in fear, expecting bad guys to come into my house and hurt me. I know it happened before, but that was when I was living in the 'hood and next to a crack house. If I'd had one then, either the bad guys would have shot me, the bad guys would have broken in to steal my gun or I would have shot one of them. I don't know about you, but the idea of killing another person when you can get rid of them simply by yelling at them, doesn't appeal to me. I don't want to kill anyone. It's not part of my hero fantasy.

I've managed to defuse some bad situations (I stopped a guy in the next apartment from beating his girlfriend, for example) by not being afraid and using Jew-do and Jew-juitsu, the ability to use words instead of weapons. This has worked for me. Bad folks just don't mess with me in the first place.

Peace! Love! Rock 'n' Roll!

This is starting to remind me of that "gun/no gun" thread that went South and was closed by a Mod... but interesting points and thank you for clarifying you are stating your personal thoughts and aren't judging anyone else, etc. (cheers!) :)

I personally own guns but then I'm a former LE agent and I still go target shooting on a regular basis (for furn and to maintain my proficiency). In short I'm well-trained in the use of firearms (along with the legal ramifications re: the use of deadly force). :guns:

For me it's a hobby and while I'm trained in hand-to-hand combat (USMC), defensive tactics (Fed LE agency) and Aikido, if someone enters my residence intent on raping and/or murdering me they are going down no questions asked. Personally, I don't wanna get up close and personal w/such a personand I would only shoot someone as a last resort. :box:I don't live in fear of this happening but there are people out there who have no qualms about taking your life for a few hundred dollars AND there are sociopathic lunatics out there who'd enjoy doing much worse than stealing your valuables. Please know I'm not trigger happy or anything....and I believe in responsible gun ownership. Live offensively! :D

I hope this doesn't set off a flurry of anti-hunting and anti-gun posts. :) :e2thud:

Rowan
09-28-2009, 02:20 AM
I came home alone to my first apartment and heard a crash in my bedroom while I was still putting my keys up. My first thought was the cats - but the cats came from the other hall, with big eyes.

I thought Don't be silly. Something probably just fell and had the urge to go into the bedroom and see. But I thought better of it. I got myself halfway out the door already and yelled for him to just get out, that I was leaving and I'd be back with the cops. Then I ran as fast as I could to my car and called as I drove away.

The screenporch was slit with a razor, and someone had been there.

Being young, leaning towards considering myself silly was the feeling I most remember. But I'm stubborn and knew somebody could be in there - why not? It does happen. I hoped to God telling him I was leaving was a good idea. It was, apparently.


The next time was a few years ago, and I was in the shower. My dog had already bitten the dude [in my porch!], dude left in getaway car, and neighbor had 911 on the phone all while I was shaving my legs! Crazy. And some folks thought it was bad that I let my dog posture to strangers coming up until I said otherwise. That was exactly why! He was very proud, btw :D


Backslashbaby --- you, like Kate, seem to have bad luck when it comes to multiple intruders!! Was this a rural area or city? And once again -- GO DOGS!!!! :)

JMBlackman
09-28-2009, 02:23 AM
Last year, while I was sleeping in my bedroom, two men broke into the house. I shared this apartment with my now fiance, two of his male friends and their girlfriends (yes, it was a full apartment). My bedroom was at the very end of the apartment, opposite the front door. I didn't hear them break the door open with a crowbar. I did however, hear my puppy growling at the locked bedroom door.

Two seconds after I woke up, the bedroom door made a bump noise. I thought it was one of the other girlfriends dropping off my laundry, so I got up to open the door. But then I saw the crow bar sticking through the side of door, bowing it out to the point that it was about to break open with me standing on the opposite side in nothing but panties. I didn't mean to but I screamed, "Stop!" like I was in some bad infomercial about intruders.

Amazingly enough, it worked! He retracted the crowbar and ran down the hall. This is when I found out there was a second intruder. I heard a second set of foot steps and the shadow of this man stopped right in front of the door, stood there for a few seconds and then ran after the second set.

I grabbed a hammer, called the cops (and my fiance) and sat in the corner with my puppy behind me (like I'd protect her when she's the one who had saved me). My hands were sweaty. My heart was beating so hard it hurt and I had to pee really, really bad because of how scared I was of the second guy, not the first one. My legs were weak and I just kept thinking, "I'm not going to let anything happen to this dog." As if they were interested in my mutt!

The cops came and I was notified that these two men had been hitting up our neighbor apartments as well all in one day. Nice to know I wasn't special. A TV and a PS3 were stolen from our apartment.

In response to the whole incident, we purchased a gun which I am now able to shoot proficiently. I have not had to use it and hope not to ever have to, but it makes me feel nice when I'm alone. I still jump up randomly at night and during the day when I hear loud sounds. The apartment I'm in now is much smaller and I have nightmares that if someone broke in, I wouldn't have enough time to do anything because our bedroom is so close to the door.

Anyway, moral of the story: yelling is powerful. Haha.

backslashbaby
09-28-2009, 02:28 AM
Dogs rule!! And my guy is just a Chow/Heeler mix. He loves to show his guard-y side - lives to guard things! - but he is a puddle of love. I don't mind that people think he's ferocious if they don't know him. It works nicely!

Yeah, it's rural out here and the cops take a while to get here. The 1st incident was probably a nutty Ex of my roommate who began stalking her.

StephanieFox
09-28-2009, 02:36 AM
I agree. The best protection is a dog. Better, even than a gun. Guns aren't snuggly. Plus, dogs they scare bad guys simply by barking. Or in my dog's case, snorting loudly. Or snoring loudly, depending on the time of day.

Rowan
09-28-2009, 02:36 AM
Dogs rule!! And my guy is just a Chow/Heeler mix. He loves to show his guard-y side - lives to guard things! - but he is a puddle of love. I don't mind that people think he's ferocious if they don't know him. It works nicely!

Yeah, it's rural out here and the cops take a while to get here. The 1st incident was probably a nutty Ex of my roommate who began stalking her.

