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View Full Version : Dan Brown sells 1 million in 1 day



Cyia
09-17-2009, 10:15 PM
The Lost Symbol (http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/09/16/dan-browns-lost-symbol-sells-1-million-copies-in-the-first-day/?partner=rss&emc=rss) hit, then flew off shelves. Over 1 million hardback and e-book sales.

A good sign or just part of a singular frenzy?

MsGneiss
09-17-2009, 10:18 PM
I don't know that this translates to good news for anyone other than Dan Brown and the people directly associated with producing the book.

Darzian
09-17-2009, 10:24 PM
I'm encouraged by the fact that so many books are still selling, regardless of the author. Periodic highlights such as LOTR, HP, Twilight and now The Lost Symbol help revive reader interest in various genres.

IMO, it's good for the the entire writing and publishing community in general.

MattW
09-17-2009, 10:29 PM
More people read, more books sell, more midlist authors that can be backed. Same goes for books "authored" by celebrities.

I didn't buy it, I may read it when the library waiting list is less that one hundred people.

Alpha Echo
09-17-2009, 10:31 PM
Selling books is good. Good for Dan Brown. I didn't buy it and probably won't, but I may read it one day.

maestrowork
09-17-2009, 10:46 PM
It's the result of Da Vinci Code and Angels&Demons, but the book has to stand on its own, too. It's good for him, and good for the industry. But I doubt I will be reading it.

In comparison, Rowling sold 8 million copies of DH in one day. So Dan Brown still has some catching up to do.

katiemac
09-17-2009, 10:51 PM
But he did break the record for release day sales for adult fiction.

Calla Lily
09-17-2009, 10:56 PM
I hope that the money his publishers are raking in will translate into a few deals for first-time writers. The pub will have the extra cash. Sort of like those celebrity tell-alls.

A gal can hope. :D

jennifer75
09-17-2009, 11:06 PM
Selling books is good. Good for Dan Brown. I didn't buy it and probably won't, but I may read it one day.

You can borrow my copy, when I get one. ;)

maestrowork
09-17-2009, 11:14 PM
If anything, it has restored my belief that people still read.

$1 million ~= $20M in sales and that's like a good WEEKEND for a movie. This is one-day sale.

JeanneTGC
09-17-2009, 11:14 PM
Per every editor I've spoken with, sales like this are vital to keeping the industry going overall. The more money the publisher makes on Dan Brown's book, the more opportunity they have to buy books from new and mid-list authors.

So, go Dan Brown!

ejwriter
09-18-2009, 07:06 AM
when i went to pick up my copy (yes, i like dan brown. no, i don't want to debate it), i was so encouraged to see people walk into the store, walk straight up to the display full of his books, pick one up (clearly there just for that book), then plunge deeper into the store to find more books! it was lovely. :e2cloud9:

some folks just don't think to book-shop until there's that one book they've been waiting for. then, once they're at the store, they remember: 'oh yeah! i like books!' and they buy more.
so any book that gets people into the stores is fine by me.:Sun:

C.bronco
09-18-2009, 07:17 AM
It's nice to know that someone who was selling books out of his car made it this far.

narnia
09-18-2009, 07:50 AM
I'm happy for him and the boost his book is doing for the industry. I enjoyed DVC and can't wait to read The Lost Symbol .

(Thanks in advance Mom for the Christmas gift! :) It will be my reward for meeting a deadline.).

Exir
09-18-2009, 09:55 AM
Don't like Dan Brown's writing style, but glad that an author is selling so well in such an economic climate.

Besides, Dan Brown fans are so much more intelligent than Twilight fangirls.

*ducks*

Chuck Jones
09-18-2009, 10:37 AM
I'm not so big on Dan Brown's writing style, but I'm glad to see his book selling so well. I will probably read it eventually just for the hell of it.

A. Hamilton
09-18-2009, 10:40 AM
I work for a Costco vendor and saw this book in many carts when I worked last (Tuesday I think).

dpaterso
09-18-2009, 10:40 AM
Go Dan! You rule!


Besides, Dan Brown fans are so much more intelligent than Twilight fangirls.
Are not! <hugs teddy bear with Bella's photo pasted on head>

-Derek

blacbird
09-18-2009, 10:51 AM
Periodic highlights such as LOTR, HP, Twilight and now The Lost Symbol help revive reader interest in various genres.

