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mrs75
07-06-2005, 08:40 PM
I'm doing some research, your help would be very much appreciated.

What I need is some home cleaning tips. Is there a way that you make air fresheners for your home, something you use to remove a stain, etc... Example of what I'm looking for, Using used dryer tosses to dust with.

Please post any home cleaning tips you have.

Thanks in advance.

Stephanie
07-06-2005, 08:59 PM
:ROFL:Sorry, I put myself in your shoes for a sec - writing a "how to clean your house" article. I'd have to file mine under "fiction".

However, my MIL is a neat-freak and one thing she's always done that's strange but true--she sweeps the carpet. She's got a broom with iron-like bristles and it honestly does a much better job at picking up pet hair and dust than vacuum cleaners.

(I, on the other hand, open my windows on windy days) :roll:

PVish
07-06-2005, 09:05 PM
White vinegar is great for removing stains from a carpet.

Baking soda deodorizes carpets. Sprinkle, let sit for a while, then vacuum. Good to sprinkle inside smelly sneakers, too. Also good kitty litter deodorant.

To remove cat hair from the computer keyboard, fold a post-it note in half so the sticky side is out. Run that edge between the keys. Hair sticks to the sticky part.

MacAllister
07-06-2005, 09:51 PM
two words:

Floor drains.

maestrowork
07-06-2005, 11:04 PM
Club soda takes out pet stains on upholsteries...

Then there's Shop Vac (at least for the guys) and Windex... that's all you need.

Unique
07-06-2005, 11:22 PM
When the clutter gets out of hand, I invite my friends over for a party. Great motivating force to get the job done.

SeanDSchaffer
07-08-2005, 07:20 AM
When I was a Janitor years ago, we would dust off furniture and stuff using ordinary rags slightly dampened with simple water. It worked just as good as did Pledge or Endust or any other dusting spray. (I use the sprays at home these days, simply because they smell good, and because they shine up wooden surfaces better than does water. But for basic dusting, a rag slightly dampened with water is all you really need.)

On a related note, my Aunt Lena used to use old worn bathrags for dusting, instead of fancy specialized dusting rags you find packaged together at the local store. They worked just as good for her as do the fancier store-bought versions but are more readily available and cost less.

Also, one of my neighbors used to use liquid dish detergent to mop her floor with. It worked just as good for her as would Pine-Sol or something to that effect, but cost quite a bit less as she used the grocery store's own brand.

Fern
07-08-2005, 06:38 PM
Word of caution about using liquid dishwashing soap to mop with --- speaking from experience, having busted my rear more than once after using it . . .

On some lineoleums it will make it slicker than snot. Always follow it with a clear water rinse with a little vinegar in it to strip the "soapy" film.

DTNg
07-19-2005, 04:06 AM
Vinegar is great for cleaning and freshening the air. Dryer sheets are a great way to freshen drawers and closets and removing the musty smell. Baking soda is a wonderful carpet deodorizer too. I have many such tips, household hints are a specialty of mine. Feel free to contact me if you still are looking for assistance.

deborahng@gmail.com

Rabe
07-19-2005, 06:42 AM
It may sound funny, but tabasco sauce can be a great cleaner for tile, grout and concrete.

I discovered this once after I dropped a case of it on concrete and went to mop it up. Cleanest I'd ever seen that bit of floor! Of course, though, it was only that bit that the tabasco sauce was on which made an interesting pattern.

I'm sure you already know about toothpaste for silver polishing.

I read a tip somewhere were you could put shaving cream on your bathroom mirror and then wipe it off until there's just a film left...supposed to help defog the mirror. Didn't work out so well for me though, but then again, I'm not sure if it was becuase the tip is bogus or the type of shaving cream I used.

Rabe...

DTNg
07-19-2005, 07:21 PM
One of my favorites - Use mayonaise to remove water marks from wood furniture.

Also, if you spill red wine on your carpet or clothes, chase with a glass of white wine. This will neutralize the stain.

sassandgroove
07-21-2005, 01:48 AM
Also, one of my neighbors used to use liquid dish detergent to mop her floor with. It worked just as good for her as would Pine-Sol or something to that effect, but cost quite a bit less as she used the grocery store's own brand.

