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johnnysannie
09-22-2009, 06:59 PM
For my WIP, I have a question.

Do undercover officers inform the law enforcement officials where they are working undercover that they are there or do they remain unknown?

I have a situation where I want my undercover officer to be on the run from local law enforcment and be shot by them under the mistaken impression that he is a perp because they don't know who he is.

Is this either plausible or possible?

Sarpedon
09-22-2009, 07:01 PM
Unless they suspect that the local law enforcement is working for the mob or something, I'd say they WOULD inform them, just so things like that don't happen.

BigWords
09-22-2009, 07:12 PM
Administrative cock-ups happen everywhere, across many kinds of employment and with no-one to blame. You've surely heard the phrase "shit happens" before now, so I would completely buy the fact that an undercover police officer is shot in a 'friendly fire' situation as you describe. I can only imagine the kind of paperwork that the situation would need to get cleared up...

PeterL
09-22-2009, 07:20 PM
Not only is that plausible, but it has happened. The problem is with different organizations. Usually the problems happen because someone wants to have complete control, so he doesn't tell anyone that he has undercover agents around. Recently there was an item in the news where undercover state cops were trying to bust an undercover local cop. I don't remember whether anyone got hurt, but all of them were embarrassed.

icerose
09-22-2009, 10:28 PM
Yeah it happens most when you have outside agencies from what I understand.

DEA isn't going to run up to the local sheriff's station and tell them they have an undercover and give them a photo, ditto with every other agency.

It's not just control though, there's also problems with paid off cops.

Wayne K
09-22-2009, 10:44 PM
Depends on what agency they work for. F.B.I. rarely share with local law enforcement, D.E.A. is even less likely. State and local usually work together, unless, as mentioned, they suspect police are involved.

Police usually don't go undercover without State police knowing, but State police will do it without local cops knowing. One hand desn't usually know what the other is doing.

johnnysannie
09-22-2009, 10:51 PM
Thanks to all! This board came through for me again with accurate information and quick answers. Now I can use it in my WIP as I had hoped!

Kudos to you knowledgeable experts!

Rowan
09-23-2009, 01:44 AM
Depends on what agency they work for. F.B.I. rarely share with local law enforcement, D.E.A. is even less likely. State and local usually work together, unless, as mentioned, they suspect police are involved.

Police usually don't go undercover without State police knowing, but State police will do it without local cops knowing. One hand desn't usually know what the other is doing.

Actually, in my personal experience DEA is more likely to share w/local LE than FBI. DEA has a lot of task forces comprised of local LE members, etc. along with MET teams and the like; lot of interaction w/local LE. However, as has been stated by previous posters -- most agencies don't put up a red flag when it comes to UC ops but if a TF situation - more local PDs will have some knowledge of Op. :)

Johnnysannie: Hope that helps!

johnnysannie
09-23-2009, 04:00 AM
Actually, in my personal experience DEA is more likely to share w/local LE than FBI. DEA has a lot of task forces comprised of local LE members, etc. along with MET teams and the like; lot of interaction w/local LE. However, as has been stated by previous posters -- most agencies don't put up a red flag when it comes to UC ops but if a TF situation - more local PDs will have some knowledge of Op. :)

Johnnysannie: Hope that helps!

It does, thanks!

Stijn Hommes
09-23-2009, 01:11 PM
Administrative cock-ups happen everywhere, across many kinds of employment and with no-one to blame. You've surely heard the phrase "shit happens" before now, so I would completely buy the fact that an undercover police officer is shot in a 'friendly fire' situation as you describe. I can only imagine the kind of paperwork that the situation would need to get cleared up... I don't see how an undercover cop could get hit by friendly fire. If he doesn't shoot, there's no reason to shoot him. Cops need a good reason to drop in guns blazing...

RJK
09-23-2009, 06:14 PM
Cops working undercover DO NOT advertise to anyone that they are working an area. Many officers work long term assignments outside their hometown. Others work within the county, but in another city or town. Some are known to the regular officers, but many are not.
Undercover cops working gangs, can get caught up in fire fights where they could be shot. The cops, in cases like that, won't bother to ensure that the guy isn't shooting back, they'll see a dirt bag among many who are shooting at them, and shoot.
I've been on the undercover end of a raid. Luckily, no one started shooting. I raised my hands and played like a bad guy, like all the rest of them. One of the uniformed cops knew me, but thankfully, didn't say anything to give me away.

BigWords
09-24-2009, 02:48 AM
I don't see how an undercover cop could get hit by friendly fire. If he doesn't shoot, there's no reason to shoot him. Cops need a good reason to drop in guns blazing...

And every person ever shot by a police officer in the history of policing was acting in a manner that warranted their gunshot. Puh-lease. You have more confidence in the competence of human beings than anyone really should.

An overworked, exhausted officer in a dimly-lit street sees a person turning and... What? The obvious answer is they will open fire on the person. They are human, and subject to the same flaws as everyone else.