A chow heeler mix would be pretty! Blue tongue?? My friend had the red heelers (so pretty). I have two miniature poodles (don't laugh). One is a very small standard and he has a big dog bark. Since he's pitch black the white teeth really stand out when he snarls. The other cute smaller one who resembles a cuddly stuffed toy is actually the threat. Remember that rabbit in Monty Python? He inhabits my dog. :ROFL: He's nice to people he knows but if someone squirrely approaches me --- I think he longs to go vampoodle on them...

Stalkers are scary!!!!!!!!!!!!!

~*Kate*~
09-28-2009, 02:36 AM
My first incident was in Tulsa and the second was in broad daylight in a town of 58,000, not counting university students.

Puma
09-28-2009, 03:10 AM
I'm back again. We live out in the country (obvious from my half hour response time by the police in my earlier post). There are times when things happen out on the road and people need help - we don't always hear these things happen. If someone knocks on our door late at night, usual protocol is to answer it with a S&W in one hand. No one who's ever really needed help has been upset by our response to their knock - they understood. My nephew who stopped by to bum ten bucks from me at one am one night when my husband was out of town was shocked however.

We have been robbed twice (actually my husband's detached workshop was), but fortunately for the robbers we weren't home when it happened. Neither of us would take too kindly to that. (And I am a decent shot.) Puma

Rowan
09-28-2009, 03:59 AM
My bedroom was at the very end of the apartment, opposite the front door. I didn't hear them break the door open with a crowbar. I did however, hear my puppy growling at the locked bedroom door....Two seconds after I woke up, the bedroom door made a bump noise. I thought it was one of the other girlfriends dropping off my laundry, so I got up to open the door. But then I saw the crow bar sticking through the side of door, bowing it out to the point that it was about to break open with me standing on the opposite side in nothing but panties. I didn't mean to but I screamed, "Stop!" like I was in some bad infomercial about intruders.


If that happened to me I'd be jumping at every little sound! I'm glad this was a "happy ending" in that the intruders left and you were unharmed. I always wonder if I'd actually hear if I forgot to set the alarm and someone got through the front door (as you didn't) or if my dogs would wake me up first, etc. That gives me food for thought re: my WIP although I think I'll make her a light sleeper. Thank you! :)

icerose
09-28-2009, 04:13 AM
During the first year of my marriage we moved into a studio house that had no walls other than the bathroom. It was tiny. My husband worked graveyards at wonderful wal-mart *sarcasm*.

I was seven months pregnant at the time of the incident, it was around midnight, the house was completely dark, there wasn't even a moon that night and it was a seedier part of town.

I woke up from a dead sleep. (I am a very heavy sleeper.) There I'm sitting, wide awake without a clue why, then I heard them.

I could hear four distinct male voices outside, they rattled the door. All my senses are tingling. They can't get through the deadbolt. That's good. Then one suggests trying the window. There's only one window in the house, it's right by my bed where I'm sleeping all alone. The weight of my baby belly makes me acutely aware it's not just my life that's in danger. A frantic kick from inside gets me moving. Those bastards are going to come in and they know I'm here alone.

I pull out the .270 rifle. I grab the shells and load it. I calmly pick up the phone and call my husband (Not the police because you know that would be logical) and tell him I'm going to shoot an intruder. Then I hung up the phone. The window slides open. It's an old window, some paint chips fall on the side. The window is barely illuminated by the single street lamp. I take off the safety, and take aim. I don't want to kill anyone. So I aim off to the side, about where his arm should be and fire. They all scatter, leaving some blood behind on the window seal and ground. My husband had called 911 right after I'd hung up, there was a cop patrolling the neighborhood one street away. My husband worked on the other side of town. He got there first.

The intruders are gone. The police officer lectures me. I should have let him get all the way inside before firing, and I should have killed me because he could come back and sue me.

I can't think, I'm pissed off. Someone was coming after me and my baby. The next day our neighbor showed up with a great big bandage on his arm. He'd been scouting our apartment since we moved in, he'd gotten out of jail just two weeks before we moved in for rape and robbery.

I stayed at my sister's that next night, we were moving the day after. They tried again that night, while I wasn't there but my husband and his blue heeler (from his parent's house) were. When the cop showed up, again just down the street, again taking a good 20 minutes to drive up the block (lazy bastard). He asked my husband why I wasn't there, that they were less likely to break in if I were home. My husband responded with a simple "What if they broke in and raped her." The cop responded "We could arrest them for that." Seriously.

And people wonder why we own guns.

That was my one and hopefully only break in. The fear didn't kick in until after it was all over and I had my husband's arms around me. It ticked me off that they were coming after me and my unborn baby and I wasn't about to let them get any where near me.

Rowan
09-28-2009, 04:32 AM
...I woke up from a dead sleep. (I am a very heavy sleeper.) There I'm sitting, wide awake without a clue why, then I heard them....I pull out the .270 rifle. I grab the shells and load it. I calmly pick up the phone and call my husband (Not the police because you know that would be logical) and tell him I'm going to shoot an intruder. Then I hung up the phone. The window slides open. It's an old window, some paint chips fall on the side. The window is barely illuminated by the single street lamp. I take off the safety, and take aim. I don't want to kill anyone. So I aim off to the side, about where his arm should be and fire. They all scatter, leaving some blood behind on the window seal and ground. My husband had called 911 right after I'd hung up, there was a cop patrolling the neighborhood one street away. My husband worked on the other side of town. He got there first.

The intruders are gone. The police officer lectures me. I should have let him get all the way inside before firing, and I should have killed me because he could come back and sue me.

I can't think, I'm pissed off. Someone was coming after me and my baby. The next day our neighbor showed up with a great big bandage on his arm. He'd been scouting our apartment since we moved in, he'd gotten out of jail just two weeks before we moved in for rape and robbery.