Broadly categorized, every one of these works is in the same big genre: Fantasy.

I'll leave it up to others to assess the meaning of that.

caw

Exir
09-18-2009, 12:37 PM
Broadly categorized, every one of these works is in the same big genre: Fantasy.

Except Twilight, which is in an even bigger genre: Sparkly

*ducks*

Cassiopeia
09-18-2009, 12:44 PM
I think it's fabulous. Not only for the industry but I loved Angels and Demons. DaVinci code was enjoyable but not as much as A & D for me. I'm excited to read it.

C.M. Daniels
09-18-2009, 02:25 PM
Good thing the first print run was something like 5 million copies.

That's a lot of books for a single day.

JJ Cooper
09-18-2009, 03:13 PM
I'm an author who benefits from Dan Brown sales. Both in store and through sharing the same publisher. Go Dan.

JJ

Phaeal
09-18-2009, 04:59 PM
But he did break the record for release day sales for adult fiction.

Meh. Harry Potter may officially reside in the children's ghetto (nice luxurious ghetto, these days), but it's definitely crossover. Why else would Bloomsbury publish alternative editions with "adult" covers?

Speaking as one of many adults unaccompanied by children who attended the midnight release party.

Phaeal
09-18-2009, 05:04 PM
:e2cloud9:

some folks just don't think to book-shop until there's that one book they've been waiting for. then, once they're at the store, they remember: 'oh yeah! i like books!' and they buy more.
so any book that gets people into the stores is fine by me.:Sun:

I noticed the other day at Borders that they had loaded the front tables with several Brownesque puzzlebox thrillers. So the hope for impulse extra-Brown sales was evidently high.

Brownian. The Brown-meister. Mr. Brown-man.

Just had to get the rest of the Brownisms out of my system.

;)

Phaeal
09-18-2009, 05:16 PM
Don't like Dan Brown's writing style, but glad that an author is selling so well in such an economic climate.

Besides, Dan Brown fans are so much more intelligent than Twilight fangirls.

*ducks*

Don't see much difference. Which is why I'm working on a paranormal thriller in which a clumsy yet universally adored professor of symbology falls for an aloof yet alluring yet snarky yet tortured beautiful vampire babe who has twelve hours to discover the ancient manuscript secreted by the Masons and Templars in some church- and museum-ridden major city where it rains a lot which would allow all vampires to rid themselves of the sparkly curse. Meanwhile, self-mutilating werewolves connected to Opus Dei will stop at nothing to, um, stop them!

Phaeal
09-18-2009, 05:19 PM
Oh, and it's cool that lots of copies of this book are selling, especially if they drag other books to the cash register as well. And if people stop to have a latte in the cafe while they're there. And maybe a nice piece of pumpkin spice loaf cake.

Ka-ching!

sommemi
09-18-2009, 05:37 PM
mmmmmmm. LOAF CAKE....

MGraybosch
09-18-2009, 07:14 PM
More power to him.

Albedo
09-18-2009, 07:20 PM
Is there a plot summary up on Wikipedia yet? I might read that. :)

narnia
09-18-2009, 07:38 PM
Is there a plot summary up on Wikipedia yet? I might read that. :)

Not sure but you can read an excerpt here:

http://www.parade.com/news/2009/09/13-dan-brown-the-lost-symbol.html

Red-Green
09-18-2009, 07:41 PM
Oh, and it's cool that lots of copies of this book are selling, especially if they drag other books to the cash register as well. And if people stop to have a latte in the cafe while they're there. And maybe a nice piece of pumpkin spice loaf cake.

Ka-ching!

That's what I think. Get somebody in a book store, maybe they don't buy just the one book...because I can't be the only person physically incapable of buying a single book.

Darzian
09-18-2009, 07:47 PM
That's what I think. Get somebody in a book store, maybe they don't buy just the one book...because I can't be the only person physically incapable of buying a single book.

