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View Full Version : Anybody have an Embolic Stroke?



DrZoidberg
09-13-2009, 02:19 PM
I've studied the medical part of having an embolic stroke. I know what happens and why. I know the symptoms. I know the side effects and I know the rehabilitation involved. I've even read a large number of diaries.

What I need now is one or more personal accounts. How did it feel? When did you regain consciousness? What was your first thoughts when you awoke? Apart from great pain, how did you feel when the embolic stroke first hit? How did you deal with the loss of physical function, both practically and emotionally?

I have interviewed one man who has had this, but it was long ago. He doesn't quite remember the details of his emotional states.

In short the book is a family comedy/drama or sorts. The stroke happens toward the end of the book. The stroke is a part of a live-each-day-as-if-it-is-your-last premise. And that it's easy to say how one would deal with a particular adversity, until it actually happens.

If you've had a stroke or know any resources I might use, any help would be much appreciated.

Libbie
09-14-2009, 03:15 AM
This question in combination with your forum name scares me!

DrZoidberg
09-14-2009, 11:57 AM
This question in combination with your forum name scares me!

It's nothing to worry about. I think you only have a minor infection in your anterior tentacles. Take two aspirin and call me in the morning.

GeorgeK
09-14-2009, 11:29 PM
"Young man, I'm very familiar with human physiology and I assure you that the problem is in your ovaries."

Now that that is out of the way, much like your anterior tentacles...

From the patient's standpoint there is no difference between an embolic stroke, a hemmoragic stroke or an thrombolic one. The Central Nervous System symptoms are all the same and are the result of compromised blood flow to whatever part of the brain you are talking apart. It's the part of the brain that is affected, moreso than what caused it that generates the CNS symptoms. From the patients' standpoint the different histories would be relevant to determining the preceding problem, or what caused the stroke.

DrZoidberg
09-15-2009, 11:01 AM
From the patient's standpoint there is no difference between an embolic stroke, a hemmoragic stroke or an thrombolic one. The Central Nervous System symptoms are all the same and are the result of compromised blood flow to whatever part of the brain you are talking apart. It's the part of the brain that is affected, moreso than what caused it that generates the CNS symptoms. From the patients' standpoint the different histories would be relevant to determining the preceding problem, or what caused the stroke.

What I'm interested in how a person suffering from a stroke perceives the world. I understand that they are scared, but I need more information than that. Assuming they are conscious, do they understand what is happening? How little can a person with aphasic symptoms understand of the world other than just words? Or is it only confusing?

More importantly I need to know what kinds of things the people at the scene of the accident and hospital are likely to say. Both staff and patient. I know what they do, it's the emotions I'm trying to get at.

Any nurses in the house? Doctors? If you don't feel like telling the world please PM me! You'll have my eternal and undying gratitude.

GeorgeK
09-15-2009, 04:08 PM
It really depends upon the part of the brain that is affected. Some people will be mentally alert enough to know that suddenly this or that part of their body is not doing what it should be. Others will be too confused to be scared. Strokes do all sorts of things from sudden paralysis to people forgetting that they have a left or right side of their body.

"Where's my wedding ring?"
"What are you talking about? You are wearing it."
"No I'm not, see!" (raises right hand)
"No, look it's on your other hand."
"That's not my hand."

If you avoid mentioning what parts of the brain are affected, you could do almost anything.

DrZoidberg
09-15-2009, 05:52 PM
It really depends upon the part of the brain that is affected. Some people will be mentally alert enough to know that suddenly this or that part of their body is not doing what it should be. Others will be too confused to be scared. Strokes do all sorts of things from sudden paralysis to people forgetting that they have a left or right side of their body.

"Where's my wedding ring?"
"What are you talking about? You are wearing it."
"No I'm not, see!" (raises right hand)
"No, look it's on your other hand."
"That's not my hand."

If you avoid mentioning what parts of the brain are affected, you could do almost anything.

So I've gathered. But I think I could do that anyway. The localizationist model seems to be out of vogue nowadays.

I think still would prefer to get a genuine report of how it feels.

DrZoidberg
10-05-2009, 01:39 PM
I just thought I'd bump this. I've done tonnes of research, but still nobody to interview. Either a nurse or doctor with stroke patients, or a former patient. Does anybody know somebody to interview. Somebody with experience of aphasia would also be very valuable.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.