I stayed at my sister's that next night, we were moving the day after. They tried again that night, while I wasn't there but my husband and his blue heeler (from his parent's house) were. When the cop showed up, again just down the street, again taking a good 20 minutes to drive up the block (lazy bastard). He asked my husband why I wasn't there, that they were less likely to break in if I were home. My husband responded with a simple "What if they broke in and raped her." The cop responded "We could arrest them for that." Seriously.

And people wonder why we own guns.

That was my one and hopefully only break in. The fear didn't kick in until after it was all over and I had my husband's arms around me. It ticked me off that they were coming after me and my unborn baby and I wasn't about to let them get any where near me.

Thank you, Icerose. Your situation is very close to my WIP and very helpful. Were you in Utah at the time? I'm amazed at the cop's response as I believe Utah has a Castle Law and a stand your ground law. I'm not an expert on this CL thing but by all accounts your shooting was justifiable, etc. The fact it was your neighbor - already convicted of rape/robbery - now that's frightening. Another example of someone who likely wouldn't have been deterred by anything short of a gun and the fact they'd tried again is unbelievable. Glad you and the baby weren't hurt! :)

icerose
09-28-2009, 04:47 AM
Thank you, Icerose. Your situation is very close to my WIP and very helpful. Were you in Utah at the time? I'm amazed at the cop's response as I believe Utah has a Castle Law and a stand your ground law. I'm not an expert on this CL thing but by all accounts your shooting was justifiable, etc. The fact it was your neighbor - already convicted of rape/robbery - now that's frightening. Another example of someone who likely wouldn't have been deterred by anything short of a gun and the fact they'd tried again is unbelievable. Glad you and the baby weren't hurt! :)

Yes, in Utah, but in a very rural part, and this cop was subsequently fired for his behavior toward us.

It was very scary and we had bad feelings about him and how he and his friends would drink beer and always be watching us. He got our routines down and waited for me to be home and my husband to be gone which made it extra scary. They had planned this.

I couldn't believe it either and it's why we got the heck out of there, we broke our lease to do it, but it was worth the penalty to be away from him.

Also I forgot to add that the gunshot was deafening. If the window had been closed I probably would have blown out my ear drums. Outside guns are noisy, inside they are deafening. I could feel the shot, outside the mule kick this gun had.

Cranky
09-28-2009, 04:49 AM
When I was eleven, we lived in a small town in South Dakota. So small, in fact, that people (including us) routinely left their doors unlocked.

One night, near Halloween, I heard our squeaky front door swing open. I wasn't asleep as of yet, and I was wondering what the heck, when I saw through my open bedroom door a dark figure walk through the dining room (my bedroom was just off there) towards the hall and the bathroom. The light went on, then I heard someone urinating. The light went off, and my parent's bedroom door opened (all the doors in this old house squeaked like mad, and by now I was wide awake). There was a pause, and then I hear my stepfather yell, "What the hell? Get out of here!"

He frog marched the stranger out of the house and onto the street. The stranger was drunk as a skunk and disoriented, so we didn't call the cops, because he apparently believed he still lived in that house. Yeah, he was that drunk.

Things settled down. We all tried to go back to sleep, but I couldn't. And the man came back. He stood in the dining room for a moment, doing I don't know what. I lay there in my bed, blankets clutched to my chin, because I could see he had a knife and I was too terrified to move or even breathe too loudly for fear he would hear me, look over and see me through my open door. (I am not proud of this, btw) He went back to my parent's room, and this time, my stepfather was ready for him, and chased him out of the house with a pair of nunchucks, without a stitch on. We called the cops, but the guy had vanished.

Everything settled down once again, until we heard sirens an hour or so later. This stranger had broken into a house down the street, gone into the lady's bedroom, and stabbed her. She lived, though, and thankfully.

As you may have noted above, my reaction to the house being broken into was pretty much paralyzing terror. I couldn't speak, couldn't move, nothing. I try to cut myself a little slack, since I was just a child, but...eh.

Rowan
09-28-2009, 04:57 AM
Everything settled down once again, until we heard sirens an hour or so later. This stranger had broken into a house down the street, gone into the lady's bedroom, and stabbed her. She lived, though, and thankfully.

As you may have noted above, my reaction to the house being broken into was pretty much paralyzing terror. I couldn't speak, couldn't move, nothing. I try to cut myself a little slack, since I was just a child, but...eh.

Oh my gosh! I'd have been petrified if that happened to me at eleven years old. You have no reason to be embarrassed or anything of the sort. Wow... I'd have barricaded myself in my bedroom from that night forward. The fact this guy subsequently stabbed someone else --- thankfully it wasn't you/anyone in your family --- and I'm relieved to hear she made it.

I'm learning a lot from not only everyone's personal experience but also the responding officer's actions and the intruders' MO for that matter.

Thank you! :)

Summonere
09-28-2009, 06:45 AM
Thank you, Summonere. What is your background (ie., your training you mentioned)? LE or military? It sounds like you remained quite calm (along with opening a can of whup ass) and I'm wondering if that's just your nature or the result of your training.

I’m usually considered calm by nature, or so people tell me. Who knows. Maybe that’s why I remained calm through the fracas. But maybe it was the training which, up to then, was neither military nor law enforcement. I was just a plain vanilla-bean guy who had studied a variety of martial arts for about nine years prior to the Goon’s visit, and prior to his visit, I had just come off of a four-year-stretch of two-hours-a-day, six-days-a-week training in a mixture of Muay Thai boxing, Silat, Kali, American Freestyle Karate, and a smattering of Jujitsu. At the moment the Goon closed, it didn’t seem like there was anything he could pull that I didn’t have an answer for which, right or wrong, may be why I wasn’t overly excited. Maybe I was lucky. At the time, though, I remember wishing I had learned more Aikido so that I could have controlled the fellow with pain compliance as opposed to bloodshed.

Summonere
09-28-2009, 06:46 AM
…thank goodness for dogs. People always say that a dog is often the best deterrent to crime and your stories support that ---- good thing a lot of criminals are afraid of dogs.

Yeah, dogs. I had one at the time. A boxer. He sniffed the guy while he stood in the open doorway to the back porch. Later I found him napping under my bed, apparently having missed everything (the dog, that is, not the Goon).