Ya know, that bolded part can be interpreted in two ways. :D

seun
09-18-2009, 09:20 PM
Our copies arrived at work yesterday. I tore the last page out of each one. :evil

scarletpeaches
09-18-2009, 09:29 PM
This doesn't tell me loads of people are reading. This tells me loads of people are buying.

Besides, even if people do read this book, so what? I'd only be happy if they moved on to better books. Like Twilight.

(Just for you, dpaterso. I know no-one loves Bella like you do).

scarletpeaches
09-18-2009, 09:52 PM
I'm not a fan of Philip Pullman; at times he's seemed like the Dawkins of the YA-lit world to me. Nevertheless, here's an interesting article (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/6198473/Dan-Browns-most-scathing-review-comes-from-fellow-author-Philip-Pullman.html).

katiemac
09-18-2009, 10:45 PM
Meh. Harry Potter may officially reside in the children's ghetto (nice luxurious ghetto, these days), but it's definitely crossover. Why else would Bloomsbury publish alternative editions with "adult" covers?

Not denying Potter's crossover (hence the 8 million first day sales), but the records will say Dan Brown has the highest first day sales for adult fiction. Rowling holds the record for highest first day sales ever.

blacbird
09-18-2009, 11:37 PM
I have no objection whatever to Dan Brown's success. Or envy of it. Ditto Stephanie Meyer or J.K. Rowling or any other trendy mega-success bestseller writer.

Dan Brown gets a lot of flak over his writing "style", which I gather from the comments of many people, comes off as clumsy at best. But I haven't read any of his stuff, so can't really comment on that, either. It does, however, bring up some questions:

Why does it matter? Why do we here put so much angst into issues of "craft"? Does any reader really give a rat's about POV, narrative tense, use of adverbs, redundancy, etc.? Are there writing gods sitting around laughing at us all day for being concerned, yea, obsessed with such trivia? I get the sense that Dan Brown isn't much concerned with that kind of stuff. Nor are his agent and publisher.

So why should we be?

caw

Toothpaste
09-19-2009, 12:09 AM
So why should we be?

caw

I believe story trumps all. And perseverance and luck have a great deal to do with huge success. BUT. Just because story trumps all does not mean that therefore we all must start writing badly. The good news is that a wonderfully well written book with an awesome story can do just as well as that poorly written book with an awesome story. It isn't that bad writing is preferred, it's just that it doesn't seem to matter that much to the layman. So. Then. You as an author have to decide for yourself what matters.

Whatever I do, be it writing, acting or friggin' data entry, I do it with the goal of doing my job as best as I can. The reason I do that is because if I don't, I don't enjoy it. It's very very selfish of me, I know.

If I'm on stage and have no lines, I could very well pretty much just stand there, nod a few times, and be done with it. But if I do that, I get bored very quickly, the time seems interminable. If I stand on stage in a scene where I have no lines but am still 100% in character, reacting to what's going on as I think my character would, despite the fact that chances are only maybe two people in the audience are going to notice me, the time passes far more quickly, I have much more fun playing make-believe, and those two people who did notice will appreciate the effort I put in.

The same goes with writing. I like fast paced stories. I write fast paced stories. But I couldn't just write a story without trying my darndest to write it well. I want to write a story that, I hope at any rate, has musicality to the language, that's interesting and unique. Why should I bother writing otherwise? Most kids who read my books have no clue whether they are well written or not, they find them funny, they stay up late trying to finish them, and they think some of the characters are cool. Heck so do many of the parents. But then there are one or two teachers/parents/reviewers/other who see the effort I've put into the book. Get the little nuanced moments, the references, the attention to word choice, and they appreciate it.

We debate and debate what makes a good story, we ask ourselves why do some fools top the bestseller lists when they so clearly don't understand the first thing about writing. We ask ourselves what's the point in even trying. After a while, those questions become dull, the debate tired.

Write what you want to write. Care about what you want to care about. Write to your own level of excellence, whatever that is. Because the alternative seems utterly pointless to me.

scarletpeaches
09-19-2009, 12:28 AM
So why should we be?

cawBecause anything else is just settling. That might be good enough for you, but it has never been, nor ever will be, good enough for me.

To quote Oprah (sorry): "Now that you know better, do better."

