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Jack_Roberts
08-30-2009, 05:56 AM
I apologize ahead for the following rant but I need to get it out and see what others think about the topic.
I'm pissed. I just read an editor's thoughts on writers who create series before they've even sold their first book.
<a href="http://editorialanonymous.blogspot.com/2009/08/series-potential-seriously.html">
Series Potential, Seriously? </a> by Editorial Anonymous.

Now let me be clear. I know the quality of the writing is the most important thing. I know we must write self contained stories and I realize we do not query about plans for a series.
Agents and editors take a risk every time they sign up a new author. Most of us do not know the full extent of the business. It's all about making money and if we as authors come off with these large plans I guess it scares away the businessmen cause they see us as risks who only live in our little worlds.
So she/he is of course right. But this quote hurts and I wonder if it's a dream killer.

"More than that, experience has proven to most editors that the authors who are all excited about writing a series are either:
a) people who are under delusions of the millions of dollars there are to be made in children's books and who are uninterested in the quality of their writing in their pursuit of those dollars, or
b) people who are unhealthily obsessed with their creation and whose last interaction with reality was passing it in the street months ago, when they couldn't quite place where they knew reality from. It looked familiar... did its name start with an "R," maybe, or a "D"?"

From the very beginning I've seen this book idea as a series. I see the characters growing and learning throughout the books and I see the readers enjoying their stories. Maybe learning something from history at the same time.
But it's never been about money. Of course I need money to get out of debt, but that's what my day-job is for. Writers don't make much money. Sure, there are success stories but you cant measure against them. It's like winning the lottery.

A writer should write because they have a dream or passion that drives them. Writers should write because they love to share stories. Writers should write because they want to lift or entertain others.
Writers should never write to become richer than the Queen of England. Yes, lightning strikes, but that is based on many, many others feeling what you feel about your ideas and quite frankly that's up to what they need. If they need your story, great, but if they don't, it doesn't matter how well you write it, they wont read it.
That being said, I can swear to you point "a" in the above quote is not me. I never wrote a word in the hopeless expectation to receive cash.

But what about point "b"? Am I obsessed?
OK, she/he said "unhealthily obsessed with their creation and whose last interaction with reality".

I have songs from Lastat the musical. I have vampire themed music to get me in the mood for writing. I read vampire books because I want to make sure I'm not copying other authors. I Draw Annabelle pics for the Writer's Blog to break up the monotony of the text. I have pics of my characters for my screen saver. My blogger ID is "Scribe of Annabelle". I joke about the muse driving me and refer to it as Annabelle.
So yes. I'm obsessed.

Have I lost my connection with reality? I work a 40 work week as a drafter. I focus on my job and work very hard. I come home and help with the kids homework unless they're finished. Then I do dishes, help my gorgeous wife with dinner and enjoy a meal with the family. I watch TV or movies with them and then read my son a bed time story (and no, it's NOT my novel) then walk the dogs for a block or more. I close off the night with quality time with my wife, and then go to bed to wake up at 4:30 am to start all over again. I pay my house mortgage, car payment and other bills. I meet with my kids teachers to make sure they are doing well.

OK, so even though I act normal, I'm obsessed with my story because of the reasons above. I'm lost because I happen to love my characters and see so much in their future.
DAMMIT.
Rowling was obsessed because she had plans. Shan, Meyers, Hunter, so many others must've been obsessed too then. After all, in their first books they had seeds planted for future books. Did they have notes, too?

I know the first book may never sell. I realize it may die on its feet. But that doesn't mean I shouldn't dream of a series. I shouldn't have a bigger plan.
Writing this novel has made me a better writer. I’ve learned so much and continue to try and improve my skills. I do plan to write other things. Just because I have planed for a series doesn't mean I'm deluded or out of focus with reality.

I don't know. I guess that's why all the agents reject me now. My query doesn't go into any of this. It doesn't even mention a series. But maybe they've seen me on the web going on about Annabelle and they said "No way in hell we're representing him."
Guess I'm screwed. I blew it and all I wanted to do was share it with the world.
Stupid.

C.bronco
08-30-2009, 05:59 AM
Quitting is for quitters. (?)

No way. Don't quit! I cleave to my delusions.

If it were easy, everyone would do it.

Do what you are.

Calla Lily
08-30-2009, 06:10 AM
That is one editor's opinion.