Summonere
09-28-2009, 07:17 AM
StephanieFox sez:
OK, this is just me. I'm not judging anyone else's choices. I have never owned a gun. I will never own a gun. I don't hunt, I don't need one for self defense and as you can see by my story (above) I'm the one chasing the guys with the guns armed with only a bad attitude, body posture and nasty verbage.


Curious thing about my little fracas was that I owned a pistol at the time, and I enjoyed target shooting as a fun, relaxing little hobby, with particular interest in combat shooting. But that was all range stuff and not real-life-I’m-ever-going-to-need-this-at-home stuff. So the unloaded pistol remained in one room and the ammunition for it remained in another, at the opposite end of the house, and there I was, in between the two of them. I’ve since changed that habit.



I think that my having a gun around the house means that I am in fear, expecting bad guys to come into my house and hurt me. I know it happened before, but that was when I was living in the 'hood and next to a crack house.

I was in a nice middle-class neighborhood at the time, as opposed to a cracky one :(. That said, though I keep a firearm handy these days, I still think that the chances of being the victim of a crime are pretty low, and that I have much better ways to use my energy than to fear or worry for such things. It’s unfortunate, though, that some (not you, because you are kind and witty and intelligent and state your positions without rancor and with clarity :)) sometimes get the idea that those who enjoy the utility of arms must therefore wallow in paranoia, or that they harbor evil intentions for fellow men. Ah, well.

I do, however, have another burglary story I’ll relate later, after sleep, one that pertains to my brother the doctor and his wife, also a doctor. (It’s presently late in my neck o’ the woods.)



…I don't know about you, but the idea of killing another person when you can get rid of them simply by yelling at them, doesn't appeal to me. I don't want to kill anyone. It's not part of my hero fantasy.

Agreed.



I've managed to defuse some bad situations (I stopped a guy in the next apartment from beating his girlfriend, for example) by not being afraid and using Jew-do and Jew-juitsu, the ability to use words instead of weapons. This has worked for me. Bad folks just don't mess with me in the first place.


Yeah. I’ve discovered that this has worked for me more often than not. Many years in a terrible job provided plenty of opportunities to find this out. Some people, though, just don’t listen.

Summonere
09-28-2009, 09:29 PM
Has anyone been the victim of a burglary/break-in while you were at home? What went through your head? How did you react and what did you do? How did it make you feel, etc.? [I can only imagine how frightening this would be...]

My brother and his wife were both at home with their infant daughter when someone broke in and stole, among other things, a loaded pistol. They felt violated, as if their impervious castle was no more, their security system questionable, their sense of safety – that was probably the biggest casualty – utterly disrupted, largely because they realized that a great many terrible things could have happened. (We'll get to this latter part in a moment. It's more interesting than it may at first appear.)

Brother and his wife are both doctors. They live in a very nice neighborhood, their home outfitted with a top-notch security system. But the burglary occurred at two in the morning while Sis'n law was up late doing taxes at the kitchen table, her infant daughter quietly asleep in the next room, while the wind blew and blustered outside. She had turned off the security system because she kept going from kitchen to garage to gather a few things stored there while she worked on her taxes.

And while working on her taxes, sitting at the kitchen table with her back to the door that led into the garage, she heard something thump. She thought nothing of it, believing that it was the wind. Something had probably blown against the house.

Next morning, all awoke to discover that someone had knocked open the side door into the garage. To get to that door, the person had to vault a six-foot fence, and once inside the garage, that person had ransacked two cars parked there, stealing a camera, checkbooks, bags full of office paperwork, assorted other odds and ends, and one H&K USP .45, fully loaded and topped off with 13 rounds.

Sis'n law and brother about had a stroke about that when they realized that Sis'n law had been sitting with her back to an unlocked door through which the armed burglar could have entered, and that their wee daughter was mere tippy-toe steps away, had said burglar snuck thattaway.

They called police and went to work late that morning because the police had some very interesting things to say, as did their neighbors who showed up to see what all the commotion was about. Turns out the police already had a suspect in mind, and that he was well-known in the neighborhood for a string of juvenile arrests. This kiddo, we'll call him Thug-Boy, had been witnessed committing arson and vandalism; he was the prime suspect in a string of other burglaries in and around the neighborhood; he was the prime suspect in some pet vanishments and mutilations (one of which, a rabbit, had been tossed upon the front porch of a home where a 14-year-old girl lived, in whose window he was suspected of peeping); he was known to have stolen some bicycles and to hang out with some other rotten little apples, one of whom had seriously knifed a guy out walking his dogs in this nice neighborhood.

Police and a neighbor, a psychologist, all said that Thug-Boy was only working his way up to more serious crime, and that it would eventually involve murder. But, as the kid was a juvenile, there was little to nothing that they could do.

A year-and-a-half to two years later, they were right. Thug-Boy shot one of his cohorts through the brain, said cohort allegedly wanting to leave Thug-Boy's merry band of mayhemery. Thug-Boy claimed his cohort died in a game of Russian Roulette. Sans witnesses, and authorities getting none too excited because one thug killed another, and because juvenile status remained, Thug-Boy got a year in the juvenile pokey and then was out.

All of that said, Sis'n law's feelings on the matter have changed, but brother's have not. Right after the burglary, and for perhaps up to a month later, Sis'n law proclaimed loudly that she would get a gun and a concealed carry license and that she'd shoot the kid on site if he stepped foot on her property ever again. She neither got a gun, a concealed carry license, nor even showed interest in visiting the local range to shoot any of the other guns that my brother owned. For that matter, she wasn't even interested in getting a can of pepper spray. She seems to have gotten over the shock and affront of the whole event and has returned to a state of unprepared wariness. (More on this in a sec.)

My brother, too, seems to have gotten over the same sense of affront, but he acquired a concealed carry license and keeps a watchful eye.