I found this out when I used Dawn in the dishwasher. Umm...not a good idea. Dish soap and dish washer machine liquid are not the same! Suds spilled out of the dishwasher endlessly! I mopped it up and had one shiny floor, and one heck of a silly story.

Oh, a housecleaning tip,

Use vinegar and baking soda in a slow drain. Leave it overnight and rinse thourougly. A lot cheaper than drano, but not as fast.

l.stormgaye
07-21-2005, 01:50 AM
Hire a sexy nanny...she'll polish your husband's knobs.


http://michaelhodges.com/stuff/funny/2008cc1.swf (http://michaelhodges.com/stuff/funny/2008cc1.swf)

ideagirl
07-21-2005, 03:20 AM
In case no one's mentioned this already, you can cut your use of laundry detergent in half by using baking soda. Just use half the normal amount of detergent, and then, for a full load, 1/2 cup baking soda. Reduce the amount of baking soda proportionally for smaller loads. If you use liquid detergent, put the baking soda in at the beginning; if you use powdered, put it in during the rinse cycle. If the clothes are truly filthy, use borax instead of baking soda.

Credit where credit is due: I got this from a book called "Clean House, Clean Planet: Clean your house for pennies a day the safe, nontoxic way" by Karen Logan. I only bought the book a couple of days ago, so this is the only tip in it that I've tried. It works! The clothes are just as clean as if I'd used the full amount of detergent!

Nicholas S.H.J.M Woodhouse
07-21-2005, 03:25 AM
chop a potato and put the inside (the non-skin part) against any dirty window.

Patricia
07-21-2005, 04:24 AM
Use dampened Q-tips to get into those hard to reach nooks and crannies that most dust cloths and brushes cannot reach. I am fortunate in that I can now have help with the house cleaning. Think I can get the cleaning persons to use my trick? Nope! I find myself still every so often going about doing the "detailed dusting."

Good luck with your article or book!

DTNg
07-21-2005, 04:42 AM
Dryer sheets are great for removing soap scum from shower walls and doors. It's best to clean as soon as the shower is over while the walls are still wet. If not dampen a dryer sheet and wipe soap scum away.

l.stormgaye
07-21-2005, 06:20 PM
This is the best cleaning solution by far.

Maryn
07-24-2005, 02:02 AM
Our house is a mess, cluttered with books and shoes and newspapers and sometimes dirty under the clutter as well.

And you know what? I don't care. My husband and kids are never going to reminisce about that time the counter shone like glass, how their socks never picked up hair when they walked across the carpet, or how dust-free living felt.

They'll remember kick-*** homemade Halloween costumes and prom dresses, movies and popcorn at least once a week starting at age 8 (and not just kid movies, either!), learning together how to make pizza from scratch, only the pepperoni pre-packaged, and a mom who had time to read to them by the hour, lie on our stomachs examining ants or on our backs for clouds, painting bedrooms any color they chose, and lots more.

A clean house is no competition.

Maryn

Edit to add: That said, I do have a household tip which I forgot, so wrapped up in my little rant did I become! (Oops.) We inherited silver and it is pretty when it's polished. Line a shallow pan with aluminum foil and fill with water, adding one tablespoon of baking soda per two cups of water. Heat to 150F, and lay the silverware in the pan, making sure it touches the foil. The tarnish will disappear (theoretically) or lighten (reality). Especially good for tableware (spoons and such) and ornate trim on edges, lids, and handles. Use a really big pot and you can even do pitchers and serving pieces.

Rabe
07-27-2005, 06:41 AM
And you know what? I don't care. My husband and kids are never going to reminisce about that time the counter shone like glass, how their socks never picked up hair when they walked across the carpet, or how dust-free living felt.


Y'know, I grew up in a house with homemade donuts, homemade potato chips (guess I really I really should call them crisps) a lot of handmade Halloween costumes and family games. Watching the clouds and picking out constellations on 'porch nights'. I remember big family holiday dinners and large twinkling trees filled by dawn's early light with brightly wrapped presents.

What else do I remember? How I stopped wearing socks in the house because on those days in gym class when we took of our shoes to play, the bottoms of my socks always looked dirty - how my clothes looked wrinkly and - looking back - how often I would not invite my friends over because the place was a mess.

