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adktd2bks
09-02-2009, 08:53 PM
Hi. I'm looking for a word that would be the Italian equivalent of brother, bro or buddy. The way that one guy would address another in casual talk, especially if they were really close.

Thanks

Daveh
09-03-2009, 12:20 AM
I haven't lived in Italy for around 15 years so my colloquial Italian might be a bit out of date but...

Rather depends on the context. The normal, literal translation of "brother" is "fratello". For a younger brother or close friend one might use "fratellino" (the diminutive). Greeting a brother or close male friend one might say "Ciao bello". Most Italians will use a person's name in conversation. If they were in an intense discussion you might heear one say to the other "sente, stronzo..." (literally "listen, turd...") but the intonation makes it a term of affection. Really :)

If you need any more, can you give a context or two? I have a couple of younger Italian friends who I can probably ask.

annapippina
09-03-2009, 12:31 AM
I'm Italian :-)
If you're characters are not related, the best expression is "amico" ("friend"). But it could have a slightly threatening undertones... If I knew what the context is I could be more helpful.

adktd2bks
09-03-2009, 12:32 AM
This helps. Thanks a bunch.

ricmic
09-03-2009, 12:33 AM
My Italian is somewhat limited, too. I'd suggest "ragazzo", which means boy or guy. It's used as a direct address in casual speak among people younger than 35.

annapippina
09-03-2009, 12:48 AM
Sorry, ricmic, but "ragazzo" is not the right word to use if the conversation is between two close friends. It's commonly used to address errand boys or waiters in restaurants (and it's a little rude, too) or to (ironically) address an older friend.
Without context, I think the best thing to do is to use the person's name (or, even better, his/her nickname) like Daveh said.

adktd2bks
09-03-2009, 01:03 AM
Hmm...the context. the younger person is American but lived in Italy for a good portion of his life, so he's familiar with the language and very close to his older friend who is Italian. He considers this friend sort of like an older brother and the friend is very protective of him, he actually becomes his bodyguard. I would like to throw in a term at certain points that will lend a flavor of authenticity to their conversations, such as "brother" etc, but I don't want it to sound too contrived. Does this help?

annapippina
09-03-2009, 01:30 AM
Yes, it does. I think you should definitely go with a nickname with an Italian flavour to it (maybe something they've used just once or twice before). This would conveys the "intimate" feeling you're looking for. Any other term would sound really contrived and... un-Italian. If you need help with choosing an Italian nickname, just ask. I'll be happy to help.

adktd2bks
09-04-2009, 02:45 AM
Yes, it does. I think you should definitely go with a nickname with an Italian flavour to it (maybe something they've used just once or twice before). This would conveys the "intimate" feeling you're looking for. Any other term would sound really contrived and... un-Italian. If you need help with choosing an Italian nickname, just ask. I'll be happy to help.

Thanks for the advice. I'll try to come up with some sort of nickname. If I don't think of something then I'll contact you again.

:)

annapippina
09-04-2009, 07:05 PM
Start with the name of the Italian guy... "Giovanni" becomes "Nino", "Ninetto" "Vanni"; "Francesco" becomes "Cesco", "Cecco", "Ciccio"; "Giuseppe" becomes "Beppe", "Gio", "Peppe", "Pino"...