See sig for my opinion. :D

Karen Duvall
08-30-2009, 06:19 AM
I haven't read EA's blog post yet, but it's generally advised that writers refrain from writing more than the first book in a series just in case it doesn't sell. Because if you have like 2 or 3 series books and the first one doesn't sell, the others won't either, so what's the point? Unless you write them to please yourself, and there's certainly nothing wrong with that. All writing should be done for the joy of it, not for the single-minded goal of having it published. The publication part is a bonus. :) Spoken by someone with a few trunked manuscripts that will never see ink, and I'm fine with that. I moved on.

As for the delusion part, that doesn't track unless the author is only in it for the money, which wouldn't apply to serious writers devoted to their art. So if it's a blanket statement to all series writers no matter who they are, shame on EA. As for the second point about obsession, all writers are naturally obsessed with their creations, IMO, because we believe in our characters and the world we created for them. What's not to be obsessed about? And it wouldn't matter if it were a series or a one-off single title. We are in love with our books. If we're not, we might want to think about doing something else.

I've finished the first books in two different series that my agent is trying to sell. Will I write the next book in either series? I choose not to. They're plotted, but not written. I'm working on something totally new because I want to be sure my series have homes before I write them. But that's just me. Others may feel differently.

nitaworm
08-30-2009, 07:32 AM
I refuse to let one persons or even many people's opinion change my dreams...never, never give up...Remember 'can't' means won't. So don't quit..ever!

Mumut
08-30-2009, 08:15 AM
I know we must write self contained stories and I realize we do not query about plans for a series.
...most editors that the authors who are all excited about writing a series are either:
a) people who are under delusions of the millions of dollars there are to be made in children's books and who are uninterested in the quality of their writing in their pursuit of those dollars, or
b) people who are unhealthily obsessed with their creation and whose last interaction with reality was passing it in the street months ago, when they couldn't quite place where they knew reality from. It looked familiar... did its name start with an "R," maybe, or a "D"?"

Wow! I'm glad nobody told me this before. I had the first book published without the second in the series being finished. That is now published as well. I've just sent the third in the series to the publisher.

I had the first two books published in Australia when I was accepted by my Canadian publisher who accepted the two books knowing there would be a third eventually.

If I'd heard what you were saying and listened to it, I'd not be published.

Smish
08-30-2009, 08:37 AM
I love EA's blog; it's one of the absolute best resources for chidren's book writers.

But sometimes she's wrong. And occasionally, she's mean.

She assumes that the majority of writers are morons who will never be published, and okay, she's probably right. But she often fails to remember that people who are actually reading the blogs and doing the research are serious about being published.

I was the person who posed the question to EA. Yep, me. And I specifically asked about CHAPTER BOOKS. Why? Because chapter books have SERIES. The most popular chapter books are books in a series (Magic Tree House, Judy Moody, Stink, Cam Jansen, Ivy and Bean, etc). They can be read in any order and each novel is a stand alone. That is not the same as a book with sequels.

MG, YA, and adult novels don't have series in the same way. They have books with sequels; you generally have to read them in order.

I'm not a moron. I've done my research; lots of it. I'm currently writing a chapter book, so I read several a week. I've searched the blogs looking for information on chapter books, and there's little to be found. The focus is always on MG and YA.

Her response didn't give me any information I didn't already know. In fact, I specifically said in the question that I'm aware that mentioning a sequel with MG and YA novels is frowned upon. But chapter books are a different animal. They are for young children, who are learning to read and enjoy the familiarity of a specific set of characters, so series are extremely popular. So, I wanted to know how to query for chapter books. Instead, she referenced Stephenie Meyer's books, which are YA.

Anyway, my point is, I was the person she was responding to, and yet I'm not bothered by her response. She's an editor; she sifts through a lot of crap. That's her perspective. I'm confident in my writing skills, and I enjoy writing. I'm not going to get discouraged by a blog entry. You shouldn't either.

Also, I'll keep reading her blog. She knows a great deal about the business, and she has a lot to share.