So, y'know, memories work both ways and sometimes, memories like that, aren't always pleasent.

It's funny though...my friends had just as much fun with THEIR families and didn't live in the same kind of mess. Even now, I try to keep my place picked up and presentable because I *want* to invite people over and not be ashamed by drop-by guests.

Rabe...

DTNg
07-27-2005, 04:48 PM
And you know what? I don't care. My husband and kids are never going to reminisce about that time the counter shone like glass, how their socks never picked up hair when they walked across the carpet, or how dust-free living felt.


Y'know, I grew up in a house with homemade donuts, homemade potato chips (guess I really I really should call them crisps) a lot of handmade Halloween costumes and family games. Watching the clouds and picking out constellations on 'porch nights'. I remember big family holiday dinners and large twinkling trees filled by dawn's early light with brightly wrapped presents.

What else do I remember? How I stopped wearing socks in the house because on those days in gym class when we took of our shoes to play, the bottoms of my socks always looked dirty - how my clothes looked wrinkly and - looking back - how often I would not invite my friends over because the place was a mess.

So, y'know, memories work both ways and sometimes, memories like that, aren't always pleasent.

It's funny though...my friends had just as much fun with THEIR families and didn't live in the same kind of mess. Even now, I try to keep my place picked up and presentable because I *want* to invite people over and not be ashamed by drop-by guests.

Rabe...

I have similar memories - a lot of brothers and sisters and parents who worked and went to school full time. The house was always a mess and I was embarrassed to invite friends over. Clothes weren't ironed. If I lost a button, rather than sew it back on, my mother would run the shirt through the sewing machine -- no matter what color thread might have been inserted. As a result I might be wearing a white button down blouse, sewn closed down the front with green thread.

My mother stressed the importance of being creative (without her, I'd never have been a writer) and enjoying life over cleanliness and organization. That's fine, but at what cost?

I have wonderful memories of growing up in my large family, and one day it will be a book. I also remember being teased in school because of my clothes and the less than neat appearance of my home.

My sister recently told me her teenage daughter told her she never had friends over because she was embarrassed. (My sister has my Mom's sloppy habits.) Now they take Saturday mornings to do a few chores.

Jenny
07-28-2005, 05:00 AM
Lemon and salt can clean a shower - but it's harder work than using a commercial product. And this isn't really a tip, but I love those electro-static cloths (like Enjo) which clean everything - wet they take stains off upholstery and dry they take that smog/fog stuff off the inside of car windows.

A. Hamilton
07-28-2005, 05:13 AM
those new oxygen cleaners are the best i've found yet for cleaning shower doors and walls and old formica. i use a powder version i found at the Dollar Tree. (called Awesome Oxy Cleaner) it also works great for cutting stovetop grease and cleaning the bottoms of pans.

SLake
07-28-2005, 05:18 AM
Home cleaning tips?

1/ For dusty dryer -- Florida and use washing line.
2/ Otherwise, maid/manMaid.
3/ Threatening looking maid/manMaid supervisor.
4/ Hotel room with good fire-escape access.
5/ Ex's house keys.
6/ A sucker.
7/ Excuses.
8/ Insurance, flamethrower and friendly connections in investigative Dept.
9/ Dog with large tongue.


Hope that helps.

A. Hamilton
08-11-2005, 09:11 AM
Almost forgot my favorite tip.
Hydrogen peroxide takes out blood stains, rinse with cold water.

Tish Davidson
08-11-2005, 09:51 AM
After you have squeezed the juice out of a lemon, put it in a microwave safe container, cover with water and mircrowave on high for 5 minutes, then throw the lemon away and wipe out the microwave with a paper tower--takes all the stale microwave smell away.

Carole
08-12-2005, 12:55 AM
Do laundry tips fit in this category? I have a miracle one for when a bright colored print bleeds into a white background. Imagine a white cotton dress with a red candycane print that, when washed, became a pink dress with red candycanes.

Soak the article in a strong vinegar & cold water solution in the bathtub overnight and rinse fully the next morning. (6 inches of water in the tub and a half gallon of vinegar)

~then~

Soak all day in cold water and powdered all fabric bleach in the bathtub (6 inches of water and 2-3 cups of the bleach) for several hours, preferably all day. There may be some wierd color change stuff that goes on in the process - my candycanes turned black for about an hour - but the end result *should* be a white dress with red candycanes again.