McCaw.

narnia
09-19-2009, 01:17 AM
I believe story trumps all. And perseverance and luck have a great deal to do with huge success. BUT. Just because story trumps all does not mean that therefore we all must start writing badly. The good news is that a wonderfully well written book with an awesome story can do just as well as that poorly written book with an awesome story. It isn't that bad writing is preferred, it's just that it doesn't seem to matter that much to the layman. So. Then. You as an author have to decide for yourself what matters.

Whatever I do, be it writing, acting or friggin' data entry, I do it with the goal of doing my job as best as I can. The reason I do that is because if I don't, I don't enjoy it. It's very very selfish of me, I know.

If I'm on stage and have no lines, I could very well pretty much just stand there, nod a few times, and be done with it. But if I do that, I get bored very quickly, the time seems interminable. If I stand on stage in a scene where I have no lines but am still 100% in character, reacting to what's going on as I think my character would, despite the fact that chances are only maybe two people in the audience are going to notice me, the time passes far more quickly, I have much more fun playing make-believe, and those two people who did notice will appreciate the effort I put in.

The same goes with writing. I like fast paced stories. I write fast paced stories. But I couldn't just write a story without trying my darndest to write it well. I want to write a story that, I hope at any rate, has musicality to the language, that's interesting and unique. Why should I bother writing otherwise? Most kids who read my books have no clue whether they are well written or not, they find them funny, they stay up late trying to finish them, and they think some of the characters are cool. Heck so do many of the parents. But then there are one or two teachers/parents/reviewers/other who see the effort I've put into the book. Get the little nuanced moments, the references, the attention to word choice, and they appreciate it.

We debate and debate what makes a good story, we ask ourselves why do some fools top the bestseller lists when they so clearly don't understand the first thing about writing. We ask ourselves what's the point in even trying. After a while, those questions become dull, the debate tired.

Write what you want to write. Care about what you want to care about. Write to your own level of excellence, whatever that is. Because the alternative seems utterly pointless to me.

That is exactly how I feel as well. We are all not made alike, nor do we all write alike. If my best is only mezzo soprano no matter how much I practice and try to train my voice, then that is my best and who is to say that I am lacking if I am successful as a mezzo soprano because I lack the skills to hit the higher notes? If Dan Brown/Stephanie Meyer/<insert author name here> can tell a rollicking good story but has trouble with the mechanics, well then perhaps that is his best and I for one would rather read a rolllicking good story with some mechanical issues than one that is technically perfect but works better as a doorstop.

We all read for different reasons. I read mainly to be entertained, to get sucked into another world and enjoy the ride while I am buried in the pages. If a book does that for me, I am more inclined to forgive the missteps here and there.

JMVHO

narnia
09-19-2009, 01:22 AM
Because anything else is just settling. That might be good enough for you, but it has never been, nor ever will be, good enough for me.

To quote Oprah (sorry): "Now that you know better, do better."

McCaw.

You know I adore you Scarlet, but I would respectfully disagree because one person's best may not be another's. We all have our own unique skill level, and at some point no amount of practice can make us better. I don't see that as settling, I see it as the natural way of things.

I may know better, but that does not mean it is always within my power do actually do better. All we can do is strive to do our best, and comparing our best to anyone else's is often counterproductive.

:Sun:

scarletpeaches
09-19-2009, 01:24 AM
If you know better (as in, this sentence is grammatically incorrect and that one is not), then yes, it is in your power to 'do' better. One person's best is not another's, that's true, but when it comes to writing we all have the capacity to improve. God knows what I write this year is better than the crap I came out with years ago. What I write tomorrow will be better than what I wrote today (especially as I'm spaced out on painkillers again). If you know better and refuse to write to that level, then yes, you are settling. Practise will always make one better for as long as we're literate. (In Brown's case, I have to say that's questionable, though...)

Delhomeboy
09-19-2009, 01:25 AM
While I agree that story trumps all, I will say that bad mechanics and writing skill will, sometimes, knock people out of the story. I'd say that happens less and less these days with a society tht iz ust 2 reding lik tis, but for me, it still occurs, and is probably the sole reason that I simply could not read the Twilight series, despite my best efforts for my sister's sake.

Susan Gable
09-19-2009, 01:25 AM
I hope that the money his publishers are raking in will translate into a few deals for first-time writers. The pub will have the extra cash. Sort of like those celebrity tell-alls.