:)Smish

P.S. Oh, and I'm not in it for the money. It would be nice to be able to live off of my writing, but I don't expect to ever be able to do that. That's why I went to law school...

mario_c
08-30-2009, 09:02 AM
Damn, those children's book editors are a two-fisted bunch. :eek: Nothing like Hollywood agents or producers, my area of expertise's gatekeepers and moneymen.
:D
As to one's grasp on reality, it's all relative. We live in a world where we all go home and type into an electronic gadget and that is one's view of the world. My radio, TV, home office and social life in a silver box. And we program through it specifically the music, news and information we want to know about and that becomes your world.
And our hobby lives are the same way - in our case we spend our lonely weekends* creating imaginary people and writing at great length about their world and their adventures, friends and enemies. In short yeah, we're all going insane.
Your only hope is to steer your delusions into acts of good and not evil. How I cope - first of all, I have other more "normal" hobbies: playing music, outdoor sports, partner dancing, philosophical discussion groups, live music clubs And when it comes to my writing, I gather as many critics as I can to reinforce my faith that I am not a deluded Ed Wood type, scribbling drivel and nonsense and thinking it's a masterpiece. This is important! Staying grounded is vital to your survival as a writer and a person.

My opinion, what do I know? Keep selling!

*those of us without a "gorgeous wife" and family

nitaworm
08-30-2009, 09:15 AM
Smish ... you go!!! I am so there with you... I didn't start writing for the money... even now with my work on the edge of being released to the world, I am in it only to write great stories which are an expression of my imagination (with my kids in mind) and other kids who have read my work and beg me to write more.

Now if people actually purchase and love my books... I am truly happy...

Jack_Roberts
08-30-2009, 05:08 PM
Thank you. Everyone, thank you very much.
Writing is a funny thing. Once I finished venting my frustration I realized that I didn’t really mean to quit. As others have said, one (or many) negative opinions will not deter me. But I did need to hear other obsessed writers weigh in on the matter.

Smish, I didn’t ever think you were in it for the money. In fact I have nothing against you but instead have respect. You sound like you have a great dream and I commend you on it. My obsession is steering me to help/inspire/entertain children from 11 on up so chapter books are not in my path but my children love them. All the power to you. I hope you get your answers and continue to climb.

Thanks again, guys. I had a momentary drop in faith. Had them before and I will again. But it’s just turbulence ladies and gentlemen. We’re still on our journey and will be arriving at our destination, published land, at some point in the future. Feel free to move about the cabin.

I’m five chapters away from finishing the second book in the SERIES so I think I’ll finish it. Then I’ll start a new book with different characters because that’s the plan.

childeroland
08-30-2009, 06:04 PM
Rejection is part of the writer's life; everyone goes through it -- even the greats. Look at this Guardian article about greats who've had to go through it:



Dear Mr Orwell, we regret to say …

Joseph Heller, George Orwell, John le Carré and Stephen King are some of the celebrated writers who have tasted rejection...

I'm feeling sorry for Polly Perkins. This unfortunate woman, about whom almost nothing is known, goes down in posterity as the Faber reader who wrote, on an unpublished manuscript submitted for her expert scrutiny: "Absurd & uninteresting fantasy about the explosion of an atom bomb on the Colonies. A group of children who land in jungle country near New Guinea. Rubbish & dull. Pointless."

Not a lady to mince her words, Ms Perkins. But, in so comprehensively dissing Strangers From Within (as Lord of the Flies was known before its triumphant publication in September 1954), Polly Perkins was at least expressing her honest, if wrong-headed, literary opinion. Perhaps she was influenced in her verdict by the manuscript's dog-eared, yellowing pages; it had already been rejected by at least a dozen well-known imprints.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2009/aug/30/robert-mccrum-on-books

kuatolives
08-30-2009, 08:04 PM
Seriously, stop reading blogs of people who claim to be 'in the know.' They are motivational assassins. I never read agents' blogs because I could give a crap what they have to say. There's not one rule of writing and publishing that doesn't come with a hundred exceptions. Just write your stuff and be happy.

MsJudy
08-30-2009, 08:05 PM
I think EA is missing something because she (he?) is on the business side of the equation, not the creative side.

The "reality" is that the line between Inspiration and Insanity is thinner than the trip wires in a Mission Impossible movie. All great writers become obsessed with their characters. The world they create does become more real to them than the one the rest of us live in. It's that quality which makes them able to bring it to life so that we, the readers, can join in.

But I would say that the same is true of many schizophrenics. The difference is that a writer can safely move in and out of the two realities, and serve as the bridge so that others can enter in. Most mentally ill folks can't keep the two separate.

But history is full of famous writers and other artists who, especially when denied the opportunity to explore their art, got lost in it and went pretty nuts. Read any of the early feminist literature for some great examples...

So. You have permission to be as obsessed as you need to be. It's part of the creative process. Period.

aadams73
08-30-2009, 08:36 PM
First of all, what Smish said about EA sometimes being wrong and mean. I totally agree.