The vinegar sets the dye in the print, but not the dye that bled out for some reason. The all fabric bleach removes the bleed. Afterward, it whould be safe to launder.

**********

My miracle everything cleaner? Clorox Clean-up. that stuff is amazing!

sassandgroove
08-12-2005, 01:18 AM
After you have squeezed the juice out of a lemon, put it in a microwave safe container, cover with water and mircrowave on high for 5 minutes, then throw the lemon away and wipe out the microwave with a paper tower--takes all the stale microwave smell away.

If you microwave a Clorox wipe (oh i dunno, try 15 to 30 seconds) the steam will loosen some of the built up crud, then you have a hot wipe to clean it the rest of the way. Be careful when first picking up the wipe though.

Jens22
08-12-2005, 01:36 AM
Got a bad stain on your upholstery? Try corn starch. Mix some up with a very little bit of water to make a thick paste. Stir it well (it will have a really weird consistency) then spread it over the stain. Let it dry completely overnight. The corn starch will draw the stain up and out. When dry, scrape off as much as you can with a butter knife or similar tool, then vacuum up the rest. Voila!

JAlpha
08-12-2005, 01:54 AM
When cleaning the dust from the top of all the doors in your house,
it's always nice to add a few stretches to your cleaning routine. :roll:


http://www.ghosttraveller.com/beauty09.jpg

A. Hamilton
08-12-2005, 06:48 AM
hahaha JAlpha :ROFL:

Speaking of vinegar for the wash..use it for a first rinse before wearing any new brightly colored item, especially tie-dye, to prevent bleeding.

DTNg
08-12-2005, 12:37 PM
If you microwave a Clorox wipe (oh i dunno, try 15 to 30 seconds) the steam will loosen some of the built up crud, then you have a hot wipe to clean it the rest of the way. Be careful when first picking up the wipe though.

You can get the same results with baking soda. Microwave a solution of a couple of teaspoons baking soda mixed with a cup of water. Put them in a small bowl and nuke for a minute or two. The grease and food around the microwave will be loosened and you can dip a sponge in the soilution and use to clean the remaining stains from the walls of the microwave.

inexperiencedinker
08-12-2005, 07:59 PM
I cook a lot with citrus, so I use the left overs.
Cut up one orange, or lemon, or lime, and drop piece at a time in the garbage disposal (turned on) with super hot water running. It deoderizes the entire kitchen, and kills a lot of the smelly crap in the garbage disposal.
(my whole family does this, lol, i guess it is the orange appeal http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/Emoterofl5.gif )

WVWriterGirl
08-13-2005, 05:19 AM
This is an email entitled "Good Things to Know" that a friend of mine sent me a while back. There are probably some spelling and formatting mistakes - I didn't write it, just copy and paste it here:

Good THINGS TO KNOW

1. Budweiser beer conditions the hair
2. Pam cooking spray will dry finger nail polish
3. Cool whip will condition your hair in 15 minutes
4. Mayonnaise will KILL LICE, it will also condition your hair
5. Elmer's Glue - paint on your face, allow it to dry, peel off and see the dead skin and blackheads if any

6. Shiny Hair - use brewed Lipton Tea
7. Sunburn - empty a large jar of Nestea into your bath water
8. Minor burn - Colgate or Crest toothpaste
9. Burn your tongue? Putsugar on it!
10. Arthritis? WD-40 Spray and rub in, kill insect stings too

11. Bee stings - meat tenderizer
12. Chigger bite - Preparation H
13. Puffy eyes - Preparation H
14. Paper cut - crazy glue or ! chap stick (glue is used instead of sutures at most hospitals)
15. Stinky feet - Jello!