And so, one day, one of Thug-Boy's cohorts walked into their medical clinic, which was closed for the weekend. (There seems to be a theme here of not locking doors, by the way.) The clinic is very close to Sis'n law and brother's home, and Sis'n law was working there alone to catch up on paperwork. She recognized this kiddo as one of Thug-Boy's cohorts. Some loud words sent him scurrying. And who was waiting in the parking lot for him? None other than Thug-Boy. They vamoosed. Strangely, Sis'n law didn't call police and seems to feel that Loud Words will always be Magic. I hope so.

Thug-Boy officially remains a juvenile, and he still remains in the area.

Nivarion
09-29-2009, 03:39 AM
OK, this is just me. I'm not judging anyone else's choices. I have never owned a gun. I will never own a gun. I don't hunt, I don't need one for self defense and as you can see by my story (above) I'm the one chasing the guys with the guns armed with only a bad attitude, body posture and nasty verbage. I have yet to own a gun either, but that is mainly becuase my mom doesn't want one in the house and the age limit. However when I turn 21 I'm going to go CCW. I've already seen too much shit.


I think that my having a gun around the house means that I am in fear, expecting bad guys to come into my house and hurt me. That is a valid position. But I'm not really worried about the bad guys hurting me. I'm more worried about them hurting my brothers, or my family. I've already had enough bad guys try to hurt me. IMO Its better to own a gun that you never need, than it is to need a gun and not have one.
I know it happened before, but that was when I was living in the 'hood and next to a crack house. If I'd had one then, either the bad guys would have shot me, the bad guys would have broken in to steal my gun or I would have shot one of them. I don't know about you, but the idea of killing another person when you can get rid of them simply by yelling at them, doesn't appeal to me. I don't want to kill anyone. It's not part of my hero fantasy.

Actually, IMO from what you just said there you would be a prime owner. You Don't want to use it, so unless it is really needed you wont. Also you dislike for them means that it would be properly secured and not likely to fall into the wrong hands. However, I'll respect your opinion.


I've managed to defuse some bad situations (I stopped a guy in the next apartment from beating his girlfriend, for example) by not being afraid and using Jew-do and Jew-juitsu, the ability to use words instead of weapons. This has worked for me. Bad folks just don't mess with me in the first place.

Peace! Love! Rock 'n' Roll!

I actually forgot a couple of things that I would like to tell you.

First, my uncle has actually caught people cassing his house before. His solution was to polish the SKS on the front step. Nothing deters a criminal more than a 30 round magazine.

When I was 13 I had a random class mate attempt to kill me. This wasn't a normal everyday little fight but he actually meant to do me in. I honestly don't have a clue why he tried to do that either. That was the first time I had ever seen him and I had only gone to that school for about 2 days.

The fight was aweful, and I still have vision problems from where he hit me in the eye. I have scars on the back of my head from the skateboard he hit me with and just narrowly avoided his knife.

Durring the fight I disarmed him and we went down. I grabbed him by the back of the head and smashed his face into the concrete while he kicked me in the stomach from the awkward position I was holding him in. After a couple of minutes of this I think he nose was broken and I was spitting blood and had a bit leaking out of my ears and my right eye. His mom showed up and pulled him off of me and threw him in the car.

She cleaned him up and took him to a resturant, where he assulted another man in the bathroom. The other guy lived too, but I don't know how bad off he was.

Anyway, recovery from the fight was hell. I couldn't move for about two days without a lot of pain in my head and neck area, and my right eye hasn't ever been quite the same. I've got scarring in my mouth, on my head and stomach.

The last story I should have told, which had completely slipped my thought was this.

One night, while I was doing something or another (I'm an insomniac) I heard a sound outside. I grabbed my hunting spot light and shot it through the window at the noise. Outside were about a half a dozen men in my stepdads truck. I can tell you that If I had had a gun, not one of those guys would have gotten out of it. I was infuritated. They were driving a nice car, had nice clothes and here they were robbing us.

The men were eventually tracked down. They were your steriotyped druggie on welfare but suplementing it on the side folks. They aren't predominately (people on welfare) that type, but they do exist.

Anyway, when I spotlight them, they ran for it. A million candlepower putting your actions out for the world to see isn't too great of fun.

Oh, and if any one is wondering why I have a hunting spotlight and not a gun. I use my uncles.

hammerklavier
09-29-2009, 07:31 AM
icerose, the police officer was right, although, you could have just yelled out that you have a gun before firing and that would help you in a court of law also (if he kept trying to get in after being warned). The one thing I don't get... you said they tried again? What idiot would try again after being shot in the arm by a high-powered rifle?

Stijn Hommes
09-29-2009, 12:41 PM
Me and my family were robbed while on holiday in Hungary. While we were sleeping, some locals cut open our tent and took everything they could. Another camper likely saw the robbers, but was too scared to do anything. My younger sister heard them but thought it was my father. (Don't like to think about what would've happened if she got out of bed). When we woke up, we noticed more and more things that were missing, down to the towels we hung to dry outside. Now, I must admit, I was about 11-12 at the time; all I felt was anger. They had no right to take our stuff. But what got me even more is that they took my pocket knife which they could use to break into even more tents. I also felt sorry for two of the other campers. They had nothing left. Even their medicine had been stolen...

Rowan
09-29-2009, 03:15 PM
icerose, the police officer was right, although, you could have just yelled out that you have a gun before firing and that would help you in a court of law also (if he kept trying to get in after being warned). The one thing I don't get... you said they tried again? What idiot would try again after being shot in the arm by a high-powered rifle?

If there are any Castle law experts out there please weigh in as I'm curious re: this issue...BUT I think Icerose's shooting was well within the law (and the cop was out of line and subsequently fired per her post) --- Utah not only has a Castle Law (Doctrine) but also a Stand your Ground Law. To my knowledge it hasn't changed in recent years... I wish VA would adopt both!!! :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Doctrine_in_the_United_States
http://www.le.utah.gov/UtahCode/getCodeSection?code=76-2-402
http://www.le.utah.gov/UtahCode/getCodeSection?code=76-2-405



Utah has historically adhered to the principles of "stand your ground" without the need to refer to this new legislation. The use of deadly force to defend persons on one's own property is specifically permitted by Utah state law.[15] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Doctrine_in_the_United_States#cite_note-14) The law specifically states that a person does not have a duty to retreat[16] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Doctrine_in_the_United_States#cite_note-15) from a place where a person has lawfully entered or remained.