1. It may not be about money to you, but it is to publishers. They don't care about your dream or your attachment to your characters. They care about their business.

2. Don't pin everything on one story. Write something else. Maybe you can sell Annabelle's story later. Maybe not. But do take a break from Annabelle and come back to it later. A fresh perspective may change everything and give you a fresh twist on the vampire genre, which, I suspect, is part of the reason why no one is biting.

3. Obsession is a destructive force. Be ambitious instead. Hone it and focus that ambition. Make it work for you instead of against you. Because right now? Well, I've been watching this Annabelle thing go on for a few years now, and it comes across as obsessive. Don't let it rule you. Believing in your work is one thing, blinding yourself to other--potentially--stronger and better possibilities is another.

Mharvey
08-30-2009, 08:43 PM
This is a very interesting "rant"... though I think you're being too hard on yourself by calling it that.

It's a very legitimate fear to all writers who want to craft a world that doesn't end when you type the last page of your first book.

I love the worlds I make, and I usually like the characters in them. I'd love to continue their stories, for no one has only 1 interesting thing happen in their lives.

That being said, the reality of publishing is a brutal, brutal thing. If anyone could make hundreds of thousands of dollars by sitting in one place for long enough, pushing letters on a keyboard, the world would pretty much fall apart.

Yet, so many people think that if you can just get through a book, you collect a paycheck. It would be like if people think they could throw the football around with their friends for an hour or two a day for a month... they'd get extended a 3 year, $3 million deal with the Steelers.

Unfortunately, the difference between a high school quarterback and Ben Roethlisberger, in the writing world, is much more subtle and open to interpretation. In Football, nothing's open to interpretation... you can either throw a perfect spiral 40 yards and hit a fly, or you can't. There's nothing else to it.

Alot of it depends on ceaseless effort, constant hard work and discipline... every bit as much as a pro quarterback, just with your head in books and your own writing... not working out. And, you also have to have raw talent. Stephen King said it best in On Writing, though I'm paraphrasing: "There's bad writers out there. These people can work as hard as they want, they will always be bad and nothing is going to change that."

So, basically, as long as you have a competent writing style - you can do it. Unless you're a born Shakespeare, however, you have to dedicate yourself to it with the same discipline as a pro-football quarterback.

It's plagued me for the past few years... am I really good enough? Do I really have what it takes? I've never even so much had a partial request for my work. Is my style that bad I can't even get through the front door?

I just have to believe if I work hard enough, it will happen.

Smish
08-30-2009, 09:00 PM
Glad you're feeling better today, Jack!

Red-Green
08-30-2009, 10:50 PM
They are motivational assassins.

Fabulous line! I do read agent/editor blogs, but I don't take personally or literally everything they say. Because as Kuato points out...doing that while you're actually in the midst of writing will kill your momentum.

Wordwrestler
08-31-2009, 09:07 AM
I've written four non-trunked novels and begun a fifth, all of which are unrelated to one another, and all of which I hope will one day have sequels. My characters live on in my mind beyond their first stories. Am I crazy? I don't think so.

Every time I've spoken to my agent about my novel, I've been struck by how involved she was in the story, how she talked about the characters like they were real people, how passionate she was about what happened to them. Someone else may have thought she was a bit crazy. I thought it was so cool I could hardly speak. The characters that were so real in my head were real in someone else's now, too!

Jack, may your stories eventually find readers for whom they come alive, too.

Smish, that's a great point about chapter books--the kind for young kids that follow familiar characters, in any order. They're an important and beloved step in kids' reading growth. My daughter has recently discovered the old Nate the Great books. It's too bad EA missed an opportunity to explore this distinction.

arkady
08-31-2009, 06:48 PM
Seriously, stop reading blogs of people who claim to be 'in the know.' They are motivational assassins. I never read agents' blogs because I could give a crap what they have to say. There's not one rule of writing and publishing that doesn't come with a hundred exceptions. Just write your stuff and be happy.

Well said. Too many omniscient gods dispensing too much Eternal Wisdom is bad for writers, most of whom are insecure to begin with.

RG570
08-31-2009, 09:27 PM
It's amazing how many people in charge of running this business seem to have so much contempt for it.

Maybe their time would be better spent trying to get rich selling Sham Wow. At the very least, they should manage their anxiety disorders by going out for exercise instead of writing pointless blogs.

Phaeal
09-03-2009, 02:14 AM
Without obsession, who could get through all the work of creating a world and writing a novel? Obsession rocks. It's a decent perfume, too, very popular among vampires.