16. Athletes feet - cornstarch
17. Fungus on toenails or fingernails - Vicks vapor rub
18. Kool aid to clean dishwasher pipes. Just put in t! he detergent section and run a cycle, it will also clean a toilet. (Wow, and we drink this stuff)
19. Kool Aid can be used as a dye in paint also Kool Aid in Dannon plain yogurt as a finger paint, your kids will love it and it won't hurt them if they eat it!
20. Peanut butter - will get scratches out of CD's! Wipe off with a coffee filter paper

21. Sticking bicycle chain - Pam no-stick cooking spray
22. Pam will also remove paint, and grease from your hands! Keep a can in your garage for your hubby
23. Peanut butter will remove ink from the face of dolls
24. When the doll clothes are hard to put on, sprinkle with corn starch and watch them slide on
25. Heavy dandruff - pour on the vinegar!

26. Body paint - Crisco mixed with food coloring. Heat the Crisco in the microwave, pour in to an empty film container and mix with the food color of your choice!
27. Tie Dye T-shirt - mix a solution of Kool Aid in a container, tie a rubber band around a section of the T-shirt and soak
28. Preserving a newspaper clipping - large bottle of club soda and cup of milk of magnesia, soak for 20 min. and let dry, will last for many years!
29. A Slinky will hold toast and CD's!
30. To keep goggles and glasses from fogging, coat with Colgate toothpaste

31. Wine stains, pour on the Morton salt and watch it absorb into the salt.
32. To remove wax - Take a paper towel and iron it over the wax stain, it will absorb into the towel.
33. Remove labels off glassware etc. rub with Peanut butter!
34. Baked on food - fill container with water, get a Bounce paper softener and the static from the Bounce towel will cause the baked on food to adhere to it. Soak overnight. Also; you can use 2 Efferdent tablets, soak overnight!
35. Crayon on the wall - Colgate to! othpaste and brush it!

36. Dirty grout - Listerine
37. Stains on clothes - Colgate
38. Grass stains - Karo Syrup
39. Grease Stains - Coca Cola, it will also remove grease stains from the driveway overnight. We know it will take corrosion from car batteries!
40. Fleas in your carpet? 20 Mule Team Borax- sprinkle and let stand for 24 hours.
41. To keep FRESH FLOWERS longer Add a little Clorox, or 2 Bayer aspirin, or just use 7-up i! nstead of water.

42. When you go to buy bread in the grocery store, have you ever wondered which is the freshest, so you "squeeze" for freshness or softness? Did you know that bread is delivered fresh to the stores five days a week? Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Each day has a different color twist tie. They are: Monday =Blue, Tuesday = Green, Thursday = Red, Friday = White and Saturday = Yellow.

So if today was Thursday, you would want red twist tie; not white which is Fridays (almost a week old)! The colors go alphabetically by color Blue- Green - Red - White - Yellow, Monday through Saturday. Very easy to remember. I thought this was interesting. I looked in the grocery store and the bread wrappers DO have different twist ties, and even the ones ! with the plastic clips have different colors.

Hope this helps!

WVWG

Vanessa
08-13-2005, 07:29 AM
This is an email entitled "Good Things to Know" that a friend of mine sent me a while back. There are probably some spelling and formatting mistakes - I didn't write it, just copy and paste it here:




Now that's some pretty cool tips. Some I've heard before, but the one about the bread, which is the best tip of them all, is new to me. I must use that one next time I'm buying bread.

scarlet
08-13-2005, 02:27 PM
Hey,

What brilliant tips! How I wish we had all that with the names of UK products. Some I recognise, some I don't. For instance does anybody know the UK equivalent of 'corn starch'?

As for the microwave, Instead of leaving lemon to heat, I use vanilla essence. Makes a gorgeous smell in the kitchen. I also use white vinegar and lemon juice in a spray for cleaning just about everything.

Must go, off to get some pink 'bleeds' off a white shirt.

Thanks,

Carole
08-15-2005, 07:00 PM
With the Kool aid for tie dyeing...It will work, but it will also fade if the fabric is cotton because it is technically a stain and not a dye with cotton fibers. Kool aid doesn't form a permanent bond unless you are dyeing nylon or wool...I also think silk can be dyed this way. Heat is a major factor in the process, so you either have to do the microwave thing or put the garment into a pot of near-boiling water with kool aid. It does make a fabulous, permanent nylon dye though. I have been tye dyeing vintage lingerie and selling it for ages.

