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LaceWing
08-15-2009, 11:50 AM
Association for Psychological Science (http://www.psychologicalscience.org/media/releases/2009/foroni.cfm)

The results of these experiments reveal that simply reading emotion verbs activates specific facial muscles and can influence judgments we make. The researchers note these findings suggest that "language is not merely symbolic, but also somatic," and they conclude that "these experiments provide an important bridge between research on the neurobiological basis of language and related behavioral research."

And then in a UCSB sociology video (Thomas Scheff), I was told English has an extreme paucity of emotive words, especially as compared to Maori.

Discuss?

ColoradoGuy
08-19-2009, 01:53 AM
But yet we have emoticons. Perhaps this is why.

CammyMayHunny
08-20-2009, 02:00 AM
I can see a shootout coming on, emotismilies vs tattoo/scarification in a closed-cage smackdown match.

Brad
02-03-2010, 09:56 PM
This is very much like the study where students did something with a list of words, and then were observed as they walked down a hallway. It was found that those primed with words associated with the elderly like "frail" and "hunched" walked more slowly down the hallways than those primed with words associated with youth. I can't find an excerpt of the study - does anyone know which one I'm talking about?

Fallen
02-04-2010, 02:05 PM
Eesh, I've just been a guinea pig in a similar test a few moments ago: the Stroop Effect; investigating cognitive psychology (dealing with the way brain processes information, specifically auotomatic processing and controlled processing). Honestly, I only went in for a packet of nuts...

Does this mean language is going to get an ASBO (antisocial behavioural order) because don't hack and slash movies work on the same theory: how processing them can (sometimes) make you want to go hack and slash on everything (only this time with a smile). Great, let's give kids ANOTHER excuse to get of English lessons (they learn their rights for too young these kids).