Writers have lost touch with reality? Gee, I guess we all live in tents under overpasses instead of working full-time jobs and paying taxes and keeping up households and THEN hitting the keyboard for a thousand words a day or so.

My plan is to write the first books of a bunch of series and see which one hits. ;)

himynameisamanda
09-04-2009, 03:42 PM
I was unaware that was it bad to write a series or mention. I assumed, after researching the young adult market and finding most books in some form of a series, that that was the way things were done, so I said to myself, "I shall write a series! A young adult series! An urban fantasy even! Because this is what is selling and this is what I enjoy reading and this will be the to key to my success!"

Now, it seems like everything I deduced was completely false. This, of course, comes after I've written like seven books in three different series, and I've fallen in love with writing young adult/urban fantasy/series. I feel some hope, because she said that the exception to the rule is writing 54 books in a 5 years, and I could totally do that. I've written and edited 6.5 books since January. (I've also had them edited by other people, just to be sure I'm not churning unreadible drudge.)

Maybe it is unreadible, though. Maybe I've failed every turn. I don't know. Lots of people have read it and said its awesome. But none of those people have been agents. So I don't know how valid their opinion is.

How do you know the difference between being a total fail and just not being published yet? You know what I mean?

No offense to anyone reading this, but some people will never be published because their work simply isn't good enough, but nobody is really telling them that, I'm sure.

So how do I know that I'm not one of those deluded people? Am I just the literary equivalent of the people that we all laugh at on American Idol during the auditions?

Calla Lily
09-04-2009, 04:03 PM
Wait till I pick myself up off the floor after reading your output stats. :Hail:

Have you had writers crit your work, or only friends read it? The way to tell is to give it to objective strangers who know the genre and the nuts and bolts of writing. Are you in a crit group?

himynameisamanda
09-04-2009, 04:15 PM
Have you had writers crit your work, or only friends read it? The way to tell is to give it to objective strangers who know the genre and the nuts and bolts of writing. Are you in a crit group?

I'm not in a group. I had a writing class and had people read it there, and I had the first book in one series professionally edited with a service I paid for and what not. But the majority of people that have read it have been friends and coworkers, cause those are the majority of the people I know.

Calla Lily
09-04-2009, 05:15 PM
I'm not in a group. I had a writing class and had people read it there, and I had the first book in one series professionally edited with a service I paid for and what not. But the majority of people that have read it have been friends and coworkers, cause those are the majority of the people I know.

Other writers are really what your book needs. There's a forum here on AW to ask for beta readers. I :heart: my betas. They kick my butt when needed and show me what works--and especially what doesn't. You can also post the first chapter here in the Share Your Work forum (password: vista), but do read a few threads first to get a feel for what kid of crit to expect in there. SYW is full of good and helpful people, but they don't sugarcoat. If you're not quite ready to hear unvarnished comments, then you might want to try a beta first.

Also, SYW is a give-and-take forum. If you spend time critting other writers, they'll spend time critting you. Good luck!

Katrina S. Forest
09-07-2009, 03:11 PM
I agree with a lot of what's been said here. Writers needs our delusions sometimes. We probably don't need them when we're trying to do a healthy edit. (I can't cut this! It's brilliant!) But we need them when that 20th rejection letter arrives and we know the work is as polished as we can make it. We need them when some member of our critique group tells us there's no hope for our writing, even though he or she has never set foot in an editor's office. We need them quite a lot.

EDIT: It's true some people will never be published, but I don't think that has as much to do with their "inability" to write as it does with their unwillingness to improve. It takes years to shape any artistic craft. Quite honestly, some of the worst people on American Idol have fine voices, they just have no control over them.

I love the NaNoWriMo Pep Talk e-mails. This one's from Piers Anthony last year and I think it's very appropriate:

"So are you going to give up this folly and focus on reality before you step off the cliff? No? Are you sure? ... Sigh. You're a lost soul. So there's no help for it but to join the lowly company of the other aspect of The Fool. Because the fact is, that Fool is a Dreamer, and it is Dreamers who ultimately make life worthwhile for the unimaginative rest of us. Dreamers consider the wider universe. Dreamers build cathedrals, shape fine sculptures, and yes, generate literature,"

michellek
11-04-2009, 11:48 PM
I apologize ahead for the following rant but I need to get it out and see what others think about the topic.
I'm pissed. I just read an editor's thoughts on writers who create series before they've even sold their first book.
<a href="http://editorialanonymous.blogspot.com/2009/08/series-potential-seriously.html">
Series Potential, Seriously? </a> by Editorial Anonymous.