Stand-your-ground
Other states expressly relieve the home's occupants of any duty to retreat or announce their intent to use deadly force before they can be legally justified in doing so to defend themselves. Clauses that state this fact are called "Stand Your Ground", "Line In The Sand" or "No Duty To Retreat" clauses...

Tasmin21
09-29-2009, 05:12 PM
Luckily, we've never been robbed. But there was an incident the other night that seems relevant.

Weeks ago, we had to have some construction work done on the house. Shortly after that, we noticed hand/forehead prints in the dirt on the garage windows, like someone had been peering in. Then, more recently, we had to have some roofing work done. One of our more...questionable neighbors...came and knocked on the door one night (luckily hubby was home to deal with this douche) and asked if our roofers were hiring. (number one, how would we know, and number two, you're coming nowhere near my house, not even on the roof)

Regardless, I've been a bit edgy after this.

I was home alone at night with my six-year-old daughter, and I heard some noises in the basement. I was expecting the hubby home soon, but not THAT soon, so it put me on alert.

The first thing I did was arm myself. We have an extensive collection of swords, daggers, baseball bats, and other implements of destruction. There is at least one in every room, and not all of them are visible. I grabbed one of my daggers, then put my daughter in a room with only one door that I knew was clear.

Then I started flipping on every light we had, including the outside ones.

About that time, hubby called, and my first words to him were "where are you?" We quickly established that he was NOT in the basement. So I went hunting.

I cleared the basement and the garage, never did find anything. I thought about going outside to look around, have a listen, but I didn't want to unlock a door and leave a possible entry point.

I'm hoping that whatever I heard, it was one of the neighborhood vermin knocking around outside. (We have a large collection of raccoons and possums) If not, I will assume that all of the lights flaring on suddenly scared whoever it was off.

So, apparently, this is what my reaction is, when I think someone is coming into my house.

icerose
09-29-2009, 05:32 PM
icerose, the police officer was right, although, you could have just yelled out that you have a gun before firing and that would help you in a court of law also (if he kept trying to get in after being warned). The one thing I don't get... you said they tried again? What idiot would try again after being shot in the arm by a high-powered rifle?

I didn't ever say I was acting or thinking rationally. I think my rational side was scared to death and paralyzed while my instincts to protect myself and my baby were in full gear. I called my husband and not the police afterall and I didn't even ask for help.

Looking back I can't even tell you why I did that. I can't wrap my head around it. It came down to all I was thinking was If those bastards come in, they're getting shot. And that was about all there was to it. One was coming in, he got shot.

As to why they would try again, I have no idea, but it made it even worse. Knowing we had a gun, knowing I would use it, and still coming, that really bothers me. Maybe shooting him in the arm was my biggest mistake, if I had killed the idiot his friends would have known I was willing to kill. Perhaps it was because of the arm wound they were willing to try again, I don't know. I do know it has made me really jumpy and it's been 8 years since the incident. We now live in an apartment building on the second floor and the neighbors across the hall get drunk all the time and bump against the door and sometimes wiggle the knob thinking they have the right door and they don't. Everytime I hear that sound, I wake out of my sleep and my heart races and I'm mentally looking for my gun.

ETA: The cop wasn't fired because he told me I should have waited until the guys were inside to shoot and that I should shoot to kill. He was fired because it took him 20 minutes to drive up a block, twice. He was fired because he told my husband that I should be home, in danger and risk getting raped so they could arrest the guys for it.

Summonere
09-29-2009, 08:14 PM
I calmly pick up the phone and call my husband (Not the police because you know that would be logical)...

I have a suspicion that this happens frequently. For instance, a woman in town here phoned her husband who was working out of state, in Louisiana, when she heard what she thought was a burglar. This was around two-thirty in the morning. The burglar turned out to be a convicted sex offender. He stabbed the unfortunate woman to death and stole some credit cards.

ideagirl
09-29-2009, 08:53 PM
I think that my having a gun around the house means that I am in fear, expecting bad guys to come into my house and hurt me.

I've heard several people say that, and it mystifies me. Does having a burglar alarm mean you're in fear, expecting bad guys to come in and hurt you? Does having a fire extinguisher around the house mean that you're in fear, expecting a fire to start? To my mind, it's the same thing--it's just a precaution, like a fire extinguisher or a seatbelt or a burglar alarm.


I don't know about you, but the idea of killing another person when you can get rid of them simply by yelling at them, doesn't appeal to me. I don't want to kill anyone. It's not part of my hero fantasy.

Nobody (or should I say, no sane person) WANTS to kill someone or would prefer to kill when they could get rid of them simply by yelling. The point of a gun is when you CAN'T get rid of them simply by yelling--when the only way to save yourself is to shoot someone. It would really suck, to say the least, to be in that situation and NOT have a gun. That's not a hero fantasy, it's just about saving yourself (and sparing your family and friends the horror of you getting killed and/or raped).

Rowan
09-30-2009, 12:52 AM
So, apparently, this is what my reaction is, when I think someone is coming into my house.


Thank you! :)

Tsu Dho Nimh
09-30-2009, 02:35 PM
Has anyone been the victim of a burglary/break-in while you were at home? What went through your head? How did you react and what did you do? How did it make you feel, etc.? [I can only imagine how frightening this would be...]

I was going to sleep after a night shift, roomie was at sea, when I heard someone fumbling at the front door knob and the cats came flying into the bedroom and hid. This was not a good neighborhood, there had been burglaries, assaults and rapes withing the past month.

I grabbed the loaded pistol, clicked off the safety, and stepped out into the hallway as the door opened. Pistol was at waist level, aimed at the door. I was not feeling much of anything except I was coldly ready to shoot anyone I didn't know unless they turned and ran right back out the door. They were not going to get close enough to me to grab the pistol.