A gal can hope. :D

I think, in general, celebrity tell-alls get gigantic advances, which they don't earn out.

Where writers like Dan Brown, Stephen King, Nora Roberts, etc. more than likely earn-out the advances they get. (Or come damn close to it.)

Susan G. - who reminds everyone that even books that don't earn-out can still make a profit for a publisher. <G>

cptwentworth
09-19-2009, 01:27 AM
*Shame-faced* I need to get out more, I've never heard of him.

Delhomeboy
09-19-2009, 01:27 AM
*Shame-faced* I need to get out more, I've never heard of him.
...........

I........

..........

badducky
09-19-2009, 01:32 AM
Personally, I'm always happy to see anyone in the do that well when they sit in a cave, making stuff up. (A palatial cave, with gilded, ornate ceilings, and a moat with sharks with frikkin' lasers on them to keep out the crazier fans in his case...) Still, here's an interesting article found courtesy of Victoria Strauss' Twitter Feed:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/6188201/Dan-Browns-The-Lost-Symbol-sparks-supermarket-price-war.html

katiemac
09-19-2009, 01:37 AM
Personally, I'm always happy to see anyone in the do that well when they sit in a cave, making stuff up. (A palatial cave, with gilded, ornate ceilings, and a moat with sharks with frikkin' lasers on them to keep out the crazier fans in his case...) Still, here's an interesting article found courtesy of Victoria Strauss' Twitter Feed:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/6188201/Dan-Browns-The-Lost-Symbol-sparks-supermarket-price-war.html

That happened, as the article said, with the Potter books too. Small and independent bookstores can't afford to buy the books in bulk like the chains, so they similarly can't afford to slash the prices as much.

Kitty27
09-19-2009, 02:07 AM
Go Dan Brown!


You da man!

TerzaRima
09-19-2009, 02:52 AM
So why should we be?


I dunno, evidence of the collective lack of taste doesn't depress you a little? Maybe I need to watch those Cymbalta commercials a little more closely.

MGraybosch
09-19-2009, 05:23 AM
*Shame-faced* I need to get out more, I've never heard of him.

Be grateful.

Cassiopeia
09-19-2009, 05:25 AM
I dunno, evidence of the collective lack of taste doesn't depress you a little? Maybe I need to watch those Cymbalta commercials a little more closely.
Have you SEEN the possible side effects? If I'm ever diagnosed with depression I think I'll just say no and go find another way out of the darkness. :D

MGraybosch
09-19-2009, 05:32 AM
Have you SEEN the possible side effects? If I'm ever diagnosed with depression I think I'll just say no and go find another way out of the darkness. :D

I recommend getting drunk and listening to Queensryche. That always worked for me.

sydney
09-19-2009, 06:22 AM
Let's tone it down...

I admit Dan Brown isn't the best writer but his books are interesting page-turners.
People like to read his books and they shell out the money for them.
We all want to publish books and he's helping the industry.
:)

I saw something about Philip Pullman and I just wanted to say I loved his DM trilogy. When I read them I was too young to fully understand them (my memory can barely recall what happened lol) but I was intrigued and had fun.
I like Dawkins too lol...

Salis
09-19-2009, 06:27 AM
I dunno, evidence of the collective lack of taste doesn't depress you a little? Maybe I need to watch those Cymbalta commercials a little more closely.

Watching the Town Hall meetings depresses me a hell of a lot more than some vague argument about good taste.

blacbird
09-19-2009, 07:18 AM
I admit Dan Brown isn't the best writer but his books are interesting page-turners.

As I've said elsewhere, I haven't read any of Brown's books. But I also have to say, if I hit more than about three of those sentences in the linked article, I damn sure would have turned the pages, including the cover, shut. And looked for a better book.

caw

CDaniel
09-19-2009, 08:01 AM
The plain fact of the matter is that some people are going to like this book and some are not.

Everyone is intitled to their own opinion about an author's work. Whether they like his style of writing or not, and so on.

Personally I like the stories that Dan Brown writes, and I agree with some others here that the record sells of his latest book is a boost for this industry which many of us are striving to break into.