Carole
08-15-2005, 07:07 PM
Just remembered another one. Scrubbing bubbles (aerosol, not the trigger spray kind because it is too wet) bathroom cleaner cleans just about anything off flat wall paint without removing the paint. Ordinary fingerprints to crayon, I have cleaned miles of walls with that stuff and a plain cello sponge.

aadams73
08-15-2005, 07:12 PM
. For instance does anybody know the UK equivalent of 'corn starch'?


Corn Flour.

Jaycinth
08-18-2005, 11:49 PM
This is the best cleaning solution by far.

Kids. (HEH HEH HEH, until my boy was 8, HE thought the dust buster was a toy car. Dust Bunnies beware!)

Coffee maker: run white vinegar through then clear water.

Scratched wood: Color hard with a like color crayon, buff off excess.

Slow Drains: A cup of bleach at night usually disolves most of it by morning.

No Liquid Fabric Softener: 3 tablespoons of hair conditioner, mixed with 3/4 cup of water, mix well.

Obnoxious Family: Don't use fabric softner then line dry everything.

Bathtub: Old broom handle. Staple or nail nylon net (or old bath scrubbies) to it. Be generous. Then any kind of cleanser will do. The leverage of the long stick helps you scrub without having to bend over like a babushka.

Baked on stuff inside of stove: Half an orange with salt on it, scrub. use more as necessary.

Edges of the kitchen floor/bathroom floor: Disobedient child with a toothbrush and cleanser.

Fleas: Buy an extra flea collar and cut it up and put it in your vaccuum bag.

Pet hair: Dustbuster your pet. Some cats don't like this. (like I really care, I feed him don't I?)

Sofa cushions: Tell the kids (roommates) that any money they find is theirs.

Mildew: If on shower curtains, take down and put in the washer with cold water and a cup of bleach. Even if they are plastic. Hang to dry. If on walls. Spray bottle and bleach solution 50/50 with water. Spray all surfaces open the window.

Wood floor: Tape those Swifter things to your slippers, open a beer and dance, dance, dance!

Mud tracked in on shoes: Death threats.

Crayon on the walls: Absorbent cotton rags and a Hot Iron. Most of it irons off, the rest can usually be wiped.

Stuff just left lying around the house: I have a big trash can labeled "LAST CHANCE" if the stuff is in the wrong place it goes in the trash can. the trash can goes out every Friday. If you want your stuff, go look in the trash can. There is rarely anything in it on Friday.

Bathroom Mirrors: someone answered this earlier but...Barbasol or any cheap shaving cream..no emolients. WHen mirror is dry, spray on about two quarter's size worth, rud in and polish off. Do this twice a week and your mirror won;t fog up when the steamy shower is on.

Diaper Pail: Husband or oldest child.

sassandgroove
08-19-2005, 01:42 AM
I like Jaycinth's attitude!!!! I will remember that when I have kids, especially the last chance can!

Shwebb
08-23-2005, 05:53 AM
Baking soda, for me, has been a lifesaver! It really helps to remove crayon marks from walls, television sets, windows . . . I just use a little with any ol' all purpose cleanser.

BTW, I will have to try the iron to remove crayon, but only after the kiddos are asleep.

DTNg
08-23-2005, 02:02 PM
Baking soda, for me, has been a lifesaver! It really helps to remove crayon marks from walls, television sets, windows . . . I just use a little with any ol' all purpose cleanser.

BTW, I will have to try the iron to remove crayon, but only after the kiddos are asleep.

You know what else is great for removing crayon from everything? WD-40!

threedogpeople
09-01-2005, 04:08 AM
We are on a community well in a rural area and the water has lots of particulates in it. We went away for 6 weeks and when we came back there was a brown scum line at the water level in the toilets. It took repeated attempts to get rid of it; white vinegar, bleach, baking soda, Lime-Away, amonia and TSP all failed but one of my friends told me to try a pumice stone! It worked great and was worth the $4 I spent on the pumice.

threedogpeople
09-01-2005, 04:26 AM
You know what else is great for removing crayon from everything? WD-40!

WD40 will also remove the sticky left after you take off a price tag.

The cloth & iron trick for crayons also works for candle wax on table cloths.

threedogpeople
09-01-2005, 04:28 AM
Those "Magic Erasers" are amazing too! They'll remove crayon from walls, black heal marks from floors, etc.