In walks my landlady, who was clearly snooping because she thought I was at work. For some reason she was looking at the floor, and didn't see me until I yelled "stop!" She stopped, staring at the pistol, kinda goggle-eyed.

I held the pistol steady, aimed at her, while we had a very short conversation about the dangers of sneaking into the apartment of a tenant who was armed and willing to shoot, the legal requirement to give us 72 hours notice before a non-emergency entry, and the need to knock before entering even for an emergency entry.

Had it been a stranger, who would have had to pick the lock to get in, I would have shot for the center of their torso and probably killed them.

Tsu Dho Nimh
09-30-2009, 02:48 PM
What idiot would try again after being shot in the arm by a high-powered rifle?

Uh ... the stoopid kind?

Rowan
10-01-2009, 02:58 AM
Many thanks to everyone who responded or PM'ed me. Your input is much appreciated. :)

Jeanette
10-02-2009, 01:55 AM
This happened to me back in December 2007.

So, I wake up on a Thursday morning around 7:00. I'm groggy -- Nyquil hangover coz I'm sick. My husband and daughter are still asleep beside me. I'm not going in to work so I trudge to the dining room, pluck my BlackBerry from my purse, and zombie my way back to the bedroom. I sit on the edge of the bed and gaze out the French doors at my backyard. Sun's up and high and I feel like crap.

So I'm BlackBerrying as best as I can and I hear the house alarm ding-ding (you know the sound -- when someone opens a door). Anyway, ding-ding and I look up from my PDA to see a man leaving our den. I can't see his face -- the sun is behind him and he is in shadow. Because I went to bed early and still a bit high on Nyquil, I ask my husband, "Honey, did my brother come over last night and stay over?"

My husband's all, "What the hell you talkin' bout?"

And the Nyquil curtain lifts and I shout, "OMG, someone was in the house!" My husband, dressed in his tightie-whities and a Clippers jersey hops out of bed and beats it out the house and down the street. I grab my 3-year old daughter and call 9-1-1.

The sheriffs come within 5 minutes. The helicopter does, too. In the end, the bad guy was never caught and made away with my laptop, a Nintendo DS, a PSP, a digital camera, a videocamera, my husband's Razr and my sense of safety. He came in through the only window that didn't have an alarm.

I totally forgot that I was sick - momma about to do a beat-down to protect my daughter had stepped in. I wasn't scared at first. Just pissed-the-hell off. I cried later but not with my daughter around. My daughter actually thought it was cool -- a few lady-deputies were there and she kept showing them her Barbies and asking if they wanted some of her cheese popcorn.

Since then, I automatically look down the hall at that window every time I wake up and trudge to the bedroom. We have lengths of PVC pipes in the window slides to keep them from opening. Since we're anti-gun, my husband purchased a bad-ass machete that we keep beneath the mattress.

It's that loss of privacy, that violation of my space that we'll never get back. That scary feeling that if this guy had a weapon, it may not have ended so well. It's crazy - while I was getting my BlackBerry, going about my regular day, this guy saw me in my own house, with my stuff in his arms. And nothing happened to me.

My faith in God was definitely strengthened because of this.

Hope this helps. Oh - one more thing. Just when we had started moving past that, the following January we get a huge telephone bill. I look at the bill and see all these porn sites. I'm about to GO OFF on my husband until I look at the date - December 13, the day the burglar stole the cell-phone. He had downloaded all this porn and music until we had AT&T disable the phone.

Rowan
10-02-2009, 03:05 AM
My daughter actually thought it was cool -- a few lady-deputies were there and she kept showing them her Barbies and asking if they wanted some of her cheese popcorn.
....
It's that loss of privacy, that violation of my space that we'll never get back. That scary feeling that if this guy had a weapon, it may not have ended so well. It's crazy - while I was getting my BlackBerry, going about my regular day, this guy saw me in my own house, with my stuff in his arms. And nothing happened to me.


Thank you, Jeanette. Your daughter's reaction made me chuckle (kids :) ). A common thread seems to be the loss of privacy / feeling of being violated which I expected. The fact you have an alarm and he still got in undetected is also scary!

Thanks again!

Canotila
10-02-2009, 12:27 PM
Both times I was house sitting for my aunt in the middle of nowhere, and both times her cowardly schutzhund reject german shepherd morphed into Cujo and saved me.

The first time someone actually got into the house. I panicked and slipped out a back door and ran to Candy's (the dog) pen and let her out. She was livid. Foaming at the mouth and snarling she streaked across the yard, into the house, and chased the trespasser out the back and into the swamp. I don't know if he got bitten. He didn't take anything. I had the cops come out and they triple checked every closet and under every bed to make sure no one else was hiding in there. I still had Candy sleep on the bed with me that night, ha ha. That guy was never caught.

The second time was a few years later. I was just doing yoga or something and someone outside in the darkness started twisting the doorknob and rattling it trying to get in. Candy turned into Cujo again and leaped at the window doing her best rip-your-face-off display. The rattling stopped and I called the cops. That was the most nerve wracking. I was shaking and sweaty and scared, whoever it was could easily see me through the giant glass windows and knew there was a girl home alone in the middle of nowhere.

It took the cops 45 minutes to get there both times. Longest 45 minutes of my life. Candy is gone now, but she is my hero. Funny thing about her is that she was terrified of men in uniform, so as soon as the cops showed up she would cower and pee herself in terror. They always looked at me like I was crazy when I told them she drove the burglar away.

CEtchison
10-02-2009, 06:38 PM
I thought I would reply only because my experience was quite different from everyone else's.

At the time, my husband was working out of state, returning home only every other weekend. I was home alone with our three girls, ages 7, 5 and 2 when the house alarm went off in middle of the night. I went to the alarm pad and all the lights were flashing. I grabbed all my girls, ran back to my room and put them on the bed. It was 2am so I wasn't thinking clearly and the girls crying didn't help.

