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JulieHowe
08-29-2009, 10:28 AM
My MC is the adult daughter of a man who is personal friends with the Chief of Police in a large American city. She's mentally ill and the police are called to a store after she makes a verbal and physical threat against the clerk.

This takes place in 1991, although any modern information would also be helpful. When the officers call in her state ID card number, would the dispatcher have a code indicating that this is the daughter of a VIP, and that they'll have to call into police headquarters and clear it with the brass before they can arrest her? She's also an ex-con on parole, so would that status take precedence over any VIP designation?


Thanks!

Rabe
08-29-2009, 02:35 PM
This takes place in 1991, although any modern information would also be helpful. When the officers call in her state ID card number, would the dispatcher have a code indicating that this is the daughter of a VIP, and that they'll have to call into police headquarters and clear it with the brass before they can arrest her?

No. And if they did and someone in the public found out about it, then the police chief will get carpal tunnel from writing out all the settlement checks.


She's also an ex-con on parole, so would that status take precedence over any VIP designation?

No, because there is no VIP designation.

But yes, parole status would definitely come up and come into play.

Rabe...

smcc360
08-29-2009, 05:05 PM
An arrest would also violate the terms of her parole, which would be a new and separate charge.

Most of the political stuff would probably come into play during pretrial negotiations. However, depending on how friendly the father is with the Chief of Police, he might be able to get the charges reduced before her arraignment.

JulieHowe
08-30-2009, 12:17 AM
Thanks! She's going to jail and back to prison for violating her parole. I was just stuck on that one detail before the arrest, and both of you answered my question.

RJK
08-30-2009, 08:25 PM
If you want to see a police supervisor crap his pants, watch his reaction when one of his officers asks "Are you ordering me NOT to arrest this person?"
If an officer at the scene believes an arrest is necessary, the only way that person would not be arrested, would be if he had diplomatic immunity, and in some cases, even that wouldn't keep him from getting a ride to the hoosgaw.
There are no VIP codes. In small towns, where everyone knows who's who, some people are handled with kid gloves, but in your scenario, the parolee would be on her way to jail.

blacbird
08-30-2009, 09:44 PM
If an officer at the scene believes an arrest is necessary, the only way that person would not be arrested, would be if he had diplomatic immunity, and in some cases, even that wouldn't keep him from getting a ride to the hoosgaw.

I doubt if even a claim of "diplomatic immunity" would prevent an arrest. That issue would have to be settled subsequent to the actual arrest, probably with considerable wrangling. It wouldn't be up to the arresting officer to make that decision.

caw

rugcat
08-30-2009, 11:02 PM
I doubt if even a claim of "diplomatic immunity" would prevent an arrest. That issue would have to be settled subsequent to the actual arrest, probably with considerable wrangling. It wouldn't be up to the arresting officer to make that decision.

cawI was once called by department store security on a shoplifter. The suspect turned out to be the adult daughter of a captain. Before proceeding, I gave the captain a "courtesy call" to let him know what was up. Most officers i know would have done the same.

The captain told me to treat the case just as I would any other. If he'd asked me to give her a break, or even hinted at it, it would have got sticky. I probably would have explained the situation to store security and asked if they were adamant about prosecuting.

That of course is not right, but cops do look out for each other; never doubt that.

Chase
08-31-2009, 01:16 AM
Before proceeding, I gave the captain a "courtesy call" to let him know what was up.

The captain told me to treat the case just as I would any other.

Your heads up to a superior was understandable. I once called a dean to let him know the daughter he put in my class so she wouldn't flunk was flunking. It completely violated student confidentiality and a few more rules, but I felt bound to warn this parent, whereas I would not have done so outside the faculty.

Like your captain, my dean said, "Thanks. We tried, but obviously she won't. Grade her as you would any other of your students."

RJK
08-31-2009, 09:25 PM
On the other hand, there is a rumor that one of our current officers, whose dad was a captain, held up a gas station using his father's gun, when he was a teenager. The boy was caught and brought into the booking desk. All records of the arrest and everyone's memory is blank from that point. That includes the owner of the gas station.
I never liked that captain.

JulieHowe
09-01-2009, 04:10 AM
Thank you to everyone for your helpful answers. :)

Rabe
09-01-2009, 10:23 AM
That of course is not right, but cops do look out for each other; never doubt that.

Oh doubt it very much.

There are parameters to 'looking out for each other' that make what the public think of cops to be joyful and worshipful by comparison.

You don't meet those criteria for whatever reason and they'll push you out in a heartbeat. Such as one guy I know who's sergeant decided to get him fired based, in part, on the sergeant's perception that this guy can't be a good cop because 'he doesn't believe in god'.

And so far, it seems the sergeant's plan is working and his department is refusing to look into those hostile work complaints. His lawyer even said "I'm not sure it'll go anywhere because you're white, under forty and a male."

So yeah, doubt it. Doubt it very much.

Rabe...