Now let me be clear. I know the quality of the writing is the most important thing. I know we must write self contained stories and I realize we do not query about plans for a series.
Agents and editors take a risk every time they sign up a new author. Most of us do not know the full extent of the business. It's all about making money and if we as authors come off with these large plans I guess it scares away the businessmen cause they see us as risks who only live in our little worlds.
So she/he is of course right. But this quote hurts and I wonder if it's a dream killer.

"More than that, experience has proven to most editors that the authors who are all excited about writing a series are either:
a) people who are under delusions of the millions of dollars there are to be made in children's books and who are uninterested in the quality of their writing in their pursuit of those dollars, or
b) people who are unhealthily obsessed with their creation and whose last interaction with reality was passing it in the street months ago, when they couldn't quite place where they knew reality from. It looked familiar... did its name start with an "R," maybe, or a "D"?"

From the very beginning I've seen this book idea as a series. I see the characters growing and learning throughout the books and I see the readers enjoying their stories. Maybe learning something from history at the same time.
But it's never been about money. Of course I need money to get out of debt, but that's what my day-job is for. Writers don't make much money. Sure, there are success stories but you cant measure against them. It's like winning the lottery.

A writer should write because they have a dream or passion that drives them. Writers should write because they love to share stories. Writers should write because they want to lift or entertain others.
Writers should never write to become richer than the Queen of England. Yes, lightning strikes, but that is based on many, many others feeling what you feel about your ideas and quite frankly that's up to what they need. If they need your story, great, but if they don't, it doesn't matter how well you write it, they wont read it.
That being said, I can swear to you point "a" in the above quote is not me. I never wrote a word in the hopeless expectation to receive cash.

But what about point "b"? Am I obsessed?
OK, she/he said "unhealthily obsessed with their creation and whose last interaction with reality".

I have songs from Lastat the musical. I have vampire themed music to get me in the mood for writing. I read vampire books because I want to make sure I'm not copying other authors. I Draw Annabelle pics for the Writer's Blog to break up the monotony of the text. I have pics of my characters for my screen saver. My blogger ID is "Scribe of Annabelle". I joke about the muse driving me and refer to it as Annabelle.
So yes. I'm obsessed.

Have I lost my connection with reality? I work a 40 work week as a drafter. I focus on my job and work very hard. I come home and help with the kids homework unless they're finished. Then I do dishes, help my gorgeous wife with dinner and enjoy a meal with the family. I watch TV or movies with them and then read my son a bed time story (and no, it's NOT my novel) then walk the dogs for a block or more. I close off the night with quality time with my wife, and then go to bed to wake up at 4:30 am to start all over again. I pay my house mortgage, car payment and other bills. I meet with my kids teachers to make sure they are doing well.

OK, so even though I act normal, I'm obsessed with my story because of the reasons above. I'm lost because I happen to love my characters and see so much in their future.
DAMMIT.
Rowling was obsessed because she had plans. Shan, Meyers, Hunter, so many others must've been obsessed too then. After all, in their first books they had seeds planted for future books. Did they have notes, too?

I know the first book may never sell. I realize it may die on its feet. But that doesn't mean I shouldn't dream of a series. I shouldn't have a bigger plan.
Writing this novel has made me a better writer. I’ve learned so much and continue to try and improve my skills. I do plan to write other things. Just because I have planed for a series doesn't mean I'm deluded or out of focus with reality.

I don't know. I guess that's why all the agents reject me now. My query doesn't go into any of this. It doesn't even mention a series. But maybe they've seen me on the web going on about Annabelle and they said "No way in hell we're representing him."
Guess I'm screwed. I blew it and all I wanted to do was share it with the world.
Stupid.

Never quit writing! People who quit basically fail themselves. Do not quit trying to get accepted. Someone out there will eventually give you an yes to your work. One person may throw it out the window and tear it apart, but another person is going to enjoy it. Don't Quit!

Jack_Roberts
11-05-2009, 12:01 AM
Thanks!
After some serious thinking I'm back on track. Thanks for the kind words.

Nya RAyne
11-15-2009, 01:01 AM
Sounds like a collossal ass to me.

Write what you love and love what you write. If you didn't and sent a query or ms, they'd probably reject you because, 'it doesn't have heart.'

I swear, some of thes agents are pretentious so an so's.

Keep your head up, love!!