The phone rang and it was the alarm company asking if everything was okay. I told them definitely not. The chick on the other end didn't seem to care. She told me which alarm sensor went off and I told her it was impossible because I was in that particular room. She then started arguing with me about the alarm source, the location, etc. She finally asked if she should send the police to investigate. I screamed "Yes! It is the middle of the night and I am home alone with three small children and we don't know what set off the alarm!" Instead of staying on the line until the police arrived... she hung up on me.

I was scared out of my mind. I tried calling my husband's cell phone repeatedly and he never heard it ringing since it was set to vibrate. Now I felt isolated in a city full of people. I felt like no one was going to help or gave a damn. I was afraid to stay in the house and I was afraid to leave the house.

Fourty five minutes had passed at this point. I finally called my father, two hours away, and he gave me the courage to go through the house. I went room by room while on the phone with him and realized that a picture frame had fallen from high on the wall and behind a dresser. The breaking glass in the frame set off the glass break sensors in the house.

The cops never did show up at my house.

I realize that I handled this entire situation poorly, which is surprising to me because I am typically one of those calm, cool and collected people. I've witnessed a number of car accidents, one deadly, and was able to remain calm throughout and even was able to fill out a detailed report afterwards.

But in this instance, I was a wreck. It wasn't so much fear for my life, but I was fearing for the lives of my children. I wasn't able to scoop them all up at once and run from the house. And since they were paralyzed in fear, I couldn't dare take two and leave one to sink or swim. It was the most terrible feeling that can't really be put into words. What is worse, is that I cannot honestly say that if it happened again, that I could or would be able to react differently.

Rowan
10-03-2009, 12:49 AM
The phone rang and it was the alarm company asking if everything was okay. I told them definitely not. The chick on the other end didn't seem to care. She told me which alarm sensor went off and I told her it was impossible because I was in that particular room. ...Instead of staying on the line until the police arrived... she hung up on me.

The cops never did show up at my house.

But in this instance, I was a wreck. It wasn't so much fear for my life, but I was fearing for the lives of my children. I wasn't able to scoop them all up at once and run from the house. And since they were paralyzed in fear, I couldn't dare take two and leave one to sink or swim. It was the most terrible feeling that can't really be put into words. What is worse, is that I cannot honestly say that if it happened again, that I could or would be able to react differently.

Wow, I hope you sent a scathing letter to your alarm company! I know exactly how you feel as that happened to me as well.... (false alarm) Having it happen in the middle of the night makes it that much worse as you are out of it anyway.

Thank you!

Rowan
10-03-2009, 12:50 AM
Both times I was house sitting for my aunt in the middle of nowhere, and both times her cowardly schutzhund reject german shepherd morphed into Cujo and saved me.

The first time someone actually got into the house. I panicked and slipped out a back door and ran to Candy's (the dog) pen and let her out. She was livid. Foaming at the mouth and snarling she streaked across the yard, into the house, and chased the trespasser out the back and into the swamp. I don't know if he got bitten. He didn't take anything. I had the cops come out and they triple checked every closet and under every bed to make sure no one else was hiding in there. I still had Candy sleep on the bed with me that night, ha ha. That guy was never caught.

The second time was a few years later. I was just doing yoga or something and someone outside in the darkness started twisting the doorknob and rattling it trying to get in. Candy turned into Cujo again and leaped at the window doing her best rip-your-face-off display. The rattling stopped and I called the cops. That was the most nerve wracking. I was shaking and sweaty and scared, whoever it was could easily see me through the giant glass windows and knew there was a girl home alone in the middle of nowhere.

It took the cops 45 minutes to get there both times. Longest 45 minutes of my life. Candy is gone now, but she is my hero. Funny thing about her is that she was terrified of men in uniform, so as soon as the cops showed up she would cower and pee herself in terror. They always looked at me like I was crazy when I told them she drove the burglar away.

She was tough when it counted! Thank you :)

maryland
10-03-2009, 02:09 AM
Living alone, England - I came home one winter eve, about 9p.m., a little terrace house. Went up the stairs to the toilet and, from the top stair, saw a man in the bathroom. For an instant, I thought it was my son who lived inthe next street and had a key.But this man was dressed in brown trousers and jumper. I realised that if I challenged him, he would run and push me down the box-staircase and life in a wheelchair would probably be the result. I ran back downstairs and across to a bakery where some men were working the night shift. He, meanwhile had jumped out of the bathroom window.
Phoned up police and (real) son.
About four police arrived, plus two with a dog, roaming around the garden. They were all cheerful and got in each others' way. Claimed he had climbed up the PLASTIC drainpipe and in the bathroom window and went off. Son and his wife made me a cup of tea. We knew something was wrong. Found that the sash window in the back living room had been slid open with a knife - and then shut again. The curtains had remained drawn. The washing on a stand had been carefully replaced- no trace of entry. He had, however not unlocked the back door and of course, the front door ( with my being out)was locked too. he had trappd himself- very dangerous for me/him. I phoned the police the next day and a fingerprint officer dusted graphite powder all over the windows and frames.Black dust eveywhere. "One woman sued us for damage to her property," he said, sadly.
Interesting point - the burglar had looked under the mattress, in the sideboard drawers, but had left the couple of shillings on a purse on the table.
"The burglaries go up in a neighbourhood when a dealer moves in nearby. They don't take stolen goods any more, too risky, they want cash," the officer said. "Leave the lights on when you go out," he advised. Forever afterwards, I look down streets and just see electric lights, in a possibly totally empty row of houses...
I actually felt sorry for the man, as well as being alienated from all my surroundings for some days. The walls of the house felt as though they did not exist, but belonged to the lawless "outside", anyone's property, anyones' use. I thought it was him sitting in the pedestrian underpass some weeks later - his eyes drifted away. He's been all through my house - it was an eerie, strange sensation, a forced intimacy. Too impossible to prove, I didn't go to the police about him. Installed extra window locks and left a light in the back room ever after. He's probably dead now from drugs.