PDA

View Full Version : Agent wants to sub to US houses... but I'm British!



KookyKat
09-10-2009, 05:54 PM
My agent told me last week he's planning to sub my book to US publishers first. And yet I'm British, live in Britian, it's set in Britain and my agent is British (though he has US contacts too due to having worked for a major publishing house out there a few years back).

It's a YA paranormal romance so I guess this is (still) hot in the US right now but I feel vaguely concerned. Is he worried about UK market? Is he worried about the book selling?

Any advice appreciated.

KookyKat
09-10-2009, 05:57 PM
My agent told me last week he's planning to sub my book to US publishers first. And yet I'm British, live in Britian, it's set in Britain and my agent is British (though he has US contacts too due to having worked for a major publishing house out there a few years back).

It's a YA paranormal romance so I guess this is (still) hot in the US right now but I feel vaguely concerned. Is he worried about UK market? Is he worried about the book selling?

Any advice appreciated.

Mr Flibble
09-10-2009, 06:15 PM
Is he worried that there are far more people in the US, so there is a far bigger market?;)

Is it a problem for you to have a publishing house in the States? If not, I wouldn't sweat it. Plenty of authors sell to publishers overseas. As you say YA paranormal romance is selling well in the US. All it means is your agent is trying his / her best for your book.

If you're really worried, you could ask him why?

Mystic Blossom
09-10-2009, 06:18 PM
While not being agented myself, I would still urge you not to panic (and this is heavy advice for me, because sometimes I feel like I actively look for things to panic about). From what I've seen, most major publishers have branches all around the world, especially in the US and UK. So if your agents finds a home for your novel in the US, it seems very likely to me that it will be with a company that will have a branch or sister company in the UK, which will probably also publish it.

CACTUSWENDY
09-10-2009, 06:20 PM
Well, it seems to have worked out well for your Harry Potter author. I think I would be very flattered if I were you. Good luck with this.

the addster
09-10-2009, 06:25 PM
Actually this sounds like a good thing. Bigger market, more potential readers. I think I'd be kind of thrilled if I were in your place.

Claudia Gray
09-10-2009, 06:27 PM
Also, apparently there is a major difference in the YA markets between the U.S. and Britain -- many books that succeed wildly in one market will flop in the other, and even the crossover successes are often packaged/promoted very differently in each country. Your agent may feel that, despite the British setting and characters, the tone of your story is one that American publishers and readers will respond to more enthusiastically.

Calla Lily
09-10-2009, 06:28 PM
Um... Thank the publishing gods that your agent has contacts on 2 continents? Not trying to snark, just being logical.

Good luck!

KookyKat
09-10-2009, 06:32 PM
God, I sound so ungrateful, the US is a huge, wonderful market but just a bit of a surprise, that's all. U know us writers, so insecure and paranoid! Agent's mega busy with auction, and at end of email, he said: 'Speak to you when I send over thoughts on final revisions' which to me is a 'subject closed till I get in touch.' I need to stop being a pussy and ask him outright, why are we so scared of offending our agents!

veinglory
09-10-2009, 06:33 PM
The American market is ten times bigger. S/he wants to make you both more money.

KookyKat
09-10-2009, 06:40 PM
I don't mean to sound ungrateful, my main instinct was confusion and concern but has sunk in and understand it's a good thing. Am feeling real fragile / anxious about it all right now as on verge of being subbed so I just need to chillax...

ChaosTitan
09-10-2009, 06:46 PM
Have you discussed your concerns and questions with your agent? He or she will be able to explain the reasons for U.S. subbing better than we can.

CACTUSWENDY
09-10-2009, 06:49 PM
I see you have this same thread in another thread also. Please try to only post same things in one area. Now we have two different areas talking about the same thing. Maybe a Mod could merge them?

waylander
09-10-2009, 06:51 PM
I presume you signed with your agent on the basis that he knows the market better than you. Here is this knowledge in action.

KookyKat
09-10-2009, 06:54 PM
Have you discussed your concerns and questions with your agent? He or she will be able to explain the reasons for U.S. subbing better than we can.

He's so busy right now, I don't want to come across as an annoying, irritating, desperate writer.

erinbee
09-10-2009, 07:02 PM
He's so busy right now, I don't want to come across as an annoying, irritating, desperate writer.

Pff. You're partners now in selling your book, and you deserve to know the reasoning behind it if it's bugging you. It's all in the delivery...instead of calling and saying "OMG whyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy are you submitting to American houses, does it mean I'm a hopeless failure-to-be," I'd just bring it up casually in your next correspondence or call. "Do you anticipate any issues with American houses as a British author? I want to be prepared" or the like would be a good way to broach it.

Congratulations, by the way. Submission is an evil process that can get your brain twisted in a thousand different variations of worry, but you're in good hands!

the addster
09-10-2009, 07:03 PM
I think this is the kind of thing you can and should ask about. This is purely about business, it shouldn't be annoying, irritating, or desperate, to ask about why this is being done, or how it will be handled.

KookyKat
09-10-2009, 07:04 PM
I see you have this same thread in another thread also. Please try to only post same things in one area. Now we have two different areas talking about the same thing. Maybe a Mod could merge them?

I realised that after I posted (my computer crashed so thought I'd lost post then re-posted in wrong bit) so yeah, if mods can merge. Sorry for the confusion!

ChaosTitan
09-10-2009, 07:05 PM
He's so busy right now, I don't want to come across as an annoying, irritating, desperate writer.

A good agent will rarely be not busy. As erinbee says, you two are working together now. You've hired this agent to represent your book and your interests regarding this book. An email asking for clarification about his submission plan isn't annoying, irritating, or desperate.

Don't be intimidated by your own agent. This is your career he's representing, after all.

dpaterso
09-10-2009, 07:29 PM
Merged threads, sorry for any confusion, shout if any problems.